ficus carica

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ficus carica

Post  memet on Sat May 19, 2012 9:03 pm

my lovely and strange ficus carica.
Has too much branches and roots.
I'm pruning day by day.
Ä°t has 15 cm weight and just 5 centimetre high trunk. Must be more than ten years old.

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Ficus carica

Post  bonsaisr on Sat May 19, 2012 9:35 pm

Does yours ever produce fruit? Tried it once.
Iris

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Re: ficus carica

Post  memet on Sat May 19, 2012 9:46 pm

I bought this last year. I did not produce. I have to stop pruning to see the fruit.

we are making jam, with green male ficus fruits. Very tasty

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Re: ficus carica

Post  Sakaki on Sat May 19, 2012 10:07 pm

What style do you intend for this?
It is now something like forest + raft style Laughing

Taner

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Re: ficus carica

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Sat May 19, 2012 11:41 pm

We are making jam, with green male Ficus fruits. Very tasty

Ficus flowers are inside the fruit, and are complete; there is no such thing as male/female on different plants. If fruit doesn't mature it isn't being pollinated. Some varieties of F. carica are self fertile others require a specific species of wasp to pollinate them. Ficus/Figs have been grown in your part of the world for thousands of years. My ancestors came to Florida, from the Balearic Islands, probably in the 1760's to grow figs. We always have figs at my place, but the variety I have is self-fertile and I get ripe fruit, if the birds and raccoons don't get them first.

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Re: ficus carica

Post  memet on Sun May 20, 2012 8:21 pm

First of all, thank you very much for trying to teach something about this sp. to whom already living in the homeland of this fig.

There are millions of fig trees growing naturally here. I will try to take some photos for you soon; those that are growing naturally, and those that are cultivated for agriculturally. They are strong trees that one of them is growing near my garden wall.

Of course there are male and female of this tree, and also there are fig flies specific to this sp. These flies ensure pollination between two trees. Since the people who brought these figs to America continent in ancient times did not bring these flies also, those figs in America could not produce fruits.

In the city of Aydin (in Turkiye), harvest rate was considerably reduced as the flies have died due to use of incorrect insecticides.

The one that produce fruits is female figs. These flies enter into fruits of these female figs.

Fruits of male trees appear earlier, but they do not ripen, stays green, and cannot be eaten. Then we use them for jam which is delicious and has a nice aroma.

Don’t believe? Come and see our fig forests in Turkiye… Just kidding! I meant forest-like huge agricultural production fields here…

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Re: ficus carica

Post  memet on Sat May 26, 2012 7:10 pm

One more carica.
I think it's around six year old.
I found it last year,together in a Pittosporum pot.
Ä°n everywhere you can found one carica .


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Re: ficus carica

Post  memet on Sun Sep 30, 2012 4:32 pm



One more ficus

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Re: ficus carica

Post  Jerry Meislik on Mon Oct 01, 2012 1:17 am

Memet,
You have some very nice Figs to work with.
Keep us posted on how they develop.
Jerry

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Re: ficus carica

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Mon Oct 01, 2012 2:10 am

Monoecious (meaning "one house" in Greek) plants have separate male and female flowers on the same plant. These plants are often wind pollinated. Examples of monoecious plants include corn (Zea mays),[10] birch and pine trees,[11] and most fig species.[12]

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Re: ficus carica

Post  memet on Mon Oct 01, 2012 7:58 am

Billy, billy billy.

I really ready to help your problems.

But.
Tell me what?

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Re: ficus carica

Post  memet on Tue Oct 02, 2012 4:45 pm

My dear Billy, ı worked hard for your carica trouble. I found some words, and one link. I hope its will help you about carica.

I'm sending best regards to you, form the land of carica.
Then, ı may send you some dried carica.Thats best.


"Ficus carica is a shrub type plant of which homeland is East Mediterranean and west Asia (expanding from Turkey to Afghanistan).
It is the only one that is commercially grown for its fruits among other 800 ficus species. It is divided into two category; female trees and male trees. Male and female organs do not exist on same tree. Female trees have bigger and much more fruits compared to male ones which have smaller and fewer fruits. Fruits of male trees are not so delicious; its basic mission is to pollinate female trees. Usually, just one male tree is planted near other female trees. Pollination (called “Caprification”) is ensured by gallflies.

They reach 8-10 m height - usually grows in rocky/stony and arid fields. Their flowers have a single case. Pollens of male flowers cannot reach female flowers without aid of a fly called “Blastophaga psenes”. This fly enters the green fruit, inserts its string into pistil in order to lay its eggs; so, it ensures pollination at the same time.

This fly (Blastophaga psenes) lives natively in Turkey. In ancient times, Americans brought this fly to California to yield ficus carica fruits, but they were underachiever."


close up last words

And one link. I think American journal of botany will help you.
I'm still here to help any problems of you.

http://www.amjbot.org/content/88/12/2214.full




Best wishes form the Aegean sea.




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Re: ficus carica

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Tue Oct 02, 2012 5:51 pm

Interesting, I have one Fig tree in my yard and it bears fruit every year, without another tree nearby or even wasps. This tree is self-fertile.
My ancestors were brought to Florida from the Western Mediterranean in the 1700's to grow figs in Florida. We have always had a fig tree in our yard it is part of our family heritage.
I was really not aware that some figs were male and female on different trees.

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Re: ficus carica

Post  coh on Tue Oct 02, 2012 6:18 pm

Billy M. Rhodes wrote:Interesting, I have one Fig tree in my yard and it bears fruit every year, without another tree nearby or even wasps. This tree is self-fertile.

I've grown figs in the ground in Virginia and in pots here in upstate NY, and never had a problem getting them to fruit. But I'm pretty sure the common varieties that we grow do not produce viable seed unless they are pollinated. So...they're not really "self-fertile", even though they produce edible figs.

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Re: ficus carica

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Tue Oct 02, 2012 7:48 pm

Good point

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