Chinese Elm re-grow...

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Chinese Elm re-grow...

Post  Todd Ellis on Sun Feb 19, 2012 4:09 pm

About two years ago I posted this Chinese Elm that I just pruned. The tree was approx 30-40 years old from Brussels. I had exposed it to 8 weeks of Winter cold and then grew it indoors. The tree thrived. Then last Winter, I decided to over Winter it outdoors (protected and insulated) for the entire season; this was a mistake for an older tree. Most of the top died and I was very glad to see that the roots survived plus some of the original trunk. This past year I let it grow out and wired it in the Fall of 2011. I let it stay outdoors for 6 weeks of Winter and brought it indoors in January 2012. The new branches are growing fast and thickening. I actually like the shorter tree with more exposed roots. I am deciding on a top and am leaving options open while it continues to grow. I will need to carve the stump but left it until the new growth became vigorous. Any suggestions are welcome.
Please forgive the blurred pics.
Best,
Todd
Before Winter die back, length approx 28-30 inches, height 26 inches (tree top to end of cascade trunk):


Today after pruning, height 11.5 inches (top of tree to bottom of pot):


Other side:





Last edited by Todd Ellis on Sun Feb 19, 2012 4:20 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : changed inches info)

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Re: Chinese Elm re-grow...

Post  Todd Ellis on Sun Feb 19, 2012 5:21 pm

Another photo of this elm in my indoor setup under fluorescents. This is our garden tub and I have two 4 foot long fixtures; we don't bath in it because it takes too long to fill up. There is enough light to let the plants stay alive, until warmer weather when they go outside. The spiderwart below is really struggling...

The elm:


The garden tub:


Thanks,
Todd

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Re: Chinese Elm re-grow...

Post  Pavel Slovák on Sun Feb 19, 2012 5:41 pm

Hi Todd
I think in the future will be very interesting, original tree. Tribe has great potential and in the spring the tree will grow very strongly. I love this cascade. Good luck with the new composition. ThumbsUp
Gretings Pavel

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Re: Chinese Elm re-grow...

Post  drgonzo on Sun Feb 19, 2012 6:00 pm

Now this is a guy who's not afraid to grow some plants! Sometimes I look at my various jungle windows and think I must be crazy. Now I can rest easier knowing Todd is right there with me.

I tried growing chinese elm in the ground last year and lost about 1/3 of the top to winter as well. Now its in a big pot. I think your cascade will be better served in the long run as the compacted foliage really beefs up the trunk visually!

Excellent use and placement of the rubber ducky in the display.
-Jay

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Re: Chinese Elm re-grow...

Post  Todd Ellis on Sun Feb 19, 2012 11:44 pm

Thank you Pavel. I have been inspired by your work
And Jay ... I am crazy too ... crazy in love with the Green Things! Very Happy

Best,
Todd

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Re: Chinese Elm re-grow...

Post  Andre Beaurain on Mon Feb 20, 2012 6:50 am

Dear Todd

also love the rubber duck!!
feel sorry for your Crassula arborescens under the table, if anything needs light and heat (well I know you cant do the heat) , that would be it! Your Cyclamen is looking stunning!

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Re: Chinese Elm re-grow...

Post  marcus watts on Mon Feb 20, 2012 6:58 am

nah...the rubber duck is too obvious....................it is Yoda that made me smile ! especially now Jay has turned to the dark side.

Good luck with the elm, it will grow very fast if you let it.

cheers Marcus

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Re: Chinese Elm re-grow...

Post  Todd Ellis on Mon Feb 20, 2012 1:24 pm

Not try ... DO! What a Face
I'm glad you saw Yoda, he's da man!
Very Happy

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Re: Chinese Elm re-grow...

Post  Jesse on Tue Feb 21, 2012 2:44 pm

drgonzo wrote:I tried growing chinese elm in the ground last year and lost about 1/3 of the top to winter as well.

Hmmm, I have 4 elms (I believe chinese) that I intended to plant in the ground this spring that are wintering in my garage atm. I was under the impression they are winter hardy? Given the reports here, is it a bad idea to try and trunk fatten in the ground in a place like Utah? -Jesse

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Re: Chinese Elm re-grow...

Post  Todd Ellis on Thu Feb 23, 2012 3:53 am

Hi Jesse,
It depends on the elm. My understanding of Ulmus parvifolia is that some are subtropical, while others are temperate - genetically speaking... (I realize I'm going out on a limb here...) Perhaps some of our botanists or other horticulturalists can add there knowledge here. I have some Chinese elms that winter outside all year round in pots and are hardy in my zone 7a location. This tree is a Chinese import and probably comes from a gene pool from a warmer region. For instance, I cannot successfully raise Taxodium d. (Bald Cypresses), in containers, collected from LA,MS, AL, etc because our winters are too cold here in VA; they have to have protection. However, cypresses grown in colder regions of the country do fine here.
Best,
Todd

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Re: Chinese Elm re-grow...

Post  drgonzo on Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:07 am

Jesse

I'm at 1250 feet above sea level on the lee side of a mountain in zone 5b. So your experience with planting out chinese Elm will hopefully be better then mine. The winter winds up here toasted the canopy. Just wasn't meant to be.
-Jay

ETA...Oh.. THERE'S Yoda! Now I see him.

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Re: Chinese Elm re-grow...

Post  drgonzo on Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:12 am

Todd Ellis wrote:Hi Jesse,
It depends on the elm. My understanding of Ulmus parvifolia is that some are subtropical, while others are temperate - genetically speaking... (I realize I'm going out on a limb here...)

I dont believe it's genetic as much as it's cultural. When allowed to drop its leaves U. Parvifolia are temperate, when kept in leaf they are semi-tropical. I believe the correct term is Half-hardy, but Iris will know.
-Jay

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Re: Chinese Elm re-grow...

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