Willow Leaf Ficus Nomenclature

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Re: Willow Leaf Ficus Nomenclature

Post  Rob Kempinski on Wed Jan 11, 2012 2:08 pm

bonsaisr wrote:I questioned Prof. Berg about the theory that F. salicaria is a rheophyte back home. He explained the assumption is due to its shrubby rather than treelike habit, and the shape of the leaves. You'll notice that F. salicaria leaves are much thinner and narrower than any of the other tropical figs. This is a known hallmark of rheophytes. Notice how the species resembles the osier willows that grow on the banks of rivers, where they are sometimes flooded at high water. Willow leaf indeed.
There are many plants that are found in unique situations in the wild, but adapt happily to life in a pot, like orchids & other epiphytes. As I said, until the tree is found in the wild, it is just an educated guess & we can go right on growing it in pots.
Iris

Willow Leaf Ficus can attain tree like proportion if left in the wild. It will definitely get root rot if submerged continuously in water.
This rheophyte argument is weak.

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Willow Leaf Ficus Nomenclature

Post  bonsaisr on Wed Feb 15, 2012 5:40 pm

Well, suppose there was a bird that had never been seen in the wild, but had been popular in zoos and circuses for 50 years. It does fine in a birdcage like other birds. But an ornithologist examines one and notices it has webbed feet. So he says, "Nobody has seen it in the wild, but the webbed feet indicate this bird lives around water."
Willow shaped leaves are the plant equivalent of webbed feet. You usually can't convict on circumstantial evidence alone. Remember O.J. Simpson. But let's keep an open mind.
Iris

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Re: Willow Leaf Ficus Nomenclature

Post  JIM SMITH on Thu Feb 16, 2012 9:58 pm

i planted a hundred Willow Leaf figs in the ground. a wet area of the nursery. about twenty years ago, they grew to about twenty five feet tall. When I started to dig them I found that all the roots had rotted except the surface roots.
I would likt to know what information Dr. Berg can give us regardin the Ficus celebensis, a tree that Dr David Fairchild brought to the Fairchild Tropical Garden from the Celebes in 1947. Dr Ira Condit in his book "Ficus The Exotic Species" describes it as having willowlike leaves. Dr E, J. H Corner at Cambridge England named it Ficus regularis. Dr Condits Ficus celebensis is number 22 in his book.

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Willow Leaf Ficus Nomenclature

Post  bonsaisr on Fri Feb 17, 2012 12:39 am

JIM SMITH wrote:i planted a hundred Willow Leaf figs in the ground. a wet area of the nursery. about twenty years ago, they grew to about twenty five feet tall. When I started to dig them I found that all the roots had rotted except the surface roots.
Wet ground is not the same as growing in a river. Flowing water brings oxygen to the roots.
I will look up the other species & get back to you.
Iris

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Willow Leaf Ficus Nomenclature

Post  bonsaisr on Fri Feb 17, 2012 12:52 am

Mr. Smith, they are two entirely different species.
From The Plant List, master database:
Ficus regularis Standl. is a synonym of Ficus trigona L.f.
This name is a synonym of Ficus trigona L.f..
The record derives from WCSP (in review) which reports it as a synonym with original publication details: Publ. Field Mus. Nat. Hist., Bot. Ser. 17: 175 1937.
Full publication details for this name can be found in IPNI: urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:104702-2.

Ficus celebensis Corner is an accepted name
This name is the accepted name of a species in the genus Ficus (family Moraceae).
The record derives from WCSP (in review) which reports it as an accepted name with original publication details: Gard. Bull. Singapore 17: 478 1960.
Full publication details for this name can be found in IPNI: urn:lsid:ipni.org:names:583333-1.
Iris

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Willow Leaf Ficus Nomenclature

Post  bonsaisr on Sun Jun 17, 2012 2:52 am

I erred in my explanation of how a cultivar name becomes official. According to the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants, the Torah and ultimate authority on the subject, a cultivar name becomes official when it is published in print. It can be a book, magazine, catalogue, flyer, or guide to an exhibition, as long as it is dated, printed hard copy that is distributed to a significant number of people. If a genus or family has an official Registration Authority, that body usually sees to it that new cultivar names are published. In the genus Ficus, the ongoing stream of new ornamental cultivars is found in trade journals, magazines, catalogues, & other publications. Following the guidance of Rafael Govaerts, the head taxonomist at Kew, I published my article in my own bonsai club newsletter and sent out several printed copies. This constitutes valid publication.
Iris


Last edited by bonsaisr on Mon Oct 08, 2012 8:37 pm; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : Updated information)

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Re: Willow Leaf Ficus Nomenclature

Post  JIM SMITH on Mon Oct 08, 2012 4:10 pm

Iris I need your help. I have tried to access professor Bergs paper on the Ficus salicaria in Britonia Janurary 2004: Vol.56, Issue 1 but have been denied access. Since you have contact with him would you please ask him for a physical description of the Ficus salicaria so that we can compare it with our Willow Leaf Fig. After reading some of the information on this subject my question, is Ficus salicaria the same plant as our Willow Leaf Fig?
Thanks, Jim

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Willow Leaf Ficus Nomenclature

Post  bonsaisr on Mon Oct 08, 2012 8:31 pm

Alas, I can't ask Prof. Berg anything, as he is deceased. I'm pretty sure I once got hold of the article in Brittonia, perhaps the abstract. I will try to track it down. The keepers of FigWeb are very helpful. I would assume the description jibes, since it was based on a typical cultivated specimen, probably from Florida.
Iris

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Willow Leaf Ficus Nomenclature

Post  bonsaisr on Mon Oct 15, 2012 10:18 pm

The New York Botanical Garden was kind enough to send me a scan of the Brittonia article. Please excuse the quality. The original scan came in with two pages upside down, so I printed & rescanned it.
One interesting note. Typically, the botanical drawing of a new species includes a sketch of the whole tree, showing its growth habit. That is missing here. According to the description, F. salicaria is shrubby. I have read accounts that its restrained growth makes it very suitable for landscaping. However, one of our IBC members said it can grow into a big tree. Are both descriptions correct? Outside of that, the description in the article matches our tree.
Iris






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Re: Willow Leaf Ficus Nomenclature

Post  JIM SMITH on Wed Oct 17, 2012 6:49 pm

Since we do not have a picture of the plant he named Ficus salicaria we must follow his text. He said Condit's description of the plants matches neither of the material I received from the nurseries

Cpondit's description as described in his book on page 192 matches my willow leaf figs that iI have been growing for 37 years and is as follows:

4.5 m tall
some aerial roots
silver grey bark
buds .8cm
buds tawny in color
alternate leaves
figs choclate brown spots

Jim

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Re: Willow Leaf Ficus Nomenclature

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