landscape stone

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landscape stone

Post  nguyển thái lý on Thu Jun 09, 2011 6:36 am

hello forum IBC

I do not know how to describe this rock, I found it very nice, but do not know how to name it, for you will give my opinion on this rock,thank

nguyển thái lý
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Re: landscape stone

Post  Chris Cochrane on Thu Jun 09, 2011 2:17 pm

Hi NTL... The photo is leaning at a poor horizontal angle to appreciate the stone's front. For suiseki-style appreciation, the figurine (pagoda?) set on the top, right side is oddly placed for expression-- it limits rather than expands the view & adversely affects visual flow; the figurine reduces options for perceiving the stone. The broad table of the lower tier suggests considering it as either an extensive flat ground (slope/plateau, step/cascade/terrace or distant 'shelter rock' stone) or more limited piece of ground ('hut on tableland' stone). It is perhaps best to avoid a classification of contour that limits the imagination.

Rotating the image may or may not be a true view from the front, but it comes closer to arrangement which aids appreciation.


Last edited by Chris Cochrane on Thu Jun 09, 2011 4:43 pm; edited 2 times in total

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Re: landscape stone

Post  nguyển thái lý on Thu Jun 09, 2011 3:20 pm

hello Chris, I will draw experience for next time, I thought the pictures would do well to ice, so I put it in, I have learned from experience chris, thank you very much

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Re: landscape stone

Post  Chris Cochrane on Thu Jun 09, 2011 4:42 pm

I like the stone & its mounting. By not naming it as a particular view, it has more imaginative presence. In an intimate lesson on display (e.g. Keido-style), a host might reveal one scene intended for a particular guest and another scene intended for another guest. Choices of utensils in tea ceremony often carry particular & different allusions for guