Juniper progression

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Re: Juniper progression

Post  Vance Wood on Thu Jan 16, 2014 1:32 pm

Not that what I think matters a whole lot but I agree with you on all points. I too have been wrestling with the idea that sometimes we can make a tree look too perfect. Too often our close attention to manicured foliage pads leave the tree looking artificial. I don't know how to put it into words. The last photo shown in this thread is exactly how I think this tree looks right. It is manicured enough to establish the fact that the tree is mature and has room for the birds to fly through. I also know some artists could take this design and lay out an abundance of foliage pads and the tree would look great, it would be a masterpiece and it would be different. I prefer the more natural shape, it makes the tree show it's age with grace and dignity.

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Re: Juniper progression

Post  fiona on Tue Mar 18, 2014 3:12 pm

New pot for the juniper made by John Pitt.

When I posted this on Facebook, someone commented on how high it was sitting in the pot. When I was going through the repot process I started out with it a lot lower in the pot but it just did not look right to my eye. Hence why it is "up the hill". Also, I have pretty much decided in favour of growing the left side of the tree down as was suggested by Bonsai Kas and others, so I think with that in mind, the bit of extra height is okay.

Would be interested in others' thoughts though.

Real thing:




Rubbishy virt:



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Re: Juniper progression

Post  Vance Wood on Tue Mar 18, 2014 3:27 pm

I like the height it is planted but not every body cares about my opinion on things.  I also agree with bringing some of the design down a little on the left but I do not (MHO) think you should make the tree look like something growing along a road side park all full and trimmed out.  The trunk presents the image of age so should the foliage and the branch exposure.  After looking at it again I am not so sure that your original sin (the first picture) is not the best choice.  I think if you open up the foliage a bit more and tighten up what remains you will find a really spectacular tree waiting to happen.

From a cultivational point of view you could casually start by clipping out all growth the grows from the underside of the branches. This would help to open the tree up without actually causing a problem or controversy.


Last edited by Vance Wood on Tue Mar 18, 2014 7:18 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Juniper progression

Post  fiona on Tue Mar 18, 2014 7:10 pm

Quite agree. It will get a thinning out later in the summer and that will bring it in considerably. I am also mindful of the simple fact that if I go for growing the left side out, it will take quite some time.

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Re: Juniper progression

Post  Vance Wood on Tue Mar 18, 2014 7:15 pm

fiona wrote:Quite agree.  It will get a thinning out later in the summer and that will bring it in considerably.  I am also mindful of the simple fact that if I go for growing the left side out, it will take quite some time.
 "If" is a big word fraught with meaning.  You don't necessarily have to do that; a little more  dressing out the profile on the left side would go a loooooong way.  What is shown in the virtual is not necessary (IMHO) unless you desire to diminish the aged nature of the trunk----which I think would be a mistake.

What I think you could do now without difficulty is to cut all of the growth that is growing on the understide of all the branches.  This would go a long way in opening up the tree and letting the light in to strengthen the interior buds.

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Re: Juniper progression

Post  Gary Swiech on Tue Mar 18, 2014 10:42 pm

Quite agree. It will get a thinning out later in the summer and that will bring it in considerably. I am also mindful of the simple fact that if I go for growing the left side out, it will take quite some time.

+1

I like the picture above the last, where it's not leaning so much. I would try to develop the left side more, maybe a hanging branch also and thin it out more.

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Re: Juniper progression

Post  arihato on Tue Mar 18, 2014 10:51 pm

You said that the tree did not look right planted deeper in the pot, the might be because the pot at this size is too shallow, or at this depth is not wide enough.

I have been looking at the tree/pot combo repeatedly and this might be why.
Choosing pots for our trees is so personal that I hesitated to broach the subject........ Embarassed 

Apart from that I really like what you have done with the tree, it has now personality and presence.

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Re: Juniper progression

Post  Vance Wood on Wed Mar 19, 2014 12:23 pm

arihato wrote:You said that the tree did not look right planted deeper in the pot, the might be because the pot at this size is too shallow, or at this depth is not wide enough.

I have been looking at the tree/pot combo repeatedly and this might be why.
Choosing pots for our trees is so personal that I hesitated to broach the subject........ Embarassed 

Apart from that I really like what you have done with the tree, it has now personality and presence.

You have a point but this tree would not look the same and have the same dynamics if it were not planted the way it is. In nature you would see a tree like this on the top of a cliff. This poted situation makes that statement rather well. If you take the tree of the cliff you diminish the artistic statement of the tree. Just my opinion.

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Re: Juniper progression

Post  Angelo D on Wed Mar 19, 2014 5:06 pm

It's amazing how some of the virtuals (image on the right) are similar to Nick Lenz's larch (on the left)

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Re: Juniper progression

Post  Dan W. on Thu Mar 20, 2014 8:24 pm

Haha! I just opened this thread for the first time and Fiona's tree instantly reminded me of Nick's "Christian Larch." Then I scrolled to the bottom of the page....lol! Apparently I'm not the only one. Smile Nice juniper by the way.

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Re: Juniper progression

Post  Vance Wood on Tue Apr 22, 2014 2:12 pm

Fiona: I think you have reached a point in your bonsai adventure where you need to start trusting your own ideas and directions. It's OK to listen to suggestions, opinions, and advise from others it's another to take those things so seriously that it effects your ability to consider your own point of view as a viable option. I get some of the same responses you have received here about the way the tree is planted in the pot and it seems that we share the same concept of a tree on a hill.

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Re: Juniper progression

Post  Neli on Wed Apr 23, 2014 4:20 pm

Fiona I like the Christian Larch look. It balances the tree.

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Re: Juniper progression

Post  John Lee on Wed May 14, 2014 4:44 am

I think, for what it is worth, that it looks very natural the way it is planted and can't visualize it any other way. I wish it were mine.

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Re: Juniper progression

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