Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

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Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

Post  Chris Cochrane on Wed Jun 17, 2009 3:10 pm

New Zealand friend & Tokyo resident Jeff Amas shares the following illustrations of the recent Meihin exhibit at the Meiji Shrine in Tokyo...




What do you think of this suiseki, suiban, footed table & companion plant (or perhaps 'accent plant') combination?


Last edited by Chris Cochrane on Fri Jun 28, 2013 1:20 pm; edited 4 times in total (Reason for editing : change 2009 exhibition thread's title to read as others in photo series)

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Re: Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

Post  Chris Cochrane on Wed Jun 17, 2009 3:22 pm

Others...





If limestone (as it appears), this is distinctly different from the Furya-ishi & Seigaku-ishi typically associated with Japanese suiseki...

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Re: Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

Post  Chris Cochrane on Wed Jun 17, 2009 3:27 pm

More...






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Re: Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

Post  Chris Cochrane on Wed Jun 17, 2009 3:35 pm

Three exhibited stones in trays...






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Re: Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

Post  Leonid on Thu Jun 18, 2009 10:23 am

Many thanks for remarkable excursion! Many stones are really magnificent!
Concerning a composition with a plant, in my opinion, idea good, but the pot with a plant is located too far from a stone...

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Re: Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

Post  chansen on Thu Jun 18, 2009 2:19 pm

Chris -

Many thanks for sharing these stones. They are wonderful and are getting me excited for my trip out to the Shenandoah next week.

You asked about thoughts on the display with the waterfall stone and the accent plant.

First, do my eyes deceive me, or is that a stone from the Yoshimura and Covello text? I believe the suiban is also the same as in the book.

The display table is not a distraction to me, although I think other displays feel more 'together.' I think the accent plant is not quite right either. The visual weight it carries is so close to that of the stone that they compete for my attention more than compliment. I would rather see something with a lower profile. Maybe a moss of some sort? In my mind, the foot of a waterfall is covered in slippery moss, constantly wet from the spray of the water. I don't usually associate grasses and waterfalls, although others have probably had different experiences that I.

The scene in my mind where the grass would fit would have to include a larger waterfall stone (maybe 2x-2.5x as visually heavy as the one here), and a greater distance between the objects. I can see a grassy meadow springing from the waters of the stream/river from the falls, but there would need to be greater distance for it to 'work' for me.

Thanks for sharing the stones. They are great examples for us to work from. Hopefully my trip next week yields some success.

Christian

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Re: Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

Post  Chris Cochrane on Thu Jun 18, 2009 5:15 pm

Brilliant catch, Christian. Thank you so much.

Feeling the warmth of a stone extended from Yuji Yoshimura's 1984 text to a 2009 Meihinten exhibit means a lot to me. Yuji's brother Ken'ichi has passed away (last year, I think), but his son Ikki has been added to the Nippon Suiseki Association board. Perhaps Ikki Yoshimura selected the stone & its traditional seating-- likely, the pairing was determined long ago (perhaps chosen by Ikki's grandfather). The stone is likely owned by someone with wealth, and perhaps the suiban is owned or rented for exhibits.

In the book, this suiseki (p. 49) is identified as a ‘sheet-waterfall’ named "Dragon's Head" (height 12” or 30 cm). It is a wonderfully rich & transformative Japanese literati allusion bringing to mind the 'transformed carp/accredited scholar' and 'transformed snake/protector from North & East directions' associated with the spirit of a sheet-waterfall. This can be a deep source for appreciation of stones in exhibit and alcove display.

The plant might be intended as an accent to the exhibit (a separate object) rather than a companion to this stone. If intended as an companion plant, it is much too massive and tall to be effective. Excepting the reach of a single bloom, companion plants are traditionally lower than the top surface of a footed table holding a bonsai or suiseki. Perhaps, that partially accounts for Japanese exhibit tables being taller than those chosen for most Western exhibits. Informal literati feeling can be enhanced by choice of table or mat, & perhaps it explains the low table which enhances looking across the suiban. With a less massive & shorter companion plant, the scenic view would be enhanced.

I would wish you the luxury of viewing the Keido tapes (2 VCR set), Christian. It would be great to see them with you (hint!)… Wink The host in this series at one point invites the viewer to enjoy a waterfall stone. In a generous alcove setting allowing considerable distance from the stone is a modest shore-side plant. The scene & atmosphere between & beyond them is readily filled imaginatively.

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Re: Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

Post  Chris Cochrane on Sun Jun 21, 2009 3:08 pm

Jeff was either reading my mind or perhaps visited the thread. I received a few additional photos, yesterday-- more photos of the suiseki, bonsai & accent plants gracing the outdoor section of the Meihinten exhibit. Perhaps, photos were not allowed for the indoor display; you would know to ask a monitor (several NSA directors & vendors in attendance) before snapping shots, there. The weather-exposed outdoor exhibit space also explains some disarray of the table covers.

One new photo from Jeff perhaps answers the question of whether the plant discussed above was intended as a companion or an accent plant. I'll first show Jeff's photo at an oblique angle across the exhibit, then show 2 photos I took 5 years ago facing the exhibition from a distance across the Meiji Shrine's large side courtyard. I recalled exhibition accent plants placed at corner turns to stop & rest the eye; those were large. Jeff's photo reveals smaller plants (though still apparently exhibit accents) placed at regular intervals to separate individual displays.


