Korean hornbeam

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Korean hornbeam

Post  Potter on Mon Nov 22, 2010 11:00 am

Hi folks, winter is about to set in up here in the cold north and my trees stand naked on the benches. I am about to do some work on one of my hornbeams and would love some creative input before I dig into it. Virtuals, pot for next year and so on. The tree is kind of wild and bushy so the plan is to clean it up and tighten up the image a bit. Any ideas are welcome.


Potter
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Korean hornbeam

Post  Guest on Mon Nov 22, 2010 11:52 am

Hi Potter.

Welcome to IBC!

thats a very old looking nice tree.

My only observation is the position of bar branches in the middle and base of the trunk... but when the tree got leaves, probably it wont look bothering much, but when presented in the defoliated form, it's so obvious.


regards
jun Smile

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: Korean hornbeam

Post  Gwyther on Mon Nov 22, 2010 12:16 pm

Hi Potter

Very nice Hornbeam. In the picture there looks to be a slight inverse taper, i would be inclined to let the very bottom branch on the left grow out unchecked for a while and that would possibly rectify this by thickening the trunk around it.

Here is a pot suggestion.




Vic Very Happy

Gwyther
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Korean hornbeam

Post  Potter on Mon Nov 22, 2010 5:36 pm

Thank you. Thats a nice pot, I might just try to copy that glaze.
I`ll start working on the tree tomorrow, tanks for your input.

Potter
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Korean hornbeam

Post  Todd Ellis on Tue Nov 23, 2010 2:44 am

Gwyther's thicker, earthy glazed pot (virtual) is the way to go. I think a wider pot with some rocks and accent foliage might work as well. I would consider growing out the foliage pads to increase the width of the canopy. although this is based soley on the photos; I 've not seen this tree in person. The tree seems too compact. It is lovely nonetheless. I would love to have a hornbeam with this type of ramification!
Salut, Todd

Todd Ellis
Member


Back to top Go down

virtual sketch

Post  jonathan e on Wed Nov 24, 2010 1:36 am

Great so far! Here's my two humble cents. You could simplify the branching and begin bending the major branches upward. Shorten all the long, straight parts. A slight alteration of the planting angle and a wide, shallow pot. These excellent beginnings can move toward a more natural-looking form.

[img][/img]

hope you like it,
-jonathan

jonathan e
Member


Back to top Go down

or maybe this one is better...

Post  jonathan e on Wed Nov 24, 2010 1:43 am

some slight alterations from the last one



-jonathan

jonathan e
Member


Back to top Go down

Korean hornbeam

Post  moyogijohn on Tue Nov 30, 2010 1:05 am

Please befor you do any chopping on this tree,,,Send it to me,,,,very nice bonsai.. I really like the base,I do agree the left bottom branch could be longer..take care john

moyogijohn
Member


Back to top Go down

Carpinus

Post  dorothy7774 on Tue Nov 30, 2010 2:42 am

The lack of nebari on the left can be balanced by a suitable rock (genuine or built). Perhaps one would consider growing a new central apex area. I am not good at words, this is what I mean. Nice tree:



How it was achieved:



-dorothy Wink


dorothy7774
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Korean hornbeam

Post  Potter on Tue Nov 30, 2010 7:46 pm

Thank you for your very good suggestions, and the time you put down. I did some cutting and pruning yesterday. I will post some pics tomorrow, too "#$&% cold outside today. pale It´s the coldest November since 1919!!

Potter
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Korean hornbeam

Post  MIKEB on Tue Nov 30, 2010 10:20 pm

Really nice tree, the bar branches dont bother me, But I would suggest cleaning the moss off the bark. Please correct me if i am wrong, but the moss is parasitic and it does cause harm to the bark and cambium. i know we like it cuase it makes the tree look old, but for the overall health of the tree i think it should be removed.

MIKEB
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Korean hornbeam

Post  JimLewis on Wed Dec 01, 2010 1:07 am

Slight correction:

Moss is not parasitic. It does damage bark, however, because it traps moisture underneath it. It's always wise to get it off bark -- especially on smooth-barked trees.

_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

JimLewis
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Korean hornbeam

Post  Sponsored content Today at 2:19 pm


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum