Buttonwood

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Buttonwood

Post  Ed Trout on Mon Aug 01, 2011 8:27 pm

I got this buttonwood from Mary Miller last year, and am in the process of forcing additional ramification in the branches & apex. In lieu of a complete leaf pruning, I tend to just cut the leaves in half, which still rapidly stimulates back budding, and buds at the leaf itself. I'd like it to be about 4-5 inches taller than it is now, and then I'll begin reducing the lengths. I hate a tree with no movement !! Laughing

Ed Trout

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Re: Buttonwood

Post  Russell Coker on Mon Aug 01, 2011 9:19 pm

I can't imagine why you wanted THAT ugly thing! Rolling Eyes

God, I love buttonwoods, but they are nothing but a slow, tortuous death in my hands. Maybe Mitch can share how he keeps them alive outside Florida...

Looks like a keeper to me!

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Re: Buttonwood

Post  Rob Kempinski on Mon Aug 01, 2011 9:59 pm

Know what you mean Ed, that trunk is so straight! If you just can't stand it in the future some time I know a good home for it. Surprised
Good luck with it. Will make a great logo tree!


Speaking of keeping buttonwoods outside their zone, the new editor of the BCI magazine keeps a great buttonwood collection in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.


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Re: Buttonwood

Post  kauaibonsai on Mon Aug 01, 2011 11:58 pm

beautiful movement

best wishes, sam

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Re: Buttonwood

Post  Mitch Thomas on Tue Aug 02, 2011 12:48 am

Hey Ed
I have to agree with everyone else on this ugly tree. As a public service I can dispose of it for you.
I will glady pay all shipping and handling for you to ship to my salvage site " Mitch's Button Wood rescue"

Ha ha ha just kidding.

I love this tree. Buttonwoods just have so much character. I have had two now for almost 10yrs. And I also have one that I did with Ed in SanAntonio at The ABS event a few years ago. If it stops raining I'll post a photo.

Russell if you teach me how to keep Azaleas, I'll teach you how to keep Buttonwoods.

Here are a couple of tips i use. The first is you can not overwater them. Second no temps below 40 degrees. I winter mine ia a greenhouse the pots are set in water trays with aquarium heaters submerged and set to 70 degrees. That's all I do to them.

Mitch Thomas

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Re: Buttonwood

Post  Todd Ellis on Tue Aug 02, 2011 1:37 am

What a great buttonwood! Beautiful!
I had great success growing a medium size button wood for four seasons under flourescents during the cold periods and outside in full sun during the warm weather (Piedmont Virginia). It thrived. I fed it regularly during the warm seasons. The only pests were white flies and ocassional scale which were easy to get rid of.
Best,
Todd

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Re: Buttonwood

Post  Russell Coker on Tue Aug 02, 2011 2:03 am

Mitch Thomas wrote:Here are a couple of tips i use. The first is you can not overwater them. Second no temps below 40 degrees. I winter mine ia a greenhouse the pots are set in water trays with aquarium heaters submerged and set to 70 degrees. That's all I do to them.

Well, Mitch, that confirms my suspicions. Some tropicals are far more tolerant of cold temps and flucuations than others. I only protect my ficus from freezes. Frosts don't get to it under my live oak. Buttonwoods are far less forgiving. And God help you if you water them with cold water. I think you've found the perfect solution.


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Re: Buttonwood

Post  coh on Tue Aug 02, 2011 2:46 am

Ed - sweet tree! But what happened - I thought you were going to turn it into a formal upright? Wink

Todd - dare I ask the obvious question - what became of the buttonwood after those 4 seasons?

Chris

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Re: Buttonwood

Post  Todd Ellis on Tue Aug 02, 2011 2:50 am

I sold it to a bonsai collector when I needed some money! Bagpiper
I was able to grow a nice canopy in those four years.

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Re: Buttonwood

Post  Mitch Thomas on Tue Aug 02, 2011 4:15 am

Hey Russell /
I forgot something Mary Madison told me years ago. If my memory serves me she said Conocarpus Erectus has a few slight variations and the specimens with the red stems are the hardiest of all. Luckly all mine are of this varration.

Anyone please correct me if my memory fails me.

Mitch

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Re: Buttonwood

Post  Ed Trout on Tue Aug 02, 2011 1:12 pm


Thanks for your kind comments guys,

You will all be happy to know that this buttonwood slept very well last night knowing that if it ever "runs away from home", it has someone who will take it in. Very Happy As I travel around the country, I am continually amazed at what bonsai folks will do to keep tropicals alive in their area. I still remember years ago, walking down into Dustin Mann's basement on a cold, wet, dark, dreary late November day in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and seeing a beautiful tropical garden under lights that almost blinded me, with bright green ficus, bougainvilleas blooming, and all sorts of healthy trees ! It was mind blowing !! Where there is a will, there is a way. And Mitch, you are correct....the buttonwoods with sharp pointed leaves, and bright red petioles that extend into the leaf veins are the best for bonsai (IMHO). The leaves reduce better, the internodes are true and shorter, and they seem to be hardier to the elements. Chris....We could call this "formal upright gone wrong" !!

Ed

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Re: Buttonwood

Post  Sam Ogranaja on Wed Sep 28, 2011 3:11 pm

Beautiful tree Ed!!!! Keep us posted with pictures.

Have a great week!!!
Sam

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Re: Buttonwood

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