Carving a lot of wood

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Re: Carving a lot of wood

Post  rock on Sat Oct 17, 2009 12:55 am

Dave Murphy wrote:The majority of the inexpensive Harbour Freight items are low end, mediocre quality tools made in China...that's why they are cheap. The saying "you get what you pay for" applies here. I coughed up the $200 plus price to get the Makita variable speed die grinder last year. Sure, it was expensive, but it easily does whatever is asked of it and I will hopefully never have to replace it because it is well made and built to last.

Dave

I agree completely Dave

On the tools that I use daily or weekly. I got all top of the line, but sometimes you need a tool or occasionally or that you can't afford , that's when I check out Harbor freight.

For instance, I spray a lot of glazes my pottery business, so instead of buying one top-of-the-line gravity feed sprayer, I get 6 Harbor freight sprayers. Now I have one for each color of glaze. the sprayers work perfectly. Because if they don't --I take it right back to get another one.

anyway you get my drift

later Dave
Rock


Last edited by Rock on Sat Oct 17, 2009 12:57 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : blad spelling)

rock
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Re: Carving a lot of wood

Post  Dale Cochoy on Sun Oct 18, 2009 8:53 pm

I specialize in power wood carving tool sales in the USA. I sell pretty much all the tools show that are made in the USA and I import from Europe. I also sell die grinders and cutters for Dremel-types and right angle grinders. I don't believe anyone in the USA has the stock I do of power wood carving tools for bonsai. If you've seen me at conventions....you know!
In regards to die grinders, dremel-types and right angle grinders, If you buy Chinese you will be sorry! Period. They are junk power tools and will not last! The 'copy' chinese die grinders ( look just like Makita) sound like they have square bearings! I once talked to a Ca. dealer who sold them like crazy for $20 and he told me 20% of them did not work out of the box...but, he got them cheap. Upon checking one for 1/4" bits I found that they didn't fit in the Chinese collets. I've used variable speed 'dremel-type' that were chinese and they sounded pitiful compaired to my 25 yr old Dremel!
As for the best Die Grinders FOR OUR USE ( read bonsai) I recommend the Makita and DeWalt with the 'Dead Man Switch' which shuts off the grinder if you let go. These are the safest in my opinion. Quality is excellent, although there are many quality die grinders or similar tools. I just handle Makita and DeWalt. The Aliminum body COMMERCIAL model Makita is TOUGH and the variable speed Makita is all-purpose and wonderful ( but the most expensive). The variable speed model is especially nice with sanding flap wheels or wire wheels which are, for the most part, not rated very high. Although I do sell high rated German wire wheels.
The new Arbortech Mini-Grinder is also a very nice tool especially when fitted with the Samurai wood carver ( we can do that now).
4" Right angle grinders with burr wheels, chain saws or Arbortech wheels are all SERIOUS cutters!!
The two BEST wood carvers , in my opinion, that I use are the SAMURAI and the NINJA MASTER.
Also, very good for heavy removal, and cheap, are Frued and Whiteside CORE BOX router bits, although, watch out! They can take off on you.
A good thing to think about when buting carving cutters as a newbie is, basically, the less cutting heads, the more difficult to control . Exampe, the router bits with two cutting heads are more difficult than Samurai with 5 and burrs or milling tools with several cutting faces are the esiest for newbs.

the basic law I tell everyone:
DO NOT TALK to anyone while carving or, ALLOW ANYONE to talk to you! If someone insists then stop your tool and carry on the conversation.

Thay can be, and are , dangerous and you can be hurt in the blink of an eye!

Speaking of....don't carve anything without glasses or some face protection.

Dale ( I don't just do pots) Cochoy

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Re: Carving a lot of wood

Post  waway on Wed Oct 21, 2009 6:45 am

With regards to beaver tools its almost like impossible to obtain from where I am. May I ask what would be my best alternative bit to use for wood carving that can have the same effect? I'm hesitant of using router bits as they told me that its risky and dangerous. And also I was thinking of using the concealed hinges bits to carve shallow holes on big scars then refine it using a rotary tool.

Why do we have limited supplies of gadgets and tools... Crying or Very sad

waway
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Re: Carving a lot of wood

Post  Tony on Wed Oct 21, 2009 8:45 am

Beaver tools are available worldwide via their website... this is how I buy my tools
this is my favourite:

http://www.beaverbonsaitools.com/en/fresas/fresa3.html

Tony

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Re: Carving a lot of wood

Post  landerloos on Wed Oct 21, 2009 9:42 am

Tony wrote:Beaver tools are available worldwide via their website... this is how I buy my tools
this is my favourite:

http://www.beaverbonsaitools.com/en/fresas/fresa3.html

Tony

I did see it in action and the next tool I buy is one of those.
As Tony already stated he sends all over the world, just send him a mail and ask after shipping.

Peter

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Re: Carving a lot of wood

Post  Rob Kempinski on Wed Oct 21, 2009 4:00 pm

I have tried many different carving tools over the years.

For heavy duty removal try a metal shop type angle grinder with the Lancelot circular chair saw. However this will leave a very rustic surface that will need follow up with smaller tools.

Harbor Freight sells (via Mail order or in regional stores) several inexpensive electric die grinders amde in Asia. If you are not going to do a lot of carving they should do the trick rather inexpensively. I have a couple and leave different size bits in them. My favorite for rough hogging of wood is the Samurai bit sold by Dale Cochoy.


I also have a Foredom tool with three different hand pieces all with different bits. It saves time in that the Foredom allows one to quickly change the hand piece without having to mess around with a wrench to change the bit. The tool is stronger than the Dremel but not as strong as a die grinder and more expensive.

The Makita tool is a mid range quality tool available at most Home Improvement stores but if you are only doing a little bit of carving the Harbor Freight brand should work well and save money.

Also you really can't avoid not using some hand tools to make a nicely detailed surface. What you get depends on budget and personal preference. Flexicut sells carving kits that are reasonably priced and are a good way to get a set of decent and capable hand carving tools.

BTW if you have never used an electric carving tool before please pay attention to the safety information that accompanies the tool. Sharp bits spinning at 18,000 rpm can't distinguish between flesh and wood. Also safety googles and dust masks are good equipment to purchase.

Rob Kempinski
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Re: Carving a lot of wood

Post  Michael T on Wed Oct 21, 2009 5:22 pm

This has been a helpful thread. Thank you all.

Michael T
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Re: Carving a lot of wood

Post  Dale Cochoy on Wed Oct 21, 2009 5:31 pm

What Rob said....
except for the Chinese power tool part.
my opinion still....skip chinese power tools and spend a bit more.
Ditto on Makita 'mid-range quality'. There are better made die grinders. The Makita basic model is STILL the most seen in bonsai though. Price, shape and size make it perfect for us. As I said before, I really like the model with the dead-man switch as DeWalt also has.
Foredom definitely nice tools, although expensive. But, my problem with them( which is why I seldom use mine )is that it is not as portable as a die grinder. You almost need a dedicated place to work using them where it can be hung. I've seen many ways of hanging them ( overhead hooks and planter hangers) but the fact remains it's difficult to carry around with you and use elsewhere. But, if you only carve in one spot, ....a great tool.

My the Beavertool looks familiar! Rolling Eyes

D.

Dale Cochoy
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Re: Carving a lot of wood

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