Beackea Frutescens

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Beackea Frutescens

Post  idros on Wed Jul 20, 2011 3:49 am


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Re: Beackea Frutescens

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Wed Jul 20, 2011 12:13 pm

This is a species we in the west need to learn more about.

also see

3rd Malaysia Bonsai Carnival-Baeckea Frutescens almost steal the show


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Re: Beackea Frutescens

Post  PkWk on Wed Jul 20, 2011 3:15 pm

Check this out. More about Baeckea Frutescens and Premna in this region.
http://matyiegarden.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2011-03-03T08%3A41%3A00%2B08%3A00&max-results=7

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Re: Beackea Frutescens

Post  ndleong on Fri Jul 22, 2011 3:26 am

I was told that this species use to grow near beaches. In bonsai it can simply just use sea sand to grow it. This make me wonder how the plant will get it nutrientient by growing on sea sand. Any idea what type of alternative soil which is suitable for this spesies.

Regards, Nd

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Re: Beackea Frutescens

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Fri Jul 22, 2011 10:09 am

ndleong wrote:I was told that this species use to grow near beaches. In bonsai it can simply just use sea sand to grow it. This makes me wonder how the plant will get it nutrients by growing on sea sand. Any idea what type of alternative soil which is suitable for this species.

Regards, Nd

It would depend upon how close to the sea the plant will grow. There are some "salt tolerant" plants that have developed systems to grow in water with salt levels that would kill other plants. In Florida the Mangrove actually excretes salt from its leaves. Sea water contains a lot of chemicals that a plant can use, so "sea sand" unless washed out would also contain chemicals plants can use, the problem is most plants can't tolerate the high level of some salts. Also rainwater contains a lot of nutrients.
It sounds like this plant requires a well-drained soil. I suspect any well-drained soil with a minimum of organic matter would work. Nutrients could be supplied with liquid fertilizers or even manure teas.

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Re: Beackea Frutescens

Post  khat_lp on Sun Oct 20, 2013 12:34 pm

Hi Idros: Can you talk about how you put wild plants potted bonsai in training
Thanks alot:heart: I love you 

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Re: Beackea Frutescens

Post  fiona on Sun Oct 20, 2013 7:37 pm

Idros hasn't been on the site since January, so don't be worried if he/she doesn't respond.

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Re: Beackea Frutescens

Post  khat_lp on Mon Oct 21, 2013 11:20 am

fiona wrote:Idros hasn't been on the site since January, so don't be worried if he/she doesn't respond.
Thanks Fiona

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Re: Beackea Frutescens

Post  SophiaGardener on Thu Oct 24, 2013 6:10 pm

These kind of species are really hard to grow because they need a proper atmosphere to grow otherwise all your work will be ruined.

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Re: Beackea Frutescens

Post  Down Under Jason on Fri Oct 25, 2013 5:13 am

Love the Beackea, such a pretty little tree, is definatley one of the species I'm looking forward to playing with more. Have a few growing on at the moment (Virgata's) that I'm not too far from getting into some training pots. Am very excited Smile

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Re: Beackea Frutescens

Post  mikacarrick on Tue Jan 14, 2014 1:24 am

Thanks Jason!!!!! i was searching for the name of another baeckea tree that we have here. it is B. Virgata!!!!! thanks very much. but baeckea frutescens and virgata have very much difference in height. virgata is a small plant, which will grow until 2-2.5 feet at most.. i think. but frutescnes, they can exceed 9 feet tall. virgata's leave is a bit broad compared to frutescens, and maybe shorter? but both got very tiny leaves. frutescens can be found near beach, or at mountain area. but the one near the beach got more interesting character. thanks again!!!! really appreciate it that u mention the name here.

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Re: Beackea Frutescens

Post  Down Under Jason on Tue Jan 14, 2014 7:02 am

No problems :)The virgata can grow up to about 3meters, but there is a dwarf form which I recently aquired that reaches about 30cms to a meter.. The leaves and flowers are even smaller on that variety!

Its due for its initital styling soon, so will post some pictures up when its ready Smile

Also, I do beleive Baeckea Virgata is now known as Babingtongia Virgata. In fact, it might have even changed a third time... and am just clarifying that now

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Re: Beackea Frutescens

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