peeling bark

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peeling bark

Post  bobby little on Tue Aug 11, 2009 6:08 pm



poor picture. sorry folks. This is an elm I've posted before - I believe it's quite old. I picked it up from a nursely from the bargian bin part for 30 quid. As you can see, the bark is peeling off. It's also very brittle, so I'm very hesitant to start wiring it. Any suggestions about the bark? Any potential solutions?

P.S. stop looking at my wifes' shapely thigh in the background or I'll thrash the lot of you's. Very Happy

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Re: peeling bark

Post  JimLewis on Tue Aug 11, 2009 6:15 pm

It looks like the wood may be rotting under the bark. That means the bark doesn't get rewed by living cambium, and it is simply getting old and worn and peeling away from the site.

I don't recall the tree from your earlier post, but I don't see anything here that would recommend keeping this in a pot. True rejuvenation (if it is possible) will ONLY come from putting it in the ground and leavig it alone for 5-10 years.

BTW, I usually complain about messy backgrounds behind a tree, but . . . . cyclops

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Re: peeling bark

Post  bobby little on Tue Aug 11, 2009 7:19 pm

Very Happy but if I move the tree you'll be able to see mrs bobby in all her glory. What a Face

what about a big training box? Or is the ground the only alternative? And can I plant it now or leave it til later in the year (worried that walter might give me a howking again for badly timed plantatage affraid )

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Re: peeling bark

Post  JimLewis on Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:24 pm

bobby little wrote:Very Happy but if I move the tree you'll be able to see mrs bobby in all her glory. What a Face

Well, it looks like she's clad.

what about a big training box? Or is the ground the only alternative? And can I plant it now or leave it til later in the year (worried that walter might give me a howking again for badly timed plantatage affraid )

The ground is always better -- especially for sick trees. Their roots can go where they will and suck up what they want. If you just take the tree, rootball and all, and plop it in a hole in the ground, you can do it any time. Fie on Walter. pirat

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RE. Peeling bark

Post  Guest on Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:55 pm

Im presuming this is a Chinese Elm? If it is thy tend to lose their bark in big flakes. Try nicking the bark underneath with the point of a knife to see if it has a green cambium layer, if it has it should be ok.

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Re: peeling bark

Post  bobby little on Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:57 pm

will baddeley wrote:Im presuming this is a Chinese Elm? If it is thy tend to lose their bark in big flakes. Try nicking the bark underneath with the point of a knife to see if it has a green cambium layer, if it has it should be ok.

I think it's a japanese grey bark elm. I'll jab it though and see.

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Re: peeling bark

Post  Kev Bailey on Tue Aug 11, 2009 10:20 pm

It amy well have been labelled Japanese Grey Bark Elm by the importers to get around restrictions on importing Chinese Elm into the country, but that is what it is, Chinese Elm. Zelkova serrata has a different leaf. I've had a couple of Ulmus parvifolia die back in patches when severely chopped. They look just like this one. I'd agree with Jims assessment and plant in the ground. You may well end up with an interesting rotted/callused trunk.

I'd also recommend putting a piece of slate or tile under it to keep the rootball shallow. Remember to water regularly if the weather is dry for the first year, at least.

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Re: peeling bark

Post  bobby little on Tue Aug 11, 2009 10:56 pm

ok. sounds like a plan. cheers once again chaps. one more thing. do I just neglect it now? The soil in my garden is rubbish, so do I feed it, and what about position er: light/shade?

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Re: peeling bark

Post  Harleyrider on Tue Aug 11, 2009 10:57 pm

Tree?.............. You mean there's a tree in the picture?

*goes back for another look*

OHHhh.That tree.

Yes. Very nice.

Very long limbs..........all smooth and.........

Nurse! The screens.

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