Zone 9 and or Southern Texas bonsai

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Zone 9 and or Southern Texas bonsai

Post  NeilDellinger on Wed May 19, 2010 11:53 pm

Wondering if anyone out there is growing in this area of the US? Or just in Zone 9a or 9b???

Maybe facing a move and would like to hear from someone out there on what they are growing.

Thanks everyone!

NeilDellinger
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Re: Zone 9 and or Southern Texas bonsai

Post  Russell Coker on Thu May 20, 2010 12:35 am

Neil,

It's not a bad place to be. Most everything is fine, except larch, spruce and things like that. I grow azaleas, ficus (with protection) and some other tropicals, elms, maples, apricots, camellias, hornbeams and boxwoods. Red and black pines are fine too. Email or PM me if you're wondering about particulars.

Russell

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Re: Zone 9 and or Southern Texas bonsai

Post  EdMerc on Thu May 20, 2010 1:35 am

This is mostly about bonsai in Central Florida, but most of it should translate to Texas (zone 9ab).
zone9bonsai.com

Good luck,
Ed

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Re: Zone 9 and or Southern Texas bonsai

Post  Rob Kempinski on Thu May 20, 2010 3:23 am

NeilDellinger wrote:Wondering if anyone out there is growing in this area of the US? Or just in Zone 9a or 9b???

Maybe facing a move and would like to hear from someone out there on what they are growing.

Thanks everyone!

There are many varieties but not that many that Japanese grow. Chinese varieities and tropical would do well,

Rob Kempinski
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Re: Zone 9 and or Southern Texas bonsai

Post  NeilDellinger on Thu May 20, 2010 4:34 am

Thanks Guys. I did an online climate comparison with Orlando, FL & Mcallen, TX. Nearly identical temperatures from month to month. Of course one is likely drier. But, it looks as though folks in Orlando grow black pine, shimpaku and especially trident maples pretty well...as well as most elms.

Russell,
Looks like Mobile, AL is on average about 8 degrees cooler. Not a huge swing.

Rob,
Any input regarding tridents. I have seen you post several Japanese Black Pine but do not recall any tridents or shimpaku.

Thanks for the help,
Neil

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Re: Zone 9 and or Southern Texas bonsai

Post  irene_b on Thu May 20, 2010 6:17 am

I grow Tridents as well as black pines here.

irene_b
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Re: Zone 9 and or Southern Texas bonsai

Post  Russell Coker on Thu May 20, 2010 1:27 pm

Russell,
Looks like Mobile, AL is on average about 8 degrees cooler. Not a huge swing.


Neil, that's very true. Summers are about the same, I just have more winter - if you can call it that. Most people here who endure temps that I can't even imagine would laugh at what we call "winter", BUT it does allow us to grow things that pout just a few hours to the south. Rob and Ed Trout brought up a couple of beautiful elms and pines to New Orleans last summer, but I'm curious about the tridents and shimpaku too.

I'm on the north/south edge for a lot of material, luckily. I do love those spruce and larch especially, but I'm content to admire from afar!

Russell


Last edited by Russell Coker on Thu May 20, 2010 2:33 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Zone 9 and or Southern Texas bonsai

Post  Rob Kempinski on Thu May 20, 2010 1:42 pm

I am on the east coast of FLorida so between zone 9 and 10.
Japanese Black Pine thrive for me. Tridents and Maples do not last long in my microclimate. Satsuki live about 5 years then give up the ghost.

Rob Kempinski
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Re: Zone 9 and or Southern Texas bonsai

Post  jferrier on Fri May 21, 2010 10:02 pm

Rob:
I'm here in Fort Worth Zone 8. Not quite as far south as McAllen so we have colder winters, but get the similar very hot dry nasty summers. Get ready for the possibility of 3 months of 100 degree weather and little rain.here, I've not had any success with Scots pines, moderate success with JB pines, but pretty good luck with Pinion pines. I've had no problems with Japanese or Trident maples but have to water very frequently. Also good luck w/ quinces, cedar elms, and true cedars do very well. I've also been interested in Texas purple sage or leucophyllum frutescens. They are native to Texas deserts, have nice small bluish green leaves, and produce small purple flowers generally only after summer rains. They develop very nice gnarled roots and trunks and are very drought tolerant and do best in poor rocky soils.

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Re: Zone 9 and or Southern Texas bonsai

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