Chinese elm

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Chinese elm

Post  bring us a shrubbery on Tue Jan 24, 2012 5:02 am

Was just wondering what the process is for chinese elm seeds.Like how long do i stratify for?pretty much a entire rundown of the process,i'm very new to bonsai ..any help would be great thanks

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Jesse McMahon on Tue Jan 24, 2012 5:14 am

As a general rule, if I have a basic bonsai or horticultural question (or even a more advanced one!) I put it into my google search bar. There's a whole lot of good information out there, just be careful to double check your 'facts' that you may come across. And then if you still have questions, everyone here has been very nice to me in that regard so far.

In the meantime here's a link that might be useful to you on this very forum.

http://ibonsaiclub.forumotion.com/t8553-bonsai-seeds-stratification

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  bring us a shrubbery on Tue Jan 24, 2012 5:22 am

yea i saw that i just wanted to know pretty much how long they need to be in the fridge and what they should look like before i take them out of it

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  fiona on Tue Jan 24, 2012 7:44 am

Hello and welcome to the forum. I hope you get many years of enjoyment from Bonsai.

With regard to your question - the thread that Jesse directed you to is pretty much the best you're going to get as an answer. If you scroll down the entire thread you will see pictures of what the seeds should look like when you take them out the fridge. The author has also given good general timescales throughout the thread. I'd also draw your attention to the advice that seeds will germinate at different speeds, mostly depending on species but even within the same batch there may be variations depending on how viable each seed is (You will have heard the expressions "good seed" and "bad seed"). If you have not had much experience with growing plants from seed (any kind, not just bonsai) there is an element of trial and error about the whole process anyway.

You mentioned that you are "very new" to bonsai - perhaps you could tell us a bit more about what you have done so far. This helps us identify what level of advice we give you. For example, at this point we would probably ask newcomers to bonsai if they recognise that growing a bonsai from seed - while undoubtedly very rewarding - is a lengthy process and it will be a good few years before you have anything that can be styled and shaped as a bonsai.

Let us know your level of experience - of general horticulture and bonsai - and people can take it from there.

Good luck




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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Russell Coker on Tue Jan 24, 2012 1:07 pm


Here's my observation, don't know if it answers your questions or not...

My 8b winter is very mild, with temps falling into the 20's and rising to the 70's as extremes. We have a few frosts and freezes, but nothing you'd consider severe or prolonged. The seeds ripen on the trees in autumn and by now most are off the trees. Judging by the way they seem to come up EVERYWHERE in spring, whatever cold they get - or don't get - from late November to early March is sufficient.

R


Last edited by Russell Coker on Tue Jan 24, 2012 1:47 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Bob Pressler on Tue Jan 24, 2012 1:42 pm

I have the same experience as Russell, every spring we pull hundreds of Chinese elm seedlings out of pots, cracks in the wood of the benches, my gutters,etc. In other words they don't need anything special.

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Poink88 on Tue Jan 24, 2012 1:45 pm

Our winters are even milder (zone 9B) than Russell's but our local Cedar Elm sprouts just fine and growing like weeds here. I don't know if Chinese Elm behaves (germination wise) like Cedar Elm though.

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  fiona on Tue Jan 24, 2012 3:18 pm

Interesting replies from Alabama, California and Texas.

However, geography isn't my strongest point but is Massachusetts not way oop north and therefore will have a much colder climate? Remember I know little of Massachusetts other than 1. they always seemed to be wearing cold weather gear in Cheers, and 2.the BeeGees seemed to rate it.

And if any of you young whippersnappers comes on and asks who the BeeGees are, I shall have to if not kill you then at least remove parts of your anatomy. But then again, that'd make you sound exactly like the BeeGees.

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Poink88 on Tue Jan 24, 2012 3:33 pm

Fiona,

I think the summary of our responses is that Elm does not seem to require too much cold stratification to germinate...since we have much milder winter temperatures and they do just fine naturally in our respective areas w/o any special treatment.

