Martin Pauli writes on Yoseki - Caring for Stones

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Martin Pauli writes on Yoseki - Caring for Stones

Post  Kev Bailey on Tue Jan 10, 2012 11:26 am

Martin graciously contacted me to say;

Hi there,

Once a while I am stopping by the suiseki forum and look up the posts.
I noticed one post "shortcuts to stone treatment, not for everyone", and it seems that for many on the forum it's not clear which way to treat stones is the right way.
I tried to register but it didn't work out. Maybe I can help with some information. It would be great if you could publish it - of course if you want to.

In general, every culture is having different opinion or roles about stones and stone treatment.
In China stones are altered, cut, brushed polished, oiled, waxed and that's normal.
By the way in China they are very upset if somebody calls a Chinese stone suiseki. Suiseki is a very Japanese art concept.

However, in Japan treatment of stones is called Yôseki.
The word Yô is also used in the term for bringing up children. So Yôseki means to "care" about stones.

There are two concepts of Yôseki, one the garden-Yôseki and the other the in-house-Yôseki

Stones kept in the garden are mainly landscape stones but also Hut stones (Kuzuya), suitable for Suiban display, of medium hard matrial found in rivers or found in the ocean which are called Kobi ishi.
Stones just found in water are new stones called "ara ishi".

The suface of these stones are created in water and these stones have never been exposed to sun light or air before somebody has taken them out of the water.
Stones found in the water have either soft surfaces, ground and polished by the forces of the river or very rough surfaces, created by the ground water. These Stones have not been shaped by the forces of the river.

At first, it takes a few years until such a new stone is completely dry. Until a stone is completely dry, it refuses to keep water but once it is dry (3 to 5 years) it will takes up the water like a sponge. This effect is called Mizumôchi.

Hard stones like Kamuikotan, Sado Akadama, Setagawa, Abura ishi cannot become "mizumôchi no Ii ishi". In Japan the best stones that are "mizumôchi no Ii" are Saji, Kamo, Yase, Ibi, Abe, Kibune, Kurama ishi.

For Yôseki the stones are laid on wooden blanks in the garden and first of all exposed to the sun light which is the most important aspect of Yôseki and secondly watered with rain water once a while and the rain itself does its own.

Over the years, the processes of watering, evaporation, and light will create a sort of erosion of the surface. Erosion literally means, the surface becomes fine pored and absorbs more light, the stone seams to become darker. In Japan they expose the bottom of the stone to the sun light one day per months. In 10 to 20 years one can see how well the yôseki has changed the stone's surface.

After 20 years most of the stones have become suiseki, a daiza is made for it and the surface will not become better. The suiseki is then kept in the hose, in a box to prevent the surface to become dirty and dusty and its ready to be used for suiseki kazari.

Hard stones and those traditionally not displayed in Suiban are kept in the house and once a while rubbed with a soft clean cotton cloth.
This form of Yôseki also takes years to create a perfect surface with a deep gloss. In the west collectors prefer to speed up things and use polishing tools but a Japanese connoisseur will immediately see that its been polished by tools because the speed of the wheels only polish off the surface and does reach the pores in depth.
Stones kept in house are hard stones representing landscapes like the hard stones listed above and stones representing persons like Kannon ishi, animals, boats and pattern stones and Biseki such as Akadam ishi and Kikka seki.

Dich Benbow's stone I assume is to hard for garden Yoseki.

Yvonne's first stone is ideal for garden Yôseki, the second one is far too hard as well.

Best regards,

Martin Pauli

_________________
“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” - Charles Darwin.

Kev Bailey
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Re: Martin Pauli writes on Yoseki - Caring for Stones

Post  vlado on Tue Jan 10, 2012 3:32 pm

Thank you very much. Simple, interesting and instructive.

Have a nice day.
vlado

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Re: Martin Pauli writes on Yoseki - Caring for Stones

Post  dick benbow on Tue Jan 10, 2012 3:54 pm

Martin, I can't tell you how appreciative I am for your sharing . Thank-you, very helpful!

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Re: Martin Pauli writes on Yoseki - Caring for Stones

Post  Chris Cochrane on Tue Jan 10, 2012 5:19 pm

Thanks for forwarding Martin's comments, Kev. Thanks, Martin!!!

