Ficus Base Question

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Re: Ficus Base Question

Post  Just Mike on Thu Jan 03, 2013 1:57 am

Ryan wrote:
Just Mike wrote:

i would think it depends on how big and deep you make the wound...im not sure if just scraping the cambium is enough for the tree to want to form the kind of callous you need in order to induce rooting...the drilling allows you to basically pinpoint exactly where you want roots to grow...

are you afraid of the drill? be honest...lol...the drill actually would leave a smaller wound than scraping to expose cambium...


Laughing Laughing I'm not so much afraid of the drill as I am the results of it. I just fear that I wouldn't be able to keep the soil moist enough to encourage root production.

i posted and then saw this...so, even if the soil dryed out and no roots form, the scar is the same as if you would have romoved a branch of the same size as the hole...then you can just re-drill it...


to address the drying out problem...get some fir bark (orchid bark)...1/8" if you can find it...if not 1/4" will work...mix in some sphagnum moss if you want, but i doubt you need too...and put an inch or 2 layer on top, or better yet, cut the bottom off and split a nursery pot and put that around the tree and fill with bark...if it looks like the bark is drying out before the tree needs to be watered just use a spray bottle and spritz the bark to moisten it again.

Just Mike
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Re: Ficus Base Question

Post  Ryan on Thu Jan 10, 2013 8:36 pm

Just Mike wrote:

i posted and then saw this...so, even if the soil dryed out and no roots form, the scar is the same as if you would have romoved a branch of the same size as the hole...then you can just re-drill it...

to address the drying out problem...get some fir bark (orchid bark)...1/8" if you can find it...if not 1/4" will work...mix in some sphagnum moss if you want, but i doubt you need too...and put an inch or 2 layer on top, or better yet, cut the bottom off and split a nursery pot and put that around the tree and fill with bark...if it looks like the bark is drying out before the tree needs to be watered just use a spray bottle and spritz the bark to moisten it again.


Thanks Mike, I like the bark idea and may just do that.

Here's some updated shots. It is really growing like a weed, and has even popped a few aerials, though I'm not sure I want to keep them.






Ryan
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Re: Ficus Base Question

Post  Just Mike on Thu Jan 10, 2013 9:49 pm

ive never personally done this (but i dont see any reason why it cant be done with basically 100% success)...why not thread graft the ariel roots to points further up on the long roots so you can start getting that base figured out rather than just cutting them off? i mean, they are already there and with another inch or 2 of growth they could be grafted...just an idea.

the tree is growing well...are you planning on moving it outside in spring?

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Re: Ficus Base Question

Post  Ryan on Sun Jul 21, 2013 12:43 am

Thinking about doing something to the base of this tree in the next day or so. If I were to, quite literally, cut the roots in half, wouldn't that make them sort of one sided? As in, wouldn't they be round on one side, but flat on the other?

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Re: Ficus Base Question

Post  Ryan on Sun Jul 21, 2013 3:12 am

Could I thread graft some new seedlings through the thick roots?

http://www.bonsai4me.com/AdvTech/ATthreadgraftingroots.htm

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Re: Ficus Base Question

Post  Ryan on Mon Jul 22, 2013 4:16 am

Regardless of the game plan for this guy, I went ahead and did a repot today. It's grown a pretty fair amount since last repot:



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Re: Ficus Base Question

Post  Ryan on Sat Sep 14, 2013 4:45 am

Just Mike wrote:ficus grow roots like crazy, and can have petty drastic things done to their roots...with that said, you could drill little holes where you want new roots to grow, fill them with rooting hormone, then either pot the tree deeper so that the areas are covered and remain slightly moist, or cover the area with sphagnum moss...you should have new roots emerging from those areas in a few months depending on growing conditions and all that good stuff...

This is something I am reconsidering after doing something similar to another Ficus. What I'm wondering is, should I go all the way through the root (to the other side), or do I just drill halfway into the root? Or does it even matter?

Ryan
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Re: Ficus Base Question

Post  Ryan on Sat Sep 14, 2013 4:46 am

Just Mike wrote:not very big at all (like 1/8" give or take)...and not very deep either...deep enough to go through the cambium but you dont have to drill all the way through or anything...basically, what you are doing is the same thing that is done when airlayering or rooting a cutting...you are creating a wound that the tree will want to heal over...the rooting hormoe makes it so that the cells created in the healing process are root cells capable of sending out new roots...which reminds me, if you drill small holes, a ficus grows and heals so quickly that it will most likely just heal over the wound and not feel the need to send out new roots, so you need to place something in the hole to prevent it from completely healing over...like a toothpick, or part of a skewer or something...im not the one who thought of this method and im certainly not the first to have used it, so ill try to find an article or 2 on the technique so you have a reference...i will say this though, its pretty reliable on species that root easily, and its pretty handy given that you can choose where you would like new roots to grow...



Woops, just saw this. That answers that question...

Ryan
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Re: Ficus Base Question

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