Acacia burkei

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Acacia burkei

Post  Hank Miller on Wed Sep 14, 2011 12:23 am

The twin trunk acacia burkei is taller than one might prefer. However, in southern Africa acacias seldom develop really thick trunks. They do have large canopies. In spite of the fact that I haven't got a giraffe here to keep them pruned the trees bring back fond memories. Enjoy. Hank







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Re: Acacia burkei

Post  Russell Coker on Wed Sep 14, 2011 2:01 am

Taller than one might prefer? The height isn't the problem, it's the pot.

If the root system will allow you to put it in something wide and shallow, do it. You have a great start there, but the pot is terrible.

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Re: Acacia burkei

Post  John Quinn on Wed Sep 14, 2011 2:23 am

I like the tree and especially the fact that it brings back memories for you. I would agree with Russell that the pot does not complement it well. Even though you didn't ask, here is one option for the future. Cool Thanks for posting!


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Re: Acacia burkei

Post  Andrew Legg on Wed Sep 14, 2011 9:16 am

Hey Hank,

Cool tree! Just remember that Acacias have quite poor root systems, so if you put it in a new pot, just be sure it is no too shallow as it may not like that. The tree looks really healthy!

Cheers,

Andrew

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Re: Acacia burkei

Post  GerhardGerber on Wed Sep 14, 2011 1:58 pm

Hi Hank

Very nice tree, but you've got the name wrong, we've (africa) lost the rights to Acacia! Twisted Evil
.....Just as long as you don't ask me the new name! Laughing Laughing

If the root system will allow

That's the thing, it won't.

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Re: Acacia burkei

Post  Andrew Legg on Wed Sep 14, 2011 2:14 pm

GerhardGerber wrote:Hi Hank

Very nice tree, but you've got the name wrong, we've (africa) lost the rights to Acacia! Twisted Evil
.....Just as long as you don't ask me the new name! Laughing Laughing

Hey Gerhard, maybe if we just keep calling it an Acacia, nobody will notice! Twisted Evil

Here's some info on it for those that may be interested. It sounds like something out of MacBeth!! This is of course one side of the story.


"For more than two and a half centuries Africa has been home to acacia trees, but now nine people have decided for the entire world that only Australia can lay claim to the botanical name Acacia, and everyone else must now call their acacia trees something else.

The Australians, who have about 1,000 species of acacia trees that are indigenous to their continent, approached the botanical naming committee with a crafty appeal that won them the right to the genus name Acacia. That this appeal was not well known anywhere other than Australia is evidenced by the fact that this happened last July without causing so much as a ripple in the rest of the world’s media.

Eugene Moll, chairman of the council of the Botanical Society of South Africa, reports in Veld & Flora that the appeal was made “without much, if any official, consultation with all African, South American and Asian citizens.” Africa will now have to call its acacias by the name Senegalia. The decision that Australia could annex the title Acacia goes against the normal rules of taxonomy, the science that gives names to all living organisms, both alive and extinct.

In taxonomy, “the accepted rule is that the earliest published name has precedence”, but the Australians have waived this rule claiming special circumstances, despite the fact that the first named acacia was an African tree. The tree was described in 1753, and was Acacia scorpoides, now known as Acacia nilotica (scented thorn, lekkerruikpeul).

Thirty-seven taxonomists are currently appealing the decision, but the outcome is not yet known. Moll comments, “We surely cannot allow the Australians to steal the name that is as much a part of Africa as cheetah and the Big Five?” Those wishing to object the name change can email info@botanicalsociety.org.za."

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Re: Acacia burkei

Post  Russell Coker on Wed Sep 14, 2011 2:15 pm

GerhardGerber wrote:
If the root system will allow

That's the thing, it won't.

From the looks of this tree (lack of nebari) and what Andrew said, that was my fear. Sometimes the best pot selection style-wise just won't work horticulturally. Certainly there is a happy medium between John's suggestion and what it's in now.

Hank, how have you grown such a nice tree in NY?