Previously, Martin forwarded an invitation to read his eBook titled, Suiseki & the Unique View of Nature in Japan. It is the 6th publication from the bottom listed on Martin's business website Angular Momentum [linked HERE]. At the time he shared his eBook, I noted (and continue to believe)...
... In the sharing of Martin Pauli,we find the deepest respect & appreciation for suiseki and Japanese-style suiseki practice.

Martin Pauli is the clearest source for information on Japanese suiseki practice & his several publications sparkle. Corresponding with him is a joy. Martin separates his knowledge based on extraordinary experience as Matsuura's first serious Western student & as a client in high-end Japanese suiseki circles. He has seen stones as well as publications that are typically reserved for a few intimate suiseki associates and participated in discussions at levels seldom plumbed by enthusiasts. He isn't limited by polite expression to gloss over important details if his listener doesn't pick-up on subtle details, and it distinguishes his guidance. When Martin is not sure of a detail, he will clarify and challenge the need for discovery.

Martin begins with appreciation of feeling for nature & finds its expression in the subtle display of stones in Japanese suiseki style. Descriptions on Martin's blog (LINKED HERE) of the stones illustrated in the new publication are extraordinarily insightful.

_________________
... visit the U.S. National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, Washington DC USA-- http://www.bonsai-nbf.com

Chris Cochrane
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Re: Martin Pauli writes on Yoseki - Caring for Stones

Post  suisekipr on Tue Jan 10, 2012 9:07 pm

Like this



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Re: Martin Pauli writes on Yoseki - Caring for Stones

Post  Guest on Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:03 am

Hi Martin

I am very happy to read your words. I will go back and read them more than one time.
I am sitting in Tokyo now, in the morning, ready to go to work.
But yeasterday was I in Kyoto, and have spend a coupple of days searcing for stones in the Kamogawa...when I am back home in Denmark will I show 7 or 8 nice stones I found.
I really hope you will talk again on IBC, as we need someone who can teach us more.
You mention two of my stones, at the moment can I not remember them, but I am sure, it will come back to me.

Kind regards Yvonne Smile

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Re: Martin Pauli writes on Yoseki - Caring for Stones

Post  sunip on Wed Jan 11, 2012 9:35 pm

Hello Suisekipr,
Is this your garden? Very Happy
Hello Martin,
Thank you.
I enjoyed reading your site with all these thoughts you gathered and those lovely stones.
Good to mention the different approach to life, different eyes see different things.
Next time i am passing the Aare fluss i hope for some time to look fore stones who want to be found,
it is a long river.
Sunip Wink

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food for the starving

Post  stonener on Thu Jan 12, 2012 8:57 am

Martin Pauli your words are filling, Doumo Arigato


Last edited by stonener on Thu Jan 12, 2012 9:03 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : add pix)

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Re: Martin Pauli writes on Yoseki - Caring for Stones

Post  Guest on Mon Feb 20, 2012 3:44 pm

Hi Kev Bailey

It was very nice to meet you at Noelanders Trophy ....you are not easy to recognise without the cliff Smile.
A pity we did not have the time to talk, as many people came to the table at the same time. I hope to see you again next year.

I have a question to Martin Pauli.Can you forward it to him?.

I have been reading hes very nice homepage. And I have a question.

Softer stones suitable for outdoor yoseki is displayed in suibans. Are they also displayed in daizas all year?.

And after the surface has finished outdoor, are they then being treated with indoor yoseki, if the surface allows?

Kind regards Yvonne

,

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Re: Martin Pauli writes on Yoseki - Caring for Stones

Post  Kev Bailey on Mon Feb 20, 2012 5:05 pm

Hi Yvonne, that was not me at Noelanders. I didn't get there. Perhaps you met Tony Tickle?

_________________
“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” - Charles Darwin.

Kev Bailey
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Re: Martin Pauli writes on Yoseki - Caring for Stones

Post  Guest on Mon Feb 20, 2012 5:20 pm

Embarassed Embarassed Embarassed

Was it Bob Embarassed ???

Anyway...Please pass my questions on, Many thanks. I really hope for an answer.

Kind regards Yvonne

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Re: Martin Pauli writes on Yoseki - Caring for Stones

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