Cherry Blossom

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Cherry Blossom

Post  alexisnoelle on Sat Apr 26, 2014 1:46 am

I am looking for a cherry blossom tree, if anyone has come across a good nursery or reliable online source for one Smile)

Some I've come across are
Prunus yedoensis
Prunus serrulata
Prunus sargentii
Prunus subhirtella
Prunus serrulata

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Re: Cherry Blossom

Post  JimLewis on Sat Apr 26, 2014 3:22 pm

Florida is a large state. Whereabouts are you? Prunis serrotina, at least, is not a decorative "flowering" cherry.

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Re: Cherry Blossom

Post  fiona on Sat Apr 26, 2014 3:28 pm

What level of experience do you have Alexis? Maybe some of the Floridians can tell us if Prunus incisa is a grower in Florida.

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Re: Cherry Blossom

Post  alexisnoelle on Sat Apr 26, 2014 6:04 pm

I am in central Florida, with moderate experience

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Re: Cherry Blossom

Post  alexisnoelle on Sat Apr 26, 2014 6:06 pm

Im looking for more of a flowering cherry

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Re: Cherry Blossom

Post  fiona on Sat Apr 26, 2014 7:57 pm

Prunus incisa "Kojo-no-mai" is an easy to grow flowering cherry over here. Maybe you guys don't have it. How about Prunus mahaleb.

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Re: Cherry Blossom

Post  JimLewis on Sat Apr 26, 2014 8:58 pm

You are in USDA hardiness zone 9, and few ornamental prunus do well down there. Your best bet will be to find a GOOD local nursery and ask if they ever carry any flowering cherries, apricots or almonds.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: Cherry Blossom

Post  William Feldman on Sun Apr 27, 2014 4:04 am

The University of Florida says that the Taiwan cherry, Prunus campanulata, is the most heat tolerant flowering cherry, and will grow in central Florida.
http://gardeningsolutions.ifas.ufl.edu/giam/plants_and_grasses/trees/taiwan_cherry.html

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Re: Cherry Blossom

Post  alexisnoelle on Sun Apr 27, 2014 4:23 am

Wow thanks everyone!!

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Re: Cherry Blossom

Post  alexisnoelle on Sun Apr 27, 2014 4:29 am

An issue I keep coming to with the cherry blossom research is the heat where I am, does anyone have any experience with artificial sunlight and indoor growing?

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Re: Cherry Blossom

Post  William Feldman on Sun Apr 27, 2014 5:41 am

Regarding Yoshino cherries like the ones in Washington, DC, I don't think the heat kills the tree.  My understanding is without a cold winter to make it go dormant, the tree doesn't bloom in the Spring and loses vigor over time.
http://www.al.com/living/index.ssf/2014/02/the_forbidden_cherry_why_youre.html

I have kept rooted cherry tree cuttings in my refrigerator for their first dormancy.  You could do the same thing with a small bonsai.  That may be more trouble than it's worth, though, when you consider that the flowering cherry is really only beautiful for one week out of the year.

Flowering cherries have a reputation for being difficult as Bonsai subjects.  From The Brooklyn Botanic Garden's Handbook on Dwarfed Potted Trees:
Japanese flowering cherries are so well known as to call for only brief men­tion. They are grown abundantly every­where in Japan, but it is very rare to come across them as bonsai. According to gen­eral opinion, they are among the most difficult trees to grow as bonsai, and this is strictly true except for a few experts who are always particularly fond of them.

...

As Japanese flowering cherries bloom gorgeously and abundantly each year, they make the most colorful bonsai, if grown well. Varieties with smaller flow­ers make more attractive bonsai than those with larger flowers. Consistency of scale is important!

Training. I hasten to say that the burned copper wire so much used in the training of bonsai is taboo in the culture of Japanese flowering cherries; it should never be used in their train­ing or put on them for any purpose. Anyone who ventures to use it on them finds that the branches soon die and consequently the tree becomes a sad sight.
The branches, roots, and rootlets must be cut very smoothly, with no ragged edges. Shears may be used; but some growers are careful to avoid using or­dinary pruning shears and use Japanese razors and knives instead. If a root is damaged, it will die and rot just as quickly as a branch.

...

Repotting is best done in March, be­fore the new growth starts. In repotting, very carefully wash off as much as pos­sible of the old soil or as much as seems best for the tree. Cut off smoothly any rotten roots and some of the older ones. If, for one reason or another, you cut off a lot of the roots, be careful to re­duce the branches in proportion, to keep the roots and top in balance.
The soil used is very porous; we bring it from the mountains. Stagnant water kills the roots of cherry tree bonsai and causes the plants to die.
Fertilizers are applied as to other bonsai—rape cake and the like.
Pests. Just as we favor flowering cherries, the insects are very fond of them, both in the air and in the soil. Beware of these.
 http://www.helpyourheart.info/pdbooksreports/Landscape/Dwarfed%20Potted%20Trees%20-%20The%20Bonsai%20of%20Japan2.doc

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Re: Cherry Blossom

Post  Russell Coker on Mon Apr 28, 2014 3:23 am



Will is correct. Taiwan cherry is your best bet. I have plenty if you want to try a couple.... but I've not found them to be easy in pots.

Russell

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Re: Cherry Blossom

Post  JimLewis on Mon Apr 28, 2014 1:55 pm

alexisnoelle wrote:An issue I keep coming to with the cherry blossom research is the heat where I am, does anyone have any experience with artificial sunlight and indoor growing?

They're unlikely to survive indoors. All cherries (Prunus sp.) I know of need a period of quite cold weather. There are too many other outdoor factors that can't be supplied indoors. I strongly suggest you go with Will's suggestion, and perhaps send an e-mail to IFAS (U of Fla.) asking for any other recommendations.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: Cherry Blossom

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