R

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Re: Acacia burkei

Post  Andrew Legg on Wed Sep 14, 2011 2:36 pm

Russel, Hank,

Acacias have few roots and they tend to be quite thick with not too much ramification. Getting them to ramify can be hard work, so I use quite a sharp mix. It is a bit early for me to comment on whether or not this makes much of a difference, but one thing I can say from my experience is that these trees make lovely seikei subjects as you can plant them up a bit and mx in some rocks etc. Just something to think about.

Cheers,

Andrew

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Re: Acacia burkei

Post  coh on Wed Sep 14, 2011 2:58 pm

I think the tree looks pretty good. If anything, I think it might look better if the lower half of the trunk was a little thinner, as this would enhance the "elegance" of the composition...if that makes any sense.

How tall is the tree?

Chris

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Re: Acacia burkei

Post  Hank Miller on Wed Sep 14, 2011 3:00 pm

Thanks for the comments and suggestions. I agree that a shallower pot should be used. The problem with acacias is that they develop a large tap root and not much in the way of surface roots (hence the lack of good nebari in most acacias). This is one of the reasons that there are so few collected acacias. I have found that there are 2 ways to get them to grow and thrive in shallow containers: 1] Very young trees can be planted in shallow containers - this retards the formation of a strong tap root. Fortunately the trees grow quickly - the 2 treesI have used were grown from seed and are about 4 years old ; 2] With more mature trees the tap root must be reduced over a period of time. I have found by placing them in smaller containers whose depth is reduced with each transplanting they eventually develop a sufficiently shallow root system and can then be moved into a shallower container. Care must then be taken that the trees are not over watered.

Next spring I plan to move them into a shallower container.

Thanks for the info about the name change. I was not aware that it had taken place. To me they are and will remain acacias.

Russell as strange as it may seem my acacias do really well in western NY. I think it is a combination of increased sunlight (the long summer days) as well as humidity. In the summer when they are outside they thrive and require constant pruning. In the winter months I bring them into my green house where they continue to grow well. During the winter months care must be taken to reduce the watering drastically.

Chris the taller tree is roughly 16 inches high.

Regards
Hank

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Re: Acacia burkei

Post  my nellie on Wed Sep 14, 2011 3:32 pm

Andrew Legg wrote: ... ... Moll comments, “We surely cannot allow the Australians to steal the name that is as much a part of Africa as cheetah and the Big Five?” ... ...
Exactly so!
Africa and acacia images are interwoven in an unbroken bond!
And no Committees will ever be able to change Africa's images in peoples' mind.

Thank you all for the interesting notes about acacia cultivation. Lately one seed of acacia germinated into a jardiniere of mine all by itself and now I am nurturing a lovely, fragile seedling.
Could you please list some main points that I should have in mind?
Can I prune the tap root little by little during every repotting?

Thank you.

my nellie
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Re: Acacia burkei

Post  Hank Miller on Thu Sep 15, 2011 7:03 pm

I have grown many acacia from seed and also from cuttings. With both seedlings and cuttings let them grow and develop some kind of a root system for a year or so before attempting any type of pruning. Even if elongated branches occur these can be pruned back and the cuttings can be planted. Always leave a stub (this can be removed after the new buds sprout). Also, better to have a tap root which can eventually be reduced than a dead tree. Acacias like well draining soils as has been pointed out. Watering, particularly in the dormant season must be cut back drastically. I have an irrigation system and in mid winter I water most of my tropicals about once a week. Remember in most of southern Africa the dormant season is the dry season - little or no rain for 4-5 months. During the growing season I fertilize my trees often - every 7-10 days. Acacias thrive on this.

I hope this is of some help.

Regards
Hank

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Re: Acacia burkei

Post  Randy_Davis on Thu Sep 15, 2011 10:05 pm

For anyone intrested the proposed new name for African Acacia's is "Protoacacia". Just a proposal though with no decision made yet. Here's the link to the Topic in detail

http://christiankull.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/turland-2011-taxon.pdf

Randy

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Re: Acacia burkei

Post  my nellie on Fri Sep 16, 2011 7:19 am

Hank Miller wrote: ... ... I hope this is of some help.
Regards
Hank
Yes, indeed this is Hank!
Thank you very much!
Now I know what was wrong with a seedling which I collected and cultivated for six months but died last year..., must be the watering during winter.

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