Ume, Japanese Apricot

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flowers beds on ume

Post  abcd on Mon Oct 15, 2012 8:25 am

Hello, the big problem with japanese apricots ume is tha the tree produce a lot off flowers beds and a little off limlbs beds.
KIMURA SENSEI explain that , in pot, you have to graft branches with limlbs beds if you want that tree don't die.
In france, tha year , all prunus ume without freezing protection died with temperatures : 5°F for 15 days in february.

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Re: Ume, Japanese Apricot

Post  fredtruck on Mon Oct 15, 2012 2:14 pm

I don't understand what is being said here.

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Re: Ume, Japanese Apricot

Post  abcd on Mon Oct 15, 2012 2:28 pm

Sorry, my english is very bad :
the big problem with mume is that the tree produces many flower buds and little leaves buds ( not beds ) .
KIMURA SENSEI explain that , in pot, you have to graft branches with limlbs buds if you don't graft branches with leaves buds, the tree don't grow correctly.



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Re: Ume, Japanese Apricot

Post  fredtruck on Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:25 pm

Thanks for the explanation, and no problem. There are times when I hardly understand what I'm saying myself.

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Re: Ume, Japanese Apricot

Post  tom tynan on Mon Oct 15, 2012 5:17 pm

Prunus species in the United States are available as cutting-grown material from a few sources - Camellia Forest is one on the East Coast. Evergreen Gardenworks on the West Coast. They both have many varieties and ship all over. The material is usually 1/4" to 1/2" in diameter. It is very common to see grafted Prunus sp. and sometimes you can find one where the graft is not bad - but I usually avoid the grafted material. My understanding is that in Japan they will graft a specific species - with a certain colored flower onto another prunus mume - in order to get that colored flower. Prunus species grow very fast and will have many leaves - by the late fall and early winter - the leaf buds for next year will differentiate from the flower bud - very easy to see. If the tree does not get flower buds - well then something has happened, ie. too young, too much pruning, heat stress, leaves dropped etc. There are many factors involved.......Tom

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Re: Ume, Japanese Apricot

Post  fredtruck on Mon Oct 15, 2012 9:20 pm

Peter Tea has an article called "Flowering Plum Basics" in which he describes the Japanese practice for working with ume. Here's a pertinent quote:

In Japan, most Flowering Plums are grafted early on in life. Since people want the flowers, they would take a branch that is know to flower from another tree and graft it to a young root stock. This way, the tree will immediately start blooming. Unlike other flowering trees that may take 1-15 years before they bloom, Flowering Plum is much more unpredictable. So far, it seems that a tree will start to bloom somewhere between 20 year and 100+ years! I know this to be true because we have a Flowering plum that was grown from seed in the yard that is over 100 years old and one of the lower branches still won’t bloom. This unpredictability is the reason why people tend to graft instead.
--Peter Tea

For me, this article answered the grafting issue with ume pretty well.

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Re: Ume, Japanese Apricot

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