orange jelly

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orange jelly

Post  sunip on Thu Nov 17, 2011 10:56 am

Hello,
I had a problem this season with one of my pre bonsai Prunus Jap. incisa koyo no mai.
Some orange jelly appeared around an old cut, i removed it and some came back again.
There was a bit on a nearby branch to afterwards.
I put the tree aside and did not do anything since.
It is a reaction from the tree on a fungus i belief, i do not remember the name of it.
What to do with it, is it lost?

Sunip

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Re: orange jelly

Post  JimLewis on Thu Nov 17, 2011 1:24 pm

Cedar apple rust -- late stages. Clean it off. Spray with a copper fungicide.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: orange jelly

Post  sunip on Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:20 pm

Thanks Jim,
That must be it.
I will give it a try with copper fungicide.
I have it only 4 years but it bloomed nice each year.
Sunip Wink

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Re: orange jelly

Post  JimLewis on Thu Nov 17, 2011 9:15 pm

I apologize. I misread and thought for some reason that it was a juniper (and didn't even look at the plant that jelly was clinging to . . . which would have told me). Glad you mentioned "blooming."

But for a Prunus species, that jelly mass means there has been physical damage to the tree somehow. If you haven't pruned it somewhere nearby, clean the goop off and look carefully for signs of borers. If you find them, a systemic MAY help.

Again . . . sorry for the misinformation.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: orange jelly

Post  Hans Vleugels on Thu Nov 17, 2011 10:05 pm

Still looks like some kind of rust to me. I would be careful with it...

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Re: orange jelly

Post  drgonzo on Fri Nov 18, 2011 2:25 am

An amber colored jelly on Prunus can actually be cytospora canker, which is a fungal disease that is commonly confused with peach tree borers.

But check for the borers too as Jim said, they are a very common problem that, I have read, can be treated with a product containing Spinosad.
-Jay

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Re: orange jelly

Post  sunip on Fri Nov 18, 2011 2:44 pm

Hello,
Thanks for your reactions.
It looks a bit like the jelly one sees on junipers yes but there is no tumour growth.
There are no holes so i guess it could be cytospora canker then.
Can i use the same copper fungicide Jim mentioned earlier for this, is there any hope?
I keep it at distance from other trees.
I used to have them in the greenhouse over the winter to get early blossom,
but now i leave it outside.
Maybe the overwintering is the reason it has the fungus?
Sunip

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Re: orange jelly

Post  drgonzo on Fri Nov 18, 2011 4:42 pm

Here's some quick info of cytospora,
http://www.colostate.edu/programs/wcrc/pubs/research_outreach/cytosporacanker.pdf

Unfortunately there is not much to be done once the infection is present, and its a good bet it may have entered through bark cracks from being left out all winter, or also pruning wounds which is the most common way it gets established.

Treat all wounds, maintain vigor of the tree, prune out any dead or diseased branches, don't leave stubs. Try to keep major pruning to early spring and not when rain is imminent. Treat pruning cuts larger than one inch in diameter with a paint of 1%
thiram or 3-10% Copper Naphthenate.

Its mostly all about prevention, and protection of any wounds you, or the tree itself may create.
-Jay

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Re: orange jelly

Post  sunip on Fri Nov 18, 2011 7:59 pm

Thanks Jay,
A helpful link.
I planned to cut down an other and bigger one to shohin size in the future,
but this will be a tricky undertaking.
The wound should be extremely clean and covered for many years till, it will be grown over.
Sunip, Wink

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Re: orange jelly

Post  JimLewis on Fri Nov 18, 2011 8:36 pm

Don't get too hopeful. These kinds of things are very, very hard to cure. Be sure you have segregated the plant away from all other plums, cherries, peaches, apples, and pears or better yet, ANY member of the rose family.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: orange jelly

Post  sunip on Fri Nov 18, 2011 8:48 pm

Hello Jim.
I my last post i was not talking about the infected tree
but about an other one of the same species.
I have to be extremely careful in progressing with this one into a bonsai,
not that easy with prunus it seems.
Well i think i have to forget about the infected one, there are to many trees in my garden
to have it really isolated.
thanks, Sunip

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Re: orange jelly

Post  drgonzo on Fri Nov 18, 2011 8:53 pm

sunip wrote:

The wound should be extremely clean and covered for many years till, it will be grown over.
Sunip, Wink

Thats the basic Idea for prevention at all times with Prunus, or for that matter ALL trees you work on, as Jim notes once the tree has it the chances for survival are low. The stress of Bonsai culture always makes our trees more prone to problems than their wild cousins thats why I feel maintaining the trees Vigor is the top priority in Bonsai culture, all else comes secondarily.
Good luck and at the very least its a learning experience.
-Jay

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Re: orange jelly

Post  drgonzo on Fri Nov 18, 2011 9:00 pm

sunip wrote:Hello Jim.
I my last post i was not talking about the infected tree
but about an other one of the same species.
I have to be extremely careful in progressing with this one into a bonsai,
not that easy with prunus it seems.
Well i think i have to forget about the infected one, there are to many trees in my garden
to have it really isolated.
thanks, Sunip

Stone fruits will always give you trouble, but they are a labor of love. Its just the way they are. If its not a mold, its a blight. If its not a blight its a canker, if its not a canker its an insect its ALWAYS something it seems. I have an orchard of 18 dwarf fruit trees and the trees that I always have to fret over are the stone fruits EVERY YEAR...!

But they are just so beautiful, Is it worth it? Sure why not.
-Jay

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Re: orange jelly

Post  sunip on Fri Nov 18, 2011 9:16 pm

Hello Jay,
Yes they are so beautiful in early spring.
It remembers me of a story about an English lord who got rid of his beautiful rose collection in his garden.
He planted instead Dahlias, absolutely not done in his circle of course.
Ask why, because the rose is naturally the queen of all flowers, he answered.
Yes they are the queen of all flowers but they also have the habits of them.
Dahlias are like the farmers wife, never a problem.
Sunip Wink

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Re: orange jelly

Post  ananursing on Sat Mar 31, 2012 5:59 am

Cure all injuries, maintain energy of the shrub, trim out any dead or infected offices, don't leave statement. Try to keep major trimming to may and not when rain is certain. Cure trimming reduces larger than one inch across with a colour of 1% thiram or 3-10% Birdwatcher Naphthalene.

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Re: orange jelly

Post  sunip on Mon Apr 02, 2012 8:13 am

ananursing wrote: Try to keep major trimming to may and not when rain is certain.

Thank you Ananursing,
I read major cutting should be done in the autumn but i understand in may the leaves are hardened
and can give optimal support to callusing the wound.
If i cut the trunk down to start a shohin size tree, may makes more sense.
Sunip

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Re: orange jelly

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