american chestnut

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american chestnut

Post  Mitch - Cedarbog on Thu Feb 07, 2013 1:10 am

Hey guys. I came across an article about maximum sizes chestnuts have been able to achieve historically and as I read this article, using American chestnut as bonsai came to mind. If it is possible, where can the original species be found and hypothetically, can the fungus that killed them off affect them in pot culture

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Re: american chestnut

Post  Hoo on Thu Feb 07, 2013 2:05 am

I think there are many "original" species of Carya native to NA. The shagbark is found all over Ohio. I'm sure with a little investigating you could find one and gather some seeds. Think they're pretty resistant to disease, though I don't know how well trees with large taproots do as bonsai... I'm pretty knew to all this.

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Re: american chestnut

Post  Vance Wood on Thu Feb 07, 2013 2:08 am

I remember reading a couple of years ago that a disease resistant strain of American Chesnut had been developed from some of the surviving juvenile trees. It is unknown if this is true but it sure would be nice.

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Re: american chestnut

Post  Hoo on Thu Feb 07, 2013 2:12 am

Vance, if you google american chestnut engineering or blight you'll find a bunch of articles on that. I remember reading one about an individual who was breeding resistent species on her (I believe a her) property with great success.

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Re: american chestnut

Post  Hoo on Thu Feb 07, 2013 2:14 am

http://shop.acf.org/annual-sponsor-seed-distribution.aspx

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Re: american chestnut

Post  Mitch - Cedarbog on Thu Feb 07, 2013 2:18 am

Hoosteady wrote:http://shop.acf.org/annual-sponsor-seed-distribution.aspx
Too late. Today is February 6th.

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Re: american chestnut

Post  Vance Wood on Thu Feb 07, 2013 2:20 am

Hoosteady wrote:Vance, if you google american chestnut engineering or blight you'll find a bunch of articles on that. I remember reading one about an individual who was breeding resistent species on her (I believe a her) property with great success.

Good to hear. From my personal experience I worked for many years in finishing and repairing high end finishes on furniture and sometimes wooden floors, which I avoided like the plague. However; I had an experience of doing some repair on a Chestnut floor. It would seem that people are going into the old forests of these trees and harvesting the now fallen remains of these magnificent trees. I guess the wood is highly rot resistant and the hundred year old wind falls are still pretty good for cabinet work. Beautiful wood incidentally.

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Re: american chestnut

Post  Mitch - Cedarbog on Sat Feb 09, 2013 4:00 am

Mitch - Cedarbog wrote:Hey guys. I came across an article about maximum sizes chestnuts have been able to achieve historically and as I read this article, using American chestnut as bonsai came to mind. If it is possible, where can the original species be found and hypothetically, can the fungus that killed them off affect them in pot culture

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Re: american chestnut

Post  Guest on Sat Feb 09, 2013 7:12 am

Mitch - Cedarbog wrote:
Mitch - Cedarbog wrote:Hey guys. I came across an article about maximum sizes chestnuts have been able to achieve historically and as I read this article, using American chestnut as bonsai came to mind. If it is possible, where can the original species be found and hypothetically, can the fungus that killed them off affect them in pot culture

Mitch, I dont have any experience with chestnut but anything that will affect a full size tree is going to impact on a bonsai of the same type.. If your really keen to grow one hunt out some resistant stock. Good luck.

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Re: american chestnut

Post  Mitch - Cedarbog on Sat Feb 09, 2013 1:54 pm

That's no5 always the case. As far as I am aware, Dutch elm disease does not affect bonsai specimens of the same species since the flight path of the beetle is above 15 feet, ect
So having that said, does the chestnut blight have the same way of affecting or is it easily controlled through our typical methods of treatment(Bayer 3n1, fungicide, been, ect) I am more of a "full blooded" tree species type, what I mean is I want the American chestnut, not a cross.

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Re: american chestnut

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