Yuhua Stone (Rain Flower Stone)

Page 4 of 4 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Thanks!

Post  jhankri on Mon Apr 30, 2012 4:56 pm

Hello Chris,
Thank you very much for your valued information on the Mandarin term for "stone seats". Attended several of the events during Asia Week in NYC in March, but unfortunately did not learn of Kemin Hu's personal appearances at the Asia Society Museum until it was too late to change plans to include them. However, I did visit the Asia Society gift shop to admire the many examples of gongshi that she had consigned for sale there. They were truly impressive. One could clearly see the results of the trained "eye" that had selected them. I understand that her father was also a reknowned scholar and collector of Chinese art. Perhaps next year, if she returns.

The stones I am having shizuo carved for were both found in the US. One is a neprite jade cobble from the beaches of Big Sur in California. The other is a small grey granite pebble that I picked up in the stream that runs behind the Sanctuario in Chimayo, NM. It looks just like a tiny rounded hillock, and is the only stone I have found myself that I believed of nice enough quality to have mounted. Will post images when they are finished. (I requested that they be carved in traditional Chinese style, of rosewood)

This summer when time permits, I plan to look for interesting stones on the banks of the Ohio River, near my home. The alluvial gravels one finds were probably pushed southward by glaciers in the distant past. (?) They include some colorful and interesting granite pebbles and cherts. In the past even a daimond of good size was found on the Ohio. Its a real mixture, but unfortunately no agates.

Again Chris, many thanks for sharing, and for the warm welcome.

jhankri
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Yuhua Stone (Rain Flower Stone)

Post  Chris Cochrane on Mon Apr 30, 2012 9:15 pm

Hi jhankri... It is a pleasure to find you interested in scholars rocks and in collecting & mounting American stones in Chinese gongshi style. There are few known professional carvers of shizuo in the USA. I'd love to hear of those craftsmen with interest & skill. You might be aware of Tom Elias initiating a group of North American enthusiasts collecting stones in Chinese style. "Stonener" (a.k.a. Joseph) on IBC attends meeting for Tom's group. Organizers of Potomac Viewing Stone Group (PVSG), which meets at the U.S. National Arboretum (Washington DC), have included regional stones of traditional Chinese style in Museum exhibitions since 1997. Perhaps, there is a club in mid-America which collects and venerates stones in classic Chinese style. Collectors of artistic Chinese scholars rocks are many-- often more associated with collections of Chinese scholar art or modern art than with bonsai/penjing collections.

Kemin Hu has recently been to the scholar' rock/painting/object exhibition at the Guimet Museum in Paris: Rochers de lettrés, itinéraires de l'art en Chine. It must be stunning; she says the catalog doesn't do it justice. Kemin also is scheduled to speak twice at the International Stone Appreciation Symposium (ISAS) in Grantsville PA in October 2012; a website announcing symposium programs is approaching completion at StoneShow2012.com.

Re' Chinese scholars' rocks/gongshi, Anna Rosenblum Palmer will be exhibiting stones and speaking on the building of her father's collection at the October ISAS. Fifteen years ago, the world tour of Richard Rosenblum's collection of scholars' rocks (exhibition titled _Worlds Within Worlds_) brought international attention to this art. The exhibition book is often quoted for its scholarly text. This will be a an extraordinary opportunity to reconnect with the Rosenblum Collection.

The opportunity to meet other enthusiasts from throughout the USA & internationally will be exceptional.

_________________
... visit the U.S. National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, Washington DC USA-- http://www.bonsai-nbf.com

Chris Cochrane
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Yuhua Stone (Rain Flower Stone)

Post  jhankri on Wed May 02, 2012 9:36 pm

Hello Chris,

Thanks again for the information. Was aware of the PVSG, it is interesting that American stones are being used in such a context. Along with the popularity of collecting in the US in general, there seems to be a resurgence of interest in collecting natural objects, including of course stones. I became interested in gongshi myself after reading a quote from one of the old Ming manuals on good taste that a studio without at least one good example lacked elegance!

As another example of the current interest in natural untouched stones, I am amazed by the intense interest in and enormous prices being brought by, uncut, natural jade pebbles from the classic findsite in the Yurungkash River in China. (near Hetian (Khotan) in Xinjiang Province) I have read that in China, fine quality, uncut white nephrite jade pebbles (lao yu, or "old jade") are reportedly bringing 45 to 60 dollars US per gram! Prices are especially high if the natural shape comforms to recognized icons of good fortune, wealth, or longevity in Chinese symbolism. For example a peach, or sycee (a traditional ingot of precious metal). Needless to say, such precious natural treasures would never be cut.

Would like to attend the ISAS, and will look into my schedule and see if I can make it. It would be great fun meeting other stone enthusiasts, and seeing the stones. Would also be a great opportunity to begin to develop an "eye" for traditional stone appreciation. Also, would very much like to visit your museum when I'm in DC.

jhankri
Member


Back to top Go down

sorry so late

Post  stonener on Thu May 03, 2012 11:14 am

Thanks Sunip! glad you like it!
this kind of agate very hard to find, not many
Dragon you say, I do not see the dragon?
this type tall and narrow extremely hard to make daiza for me.
I use a small incense burner filled with sand to display,
as women rising from within a blooming flower... Basketball


Last edited by stonener on Thu May 03, 2012 11:17 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : to many notes)

stonener
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Yuhua Stone (Rain Flower Stone)

Post  sunip on Thu May 03, 2012 12:20 pm

stonener wrote:
Dragon you say, I do not see the dragon?
this type tall and narrow extremely hard to make daiza for me.
as women rising from within a blooming flower... Basketball
Hello Stonener,
Dragon means a certain energy, not necessary a head tail and claws thing.
The mythical animal in all his possible shapes, is a symbol of something that is hard to envision.
The Chinese have always been very aware of this energy and found many ways to express it and use it.
I love your vision of the rising women out of a flower, it is both Yn and Yang.
Sunip Wink

sunip
Member


Back to top Go down

Sorry for getting off topic

Post  jhankri on Sat May 12, 2012 10:13 pm

Hello Stonener, Sunip, and Wen,

First of all, let me apologize for getting off topic in this section of the forum on yuhuashi. Am very new to participating in online forums and may not have the hang of it yet, but will learn. Smile

Stonener, that is a fantastic agate you found! May I ask where you found it?

And Sunip, I really loved your description of the piece as a "dragon pillar". I have a tiny collection of yuhuashi from China, and am extremely interested in the traditional Chinese terms for describing these wonderful natural gems.

Wen, with the fantastic collection of yuhuashi you have formed, would appreciate any tips you could pass along about the traditional way of evaluating such stones.

Thanks everyone!

jhankri
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Yuhua Stone (Rain Flower Stone)

Post  Sponsored content Today at 1:46 pm


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 4 of 4 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum