Help ID this tree from its leaves?

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Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  EpicusMaximus on Sun Oct 28, 2012 9:55 pm

Does anybody know what type of tree these leaves would be from? I don't currently have any pictures of the bark, but I would describe it as smooth and the tree in question had 2 trunks starting from the base.

Thanks in advance

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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  JimLewis on Sun Oct 28, 2012 11:00 pm

Growing in the wild or in a yard or park? How large are the leaves?

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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  JudyB on Sun Oct 28, 2012 11:08 pm

At first glance I'd say ash.

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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  BigDave on Sun Oct 28, 2012 11:30 pm

JudyB wrote:At first glance I'd say ash.

Yeah Judy, or dogwood


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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  0soyoung on Mon Oct 29, 2012 12:08 am

Definitely NOT ash. Ash has a compound leaf (technicality) with opposing leaflets. These leafs/leaflets alternate.

How about Pawpaw? If so, leaves ought to be big (upto 10 inches long).

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Tree ID?

Post  Robert Taylor on Mon Oct 29, 2012 12:25 am

How tall is the tree? I recently found a small understory tree with a similar leaf shape and structure. When the leaves were rubbed they gave off a strong and rather nice scent. A friend identified it as a spicebush.

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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  EpicusMaximus on Mon Oct 29, 2012 1:01 am

Tree was growing in the wild. The leaves are about 1.5 to 2 inches in size.

The bark was smooth but has white spots on it. This tree was growing amongst a family of birch. I actually cut it down to a stump and it's in a grow box now. I took it because it was going to be chopped down.

I've been searching online and the closest match I've found so far is glossy buckthorn...

http://ontariotrees.com/main/species.php?id=2023

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More on spicebush

Post  Robert Taylor on Mon Oct 29, 2012 2:36 am

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindera_benzoin

Lindera benzoin (wild allspice,[citation needed] spicebush,[1] common spicebush,[2] northern spicebush[3] or Benjamin bush[1]) is a flowering plant in the family Lauraceae, native to eastern North America, ranging from Maine to Ontario in the north, and to Kansas, Texas and northern Florida in the south.

The spice bush, also called Wild Allspice and Fever Bush, is scattered throughout the eastern United States. It seems to prefer damp woodlands or thickets in swampy ground, and sometimes reaches a height of 15 feet. This and another American species, the Downy Fever Bush which extends as far north as southern Illinois, are members of the Laurel Family that includes such aromatic trees and shrubs as sassafras, cinnamon, camphor, bay, avocado, and the true laurel. During the Civil War, soldiers brewed tea from the leathery leaves and the greenish rubbery twigs of the Benjamin bush. Oil of benzoin, or "benjamin", was extracted from it for home remedies but most commercial benzoin is now made from plants such as the sweet gum tree, a relative of the witch hazel. Long ago, woodsmen learned that spice bush is one of the few hardwoods which burn readily when green. The little flowers lack petals but each has six lemon yellow sepals and they are clumped in clusters which, with the fruit, make it an ornamental shrub. The fruit, which ripens in autumn and clings on through winter, is a bright red oval berry, rich in oil and highly scented.

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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  EpicusMaximus on Mon Oct 29, 2012 3:12 am

Thanks!

Now hopefully it survives the winter and that it can backbud.

It wasn't the right time of the year to get it, but it would have been dead next time the bulldozer came over.

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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  JimLewis on Mon Oct 29, 2012 12:26 pm

BigDave wrote:
JudyB wrote:At first glance I'd say ash.

Yeah Judy, or dogwood


Dogwood leaves are opposite.

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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  Guest on Mon Oct 29, 2012 2:15 pm

yes, could very well be Lindera. But, after some internet searching i'm still confused...

All the pictures i found of Lindera leaves showed me that they tend to have LESS leafnerves than the leaves on the pictures here enclosed. I always count about 4 to 5 apparant nerves, and the leaves here posted count 5 to 6 or 7 nerves. Also the leaf points of Lindera (mostly) dont seem to have this twist or curl at the tips.

Why i'd say Lindera, because of the bark/branches with white spots (lenticels) the poster is talking about.
Lindera leaves should smell of gasoline, hence the name benzoin, I dont know if the leaves should be handled for that. Now its a bit late to smell that since its fall ;-)

Rhamnus Frangula (here very common in europe, but not so common in the US, mostly in eastern states) does have these leaves with more leaf nerves, and sometimes we find this curled leaf tip (maybe also on Lindera but i could not easily find that); and also have these white spots on branches but not so on older trunks/bark. The R.Frangula bark smells (stinks) when rotten and you can get your hands real dirty by handling it, in dutch the name for R. Frangula would be literally translated in english as 'dirty tree' . So thats a good sign :-D

And...my original guess was Prunus padus actually Very Happy But only the P. Serotina is more common in america and has slightly serrulated leaves so this is not it.


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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  Russell Coker on Mon Oct 29, 2012 7:50 pm




Come on y'all! Both ashes and dogwoods have OPPOSITE leaves!

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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  Guest on Mon Oct 29, 2012 8:01 pm

Russell Coker wrote:


Come on y'all! Both ashes and dogwoods have OPPOSITE leaves!
i didnt even comment on it anymore, russell Wink

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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  Russell Coker on Mon Oct 29, 2012 11:08 pm



Sorry, but people who don't know the difference opposite and alternate leaves don't need to be giving identification advice...

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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  BigDave on Tue Oct 30, 2012 2:41 am

Russell Coker wrote:


Come on y'all! Both ashes and dogwoods have OPPOSITE leaves!


arrrrrr ...back to the pottery for me

Embarassed



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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  Russell Coker on Tue Oct 30, 2012 12:10 pm




Now THAT'S funny!

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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  abcd on Tue Oct 30, 2012 1:07 pm

diospyros kaki , diospyros lotus ?

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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

Post  Guest on Tue Oct 30, 2012 1:33 pm

abcd wrote:diospyros kaki , diospyros lotus ?

I dont think so, if you read the replies of the poster....a bark with white spots/speckles; that is clearly not the case with diospyros.

Epicus, tell us some more, do/did you find any fruit/berries (or whats left of that) underneath these shrubs/trees? or are all very very young trees that maybe dont fruit/flower. But that seems impossible because its hard to think that these trees had spread, but there not a single tree that fruit/flower.

cheers

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Re: Help ID this tree from its leaves?

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