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  fiona on Tue Jan 24, 2012 3:50 pm

But would he be able to let them germinate outdoors as you guys have?

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Bob Pressler on Tue Jan 24, 2012 3:55 pm

fiona wrote:But would he be able to let them germinate outdoors as you guys have?

I did when in northern NJ which is only slightly less cold than MA

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  fiona on Tue Jan 24, 2012 4:07 pm

Thanks Bob. I think this is getting him towards an answer. I was really saying why clog up your fridge if your "outdoor one" does the job just as well? I almost never put seeds in the fridge - they go right outdoors or in a cold glasshouse in seed trays.

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  drgonzo on Tue Jan 24, 2012 5:08 pm

Chinese Elm needs no special stratification and can be planted fresh in fall, or just kept in a ziplock in a cool dark place and planted out in spring. The only member of the Elm family that is peculiar is U.americana which will delay its seeds germination for one year.
-Jay


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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Jesse McMahon on Tue Jan 24, 2012 5:28 pm

[quote="fiona"
And if any of you young whippersnappers comes on and asks who the BeeGees are, I shall have to if not kill you then at least remove parts of your anatomy. But then again, that'd make you sound exactly like the BeeGees. [/quote]

Laughing

And here I always thought it was just the pants of the period that made them sound that way. Wink I can get down with some BeeGees.

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  fiona on Tue Jan 24, 2012 6:04 pm

Jesse McMahon wrote:[quote="fiona"
And if any of you young whippersnappers comes on and asks who the BeeGees are, I shall have to if not kill you then at least remove parts of your anatomy. But then again, that'd make you sound exactly like the BeeGees.
Laughing And here I always thought it was just the pants of the period that made them sound that way. Wink I can get down with some BeeGees.[/quote] The pants of the period probably had a pretty similar effect to what I suggested. Laughing


Jay - thanks for your response. It was what I thought but not knowing the particulars of the climate I didn't want to say so outright.

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Russell Coker on Wed Jan 25, 2012 3:42 am



And not even so much as a thank you from "bring us a shrubbery".....

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  fiona on Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:00 am

Maybe because some of us said "it" in our answers?


Ni! Ni! Ni! Ni! Ni! Ni!

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Russell Coker on Wed Jan 25, 2012 2:10 pm

Yes, I noticed you did, more than once - and I hope that's the reason.

Although, personally, I don't let others do my thanking!

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  fiona on Wed Jan 25, 2012 2:42 pm

By eckyeckyecky ptangya Ziiinnggggggg !

And for those who have no clue what I am talking about and/or who didn't get the reference contained in Bring us a shrubbery:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTQfGd3G6dg

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Bob Pressler on Wed Jan 25, 2012 2:50 pm

Russell Coker wrote:

And not even so much as a thank you from "bring us a shrubbery".....
\
He actually said thanks in his post.


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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Poink88 on Wed Jan 25, 2012 2:52 pm

Bob Pressler wrote:
Russell Coker wrote:

And not even so much as a thank you from "bring us a shrubbery".....
\
He actually said thanks in his post.

...and in advance too! Very Happy

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Russell Coker on Wed Jan 25, 2012 2:53 pm


I say "NI" to you, old lady!

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  fiona on Wed Jan 25, 2012 2:58 pm

No doubt our Monty Python fan will respond in due course and we will be charitable in the meantime and recognise that there could be any reason for not doing so immediately - shift work, vacation whatever.

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Jesse McMahon on Wed Jan 25, 2012 3:02 pm

Clearly he wanted TWO shrubberies, only one slightly smaller so it would create a two level effect with a little path running down the center.

And what dark times are these, when Bonsai enthusiasts will say NI at will to old ladies!

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Re: Chinese elm

Post  Russell Coker on Wed Jan 25, 2012 3:17 pm

Jesse McMahon wrote: And what dark times are these, when Bonsai enthusiasts will say NI at will to old ladies!

Lol, sad indeed!

I hope you're right, Fi...

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Re: Chinese elm

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