Japanese White Pine

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Japanese White Pine

Post  peter keane on Thu Feb 06, 2014 8:32 pm

Spent time this month with de-wiring, needle-cleaning and rewiring.  I've had this tree since 2006.  The first pic is shortly after getting it.  




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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  Dave Murphy on Thu Feb 06, 2014 9:10 pm

Very nice, Peter. Is this one grafted on JBP? If it is, I can't see it.

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  tmmason10 on Thu Feb 06, 2014 10:21 pm

Nice tree, I don't see a graft either. This is pretty good material for here in the US. The first branch seems a but large to me when I look at it though.

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Thu Feb 06, 2014 10:25 pm

And a big thank you to you,Peter.
Believe it or not, first time seeing how the length of the branchlets go into use, as seen in the last image.
Later.
Khaimraj

* Love it, wouldn't change anything.

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  giga on Fri Feb 07, 2014 3:01 pm

Looks great- I really need to add a white pine to my collection

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  Dan W. on Fri Feb 07, 2014 7:57 pm

Very nice! Great work Peter!

Tom, I think the graft is easier to see in the first image(if I'm seeing it correctly), just under the first branch. It looks like a very well done graft though and is paring up nicely

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  peter keane on Fri Feb 07, 2014 9:01 pm

Here's the history of the tree.

It was imported from Shikoku, Japan in the nineties, when there were little USDA restrictions on pine bonsai coming into the US.  I came across it while visiting Royal Bonsai Gardens, in Stoughton, MA in the summer of 2006.  It was being sold by Suthin Sukosolvisit for one of his students.  When I asked Suthin if the tree was a graft to JBP, or on its own rootstock, he told me that he was not sure.  In fact, I was told that he and David Easterbrook of Canada studied the tree for a graft seam that's usually found on white pine to black pine grafts, and neither were sure.  Also, the bark characteristics are continuous throughout the main trunk.  So, if it's grafted, it's an exceptionally good one since it's seamless.  If not, even better, because I've wanted a JWP on its own rootstock in my collection.  Thanks for all of your comments   Smile

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  Dan W. on Fri Feb 07, 2014 9:13 pm

That's awesome if it isn't! An incredibly rare find in America from what I've seen. Either way, it's a very nice tree.

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  William N. Valavanis on Fri Feb 07, 2014 9:37 pm

Just saw your bonsai Peter, looks GREAT!

The well hidden graft union is below the first branch. It was an excellent graft, typical of skilled Japanese propagators (not all propagators are skilled, even in Japan).

Yes, the bark looks continuous, but wait about 10 years. With healthy vigorous growth the Japanese black pine on the bottom might get stronger and begin to swell.

Well done, keep up the great work.

Are you preparing a bonsai for the selection process for the US National Bonsai Exhibition?

Bill

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  peter keane on Fri Feb 07, 2014 9:48 pm

Thanks, Bill.

I'd love to show this one if there's enough pad density between now and the Fall.  I think the shiny copper wire will be inconspicuous by then.

Peter

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  peter keane on Fri Jun 06, 2014 7:26 pm

Today.  


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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  bottasegreta on Fri Jun 06, 2014 8:59 pm

As someone with no pine experience these stylings always seem like magic to me....

Question: Did something happen to the first branch on the right (tree's left) between the first image and the second or did you decide to remove it?

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  Peter E. on Fri Jun 06, 2014 9:59 pm

No, i'm sorry, i do not get it.
I think you should remove the first branch to bring the tree back into balance.

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  Guest on Fri Jun 06, 2014 10:10 pm

Lovely pine, and very nice progression.

Removing the first branch, would be to remove the classic japanese traditon from the tree.
The tree would become modern, but to have a real classic styled tree, is something not many have...so think twice before doing anything about the branch...

Kind regards Yvonne

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  Dave Murphy on Fri Jun 06, 2014 10:13 pm

Yvonne Graubaek wrote:Lovely pine, and very nice progression.

Removing the first branch, would be to remove the classic japanese traditon from the tree.
The tree would become modern, but to have a real classic styled tree, is something not many have...so think twice before doing anything about the branch...

Kind regards Yvonne

I agree completely.

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  peter keane on Sat Jun 07, 2014 5:24 pm

Here's a virtual prune of that first branch.  Anti-climatic, ain't it?  I think the virtual looks like a table lamp.  

As for the first right branch in the unstyled image, I deliberately pruned it off.  Leaving it would have a branch in that area that was too long.  


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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  Guest on Sat Jun 07, 2014 9:05 pm

Wonder if it is possible to lower the first branch a little, it does look quit straight compared to the other branches.

Kind regards Yvonne

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  Gary Swiech on Sun Jun 08, 2014 3:14 pm

That is a very good graft. I have one where the graft has swelled over the years.

Nice white pine. I wouldn't remove that bottom branch but I might think of shortening it, if possible.

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  Gary Swiech on Sun Jun 08, 2014 3:23 pm

I did a quick virtual.


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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  Guest on Sun Jun 08, 2014 5:38 pm

Made a virtual too

The first branch lewered a little, and a new pot....


What do you think of this option?

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  peter keane on Mon Jun 09, 2014 5:25 pm

The first branch is too thick to bend safely.  I could put some saw cuts to force some movement in it.  But, I'd prefer to work with what's already there.  Shortening the foliage on it, though, is a good option, as is a shallower and longer pot.  These are good future considerations.

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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  marcus watts on Tue Jun 10, 2014 6:57 am

the branch would go down ever so easily if you really want to - it just needs a couple of strong guy wires and a length of rebar to use as a lever. the tree always needs to be properly wired into the pot before this type of work though - 2 or 3mm aluminium wire made very tight - otherwise it levers the tree up out of the pot rather than dropping the branch down. I would attach the lever and leave it in place while working, then aim to drop the branch over a 2 week period and I would definitely go far enough so the bark starts to tear open - this is the way to get the branch to set quickly and properly

i think the reason the bottom branch is not quite fitting with the rest of the tree is down to 2 things - it is virtually parallel to the soil level which always looks totally wrong on a conifer, and it is very straight.

If you dont fancy moving the branch down the other option is to take the over large bottom pad and restyle it into a series of layers - by making 3 sections to the foliage all on different levels you will break up the straightness - one section would be styled to hide some of the branch, one section at the level it is now and the outer section styled much lower. the outline to the pad will be stepped then, the tree will look more interesting and once the bottom branch is done the rest going up the tree can be layered to match. (the branch above needs the same treatment as it too is very straight and over visible).

Lovely tree, i would not use a wider pot as the last thing you want is to speed up the lower trunk growth and make a visible graft line appear.

cheers Marcus


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Re: Japanese White Pine

Post  Guest on Tue Jun 10, 2014 9:11 am

I was pleased to see your reply Marcus...explaining how to lower the first branch...with my poor written English would it have taken ages to put together this answer  Smile 

When this is said, do I not think a longer and lower pot is any difrent from a short deeper pot, when it comes dawn to the amount of soil...it is all a matter of taste, what the owner like/prefer...
Do the branchjob first, and repot afterwards.

Kind regards Yvonne

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Re: Japanese White Pine

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