In my photos, you’ll see an occasional plant tucked closer to one suiseki than to the next object. Perhaps (& my assumption), these are companion plants to individual objects as opposed to exhibition accent plants. Though I attended day-after-day to closely observe the stones, I never closely questioned the rational for plant placement, so my interpretation is speculative.


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Re: Meiheiten 2009

Post  Guest on Fri Jun 26, 2009 2:02 am

I was very fortunate to attend the 49th Meiheiten on its last day.
The displays were great as usual and if you did not leave the show with a feeling of envy, you are not a fanatical suiseki collector.
To me the great surprise was the number of non-Japanese Nippon Suiseki Association members whose stones were selected for display.
I would like to congratulate the following members:
Igor Barta - Chech Republic
Jose Manuel Blazquez - Spain
Thomas Elias - USA
Rafael Monje - Spain
Martin Pauli - Swiss
Wil (posts from Japan) - USA
6 entries out of the 79 selected and displayed is a great showing and proof that suiseki is no longer the exclusive domain of the Japanese.  

Cheers.

Peter Aradi
San Antonio, Texas


Last edited by Chris Cochrane on Sat May 10, 2014 2:36 pm; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : request from IBC member)

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Re: Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

Post  Chris Cochrane on Fri Jun 26, 2009 6:21 pm

Hi Peter... Thanks for an update of foreign collectors stones at the recent (49th) Meihinten. Are you still in Japan? Can you post related photos?

Perhaps, IBC contributor Jose Manuel Balazquez will add more in regard to entering a stone. I think each stone is sponsored by a Nippon Suiseki Association director and many are the stones of good clients. Did you note if any foreigner's stone was of Japanese origin? Owners pay a tidy sum to have their stone exhibited and photographed, and I think there is more than one level (some stones considered important receive larger photos). If like the Soguten, owners are invited to a banquet with Nippon Suiseki Association directors some days following the mounting of the exhibition. I expect each owner is invited to a meal & ritual performance within the sacred precincts of the Meiji Shrine where only Shinto adherents are normally allowed. That is quite an experience.

I'm aware of foreign stones & collectors exhibiting in the 28th Meihinten (1988) though there might be earlier examples. The 1988 exhibit included stones from the collections of John Naka (Kern River stone), Larry & Nina Ragle (Kings River stone), Marybel Balendonck (Trinity River stone) & Harry Hirao (Eel River stone). Martin Pauli (Switzerland), Sean Smith (USA), David Sampson (UK) & Harold Lehner (Germany) are among foreign collectors who have exhibited stones in the past Meihinten-- I apologize to those I left out and, perhaps, someone will complete the list.

I'll ask Tom Elias about his entry & experience when an opportunity arises & share his response.

Exhibitor Wil promises to post articles in future California Aiseki Kai newsletters, and I'm anxiously awaiting his thoughts and discoveries.

Did you see any stone friends when visiting the Meihinten, Peter?

Another 49th Meihinten exhibit photo


Last edited by Chris Cochrane on Mon Jul 13, 2009 7:29 pm; edited 2 times in total

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Re: Meiheiten 2009

Post  Guest on Sat Jun 27, 2009 6:24 pm

Chris:

Our trip was primarily to see my wife's family and ailing mother. We did manage to get away for few days of religious pilgrimage to Kyoto and Fukui.
However, we did start our trip with a visit to the 49th Meiheiten in Tokyo and ended it by buying two stones from my favorite stone dealer in Kyoto.
When I reset my body clock, I will try to photograph my new additions to the collection.

Cheers.

Peter Aradi

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Re: Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

Post  spanish-suiseki-associati on Sun Jul 05, 2009 10:09 pm

Dear Peter,

Thank you very much for your congratulations.

We are trying to do our best in Spain and now we are ready to have the II Suiseki Exhibition of Spain, in October 2009. I would like to invite all of you.

I would like to share some pictures of the Rafael Monje' stone and my stone:









Both stones have been found in San Sebastian (Spain) and both daiza have been made by Rafael Monje.

Best regards,
Jose Manuel Blazquez
Spanish Suiseki Association

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Re: Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

Post  spanish-suiseki-associati on Sun Jul 05, 2009 10:40 pm

Dear Chris,

As far as I know, at least in our case, we had to send some pictures to pass the initial selection, after that we had to pay a fee to participate in the exhibition. In addition, Rafael Monje and I were members of the Nippon Suiseki Association.

Unfortunately, I haven't more pictures because I couldn't attend personally in Tokyo and the pictures were taken by my friend Wil.

Best regards,
Jose Manuel Blazquez.


Last edited by spanish-suiseki-associati on Mon Jul 13, 2009 9:31 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

Post  Chris Cochrane on Thu Jul 09, 2009 8:52 pm

California Aiseki Kai has posted its latest newsletter. An article by Wil on the recent Meihin exhibit supplements many of the areas covered in the IBC thread & adds photos of stones displayed inside. Very nice photos and explanations! Folks who read this newsletter regularly should subscribe...
California_Aiseki_Kai_newsletter

Jim Greaves article on small stones is very good, as well.


Last edited by Chris Cochrane on Thu Jul 16, 2009 10:34 pm; edited 2 times in total

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Re: Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

Post  spanish-suiseki-associati on Mon Jul 13, 2009 9:35 pm

Dear Chris,

Thank you very much for the link. It is really interesting about Meihin exhibition.

Best regards,
JMB

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Re: Nippon Suiseki Meihinten 2009- photos by Jeff Amas

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