FALL collection of Yamadori

Page 1 of 2 1, 2  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

FALL collection of Yamadori

Post  gax on Tue Sep 21, 2010 3:32 pm

Hello,

I understand that in general it is preferred to collect trees in the Spring as they have a growing season to recover. Has anyone had success collecting trees in the fall?

gax
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: FALL collection of Yamadori

Post  Guest on Tue Sep 21, 2010 4:20 pm

Hi Gax

Yes, both Pinus sylvestris, Scots Pine and Crataegus, Hawthorn I have collected with good results in fall. If fall collected trees are stored in a protected place keeping them from freezing if possible, they will have a great survival rate.

Regards
Morten Albek

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: FALL collection of Yamadori

Post  Ingvar Nilsson on Tue Sep 21, 2010 6:35 pm

I've been thinking about timing for fall collecting and repotting. In spring, the tree shows evidence when it's the right time to collect but how about autumn? How can you tell when it's time?

Ingvar Nilsson
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: FALL collection of Yamadori

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Tue Sep 21, 2010 6:47 pm

OK, Sweden and Denmark, it is OK to collect in Fall, here in Florida we collect in January.

Location, location, location

Billy M. Rhodes
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: FALL collection of Yamadori

Post  Guest on Tue Sep 21, 2010 8:08 pm

Billy M. Rhodes wrote:OK, Sweden and Denmark, it is OK to collect in Fall, here in Florida we collect in January.

Location, location, location

Of course location is an important issue. I address my answer to how the question is asked, and I am sure Florida is quite different in this case (but the asked question was not from Florida I think - correct me if I am wrong?). But I am also sure that the forum readers takes their location into account when asking and answering. I newer answer questions about issues that has a location influence that differs much from were I live, because it has no meaning. I might have overlooked it in this case (the location was not specified clearly) but think the question addresses the right kind of answer. I hope this is understandable.

Regards
Morten Albek


Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: FALL collection of Yamadori

Post  gax on Tue Sep 21, 2010 8:17 pm

Hello everyone,

Thanks for all of the responses. I was meaning my question to be general, just looking to see what peoples experiences were. Thank you all for the replies! I will have to experiment with Fall collecting.

Regards

gax
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: FALL collection of Yamadori

Post  Seth Ellwood on Wed Sep 22, 2010 1:58 am

Last fall I collected a Japanese hornbeam in november 1 week after leaf drop, a pyracantha, and a chalkbark maple. I also cut back in nursery pots a zelkova,crape myrtle,washington hawthorn,trident maple,corkbark elm, japanese hawthorn,and dug a butterfly japanese maple in december. All of them survived and thrived this year.

Seth Ellwood
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: FALL collection of Yamadori

Post  Todd Ellis on Thu Sep 23, 2010 12:20 am

I have excellent results collecting in the Fall, Zone 7, Central Virginia, USA. I collect after a good soaking rain and then try to get as much root as possible. Usually this means a decent sized root ball. I then put this collected material in the ground; Idon't have a green house, cold or otherwise so I use "good old Mother Earth" to keep the trees safe. Then I lift it in Spring to see what I really have. I usually put it into a growing container, after cleaning off the old soil. This has worked well for deciduous material and Broadleaf evergreens. I do not have much experience collecting pines.
Salut, Todd


Last edited by Todd Ellis on Thu Sep 23, 2010 12:22 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : grammar)

Todd Ellis
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: FALL collection of Yamadori

Post  Guest on Thu Sep 23, 2010 3:11 am

Ingvar Nilsson wrote:I've been thinking about timing for fall collecting and repotting. In spring, the tree shows evidence when it's the right time to collect but how about autumn? How can you tell when it's time?

Hello Ingvar. A lot of people in Europe, collect trees at the end of August, through September. Most if not all trees have stopped growing by this time and the way to tell is that the end of the shoots have become woody (in deciduous trees) or the candles have opened and needles have reached their full length and are harder to pull out ( coniferous trees ). Although the top growth has stopped, root growth will carry on in temperatures above 9 derees centigrade. So by collecting at this time, new roots can start to grow before the onset of Winter.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: FALL collection of Yamadori

Post  gman on Thu Sep 23, 2010 5:02 pm

Gax, being in the SW you should be able to collect in the fall but others that live under those conditions will hopefully chime in.

Like Will said in the more northern "climes" we have a fall root growth period - generally from late August to November and just a little clarification .....and that is - that we (forest industry researchers) have found that roots are active above "soil" temperatures of 4 degrees C. The soil temperatures falls a lot slower than ambient air temperatures.
Good luck and keep us posted on your efforts.
Cheers G

gman
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: FALL collection of Yamadori

Post  Ingvar Nilsson on Thu Sep 23, 2010 8:36 pm

will baddeley wrote:
Ingvar Nilsson wrote:I've been thinking about timing for fall collecting and repotting. In spring, the tree shows evidence when it's the right time to collect but how about autumn? How can you tell when it's time?

Hello Ingvar. A lot of people in Europe, collect trees at the end of August, through September. Most if not all trees have stopped growing by this time and the way to tell is that the end of the shoots have become woody (in deciduous trees) or the candles have opened and needles have reached their full length and are harder to pull out ( coniferous trees ). Although the top growth has stopped, root growth will carry on in temperatures above 9 derees centigrade. So by collecting at this time, new roots can start to grow before the onset of Winter.

Great info Will! I've heard all this before, unfortunately not at the same time... Finally it all makes sence! Would cutting back top growth at this time (Aug - Sept) make the roots weaker during winter? Or have they already made use of the green for the season?

Ingvar Nilsson
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: FALL collection of Yamadori

Post  Guest on Thu Sep 23, 2010 8:46 pm

Hello Ingvar. Some reduction on unwanted foliage will ease the pressure on the damaged and weaker root system. It therefore pays to have some idea of what style you want from the tree when its collected.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: FALL collection of Yamadori

Post  NeilDellinger on Fri Sep 24, 2010 11:39 am

An old nurseryman I met once told me "you can dig a tree during any month with an R" This is a pretty broad time reference and there are other things to consider...but his advice excludes the months May through August....generally recognized as bad times to collect a tree.

2 years ago I dug hornbeams in mid very late fall and they thrived the following growing season.

NeilDellinger
Member


Back to top Go down

Thanks

Post  gax on Fri Dec 17, 2010 12:33 am

Thank you all for the replies!

I had found a nicely established Mugo at a local business that was going to be removed. It had great shape. I expressed interest in the tree and he said he'd let me have it for free if I showed up on Wednesday to get it, when they were pulling it up. But on Wednesday when I went back two days later, it had been out of the ground for.. almost two days. They needed it out sooner I guess.

However, I just noticed a decorative Plum in town. It's at least ten years old but was hit by a truck probably two years back. Since then it's recovered nicely, with great shoots coming out and one of the original branches has a fantastic taper. So after contacting the owner he said that he would be happy if I could take it. He was looking to have it ripped out and tossed/ chopped. The only concern for me is him being patient for the seasons to change. Do I dare remove it? The base is probably 8'' were two large trunks about 4-5 inches thick originate. It has beautiful shape. A dead portion of the trunk would make great deadwood.

I worry about extracting it now although it's been an extremely warm winter. No snow yet. Mostly 60s. I am concerned about whether he will actually be patient. Also, I've never collected a tree this size. I have a lot of Pumice, for potting so that should be fine. I assume i should dig three feet down to get enough of the root ball. Maybe 2-3 feet around?

Does anyone have any suggestions?

gax
Member


Back to top Go down

Thanks

Post  Guest on Fri Dec 17, 2010 2:18 am

Hello again. If your worried the present owner won't have the patience to wait for you to dig it up, then dig it up now. Just make sure to give the newly potted tree some protection frow freezing wind or excessive wet conditions. Lets face it, Spring isn't that far off now and I have collected successfully at this time of year. Good luck. Very Happy

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Page 1 of 2 1, 2  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum