Guy Guidry carving away

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Re: Guy Guidry carving away

Post  Poink88 on Sun Jan 22, 2012 3:52 am

jrodriguez wrote:
Well, coming from a place in which this material is quite common, I have to admit they are really not the best trees to work with. In nature, at least in my neck of the woods, these trees exhibit fluted trunks and no dead wood. They grow in coastal swamps that are under water for quite a few months throughout the year. Even in the dry season, the freatic level makes it possible for the area to remain quite humid. Like bald cypress, the trees exhibit swollen basal flare as a primary characteristic.

Most of the examples I have seen have yet to emulate their true nature. Because dead portions are not commonplace ( at least in Puerto Rico), excessive carving looks anomalous to me.

As far as Nature goes and the fact that branches do not appear in the "right places", it is up to the skill of he artist to place one there!!! These lend themselves to grafting.

I only have one of these in my collection and I have managed to close all wounds to the point that there is no longer a trunk chop. As I said before, because these grow in coastal swamps, they love water. The main reason behind the fact that most "collected" trees of these species have serious sap withdrawal after extraction is lack of water. Almost 100% of the Haematoxylon trees that have been exported to Florida have at least half of the trunk dead.

Kind regards,

Jose Luis

Good info Luis, thanks for sharing. I am not sure why but I love these trees and I now have 5 in my collection (3 just arrived from PR yesterday). I did learn that after it rains, the dried sap expands and start oozing/bleeding again.

I am glad this thread got resurrected. Wink

Poink88
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Re: Guy Guidry carving away

Post  Poink88 on Sun Jan 22, 2012 4:18 am

Rob Kempinski wrote:... I'm a bit biased as in general I don't care much for compound leafed bonsai trees, and the campeche ranks up there as one of the most difficult trees to make look decent. The handling of the chop is usually a big problem but in this photo Guy has done the right thing and induced lots of taper via carving.
Not sure why but I am attracted to compound leafed trees. You are right that the chop are difficult to work with but I am hoping to learn how to integrate it into the bonsai design through carving. I know it will take years to learn (and maybe never) but I am going to give it a try.

Poink88
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Re: Guy Guidry carving away

Post  marcus watts on Sun Jan 22, 2012 9:22 am

hi poink (got to say Poink, not sure your name Very Happy )

I think compound leaves can look appealling as each part of the compound looks like a small leaf of its own so the scale looks 'bonsai like' more than a single stalked larger leaf. In time you realise the tree looks like it has nice ramification until the leaves drop off becaise of all the little leaf stalks, but then the winter image ends up looking course and disapointing. I've seen the compound leaves shortened to just 2 or 3 'side' leaves and this looked good while letting in plenty of light to keep inner areas strong.

To practice trunk carving and tapering just use 1-2ft chopped off logs rather than real trees - you will ruin the first few so dont risk one of your proper material trees until you get a fake one looking good - use it for tanuki then so nothing is wasted. The problem with the pic that started this thread (imho) is the poor way he has carved diagonal grooves across the grain - this is totally rubbish as the aging wood cracks with the grain, cutting across the artificial grooves that were added, so you get an impossible and un-natural finish to the tree. This is just average demo work looking for a quicker result and not the sort of work you should use as an example to base your own learning on.

re the sand blaster - yes it is a simple hand held trigger gun type affair rather than a fully professional built in workshop model:
handheld inexpensive sandblaster

it is an excelent entry level set up to do small bits of work. There is a thread of Tonies with a full workshop set up showing awesome results (i hope Will or someone can find it and link to it maybe?)

cheers Marcus

marcus watts
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Re: Guy Guidry carving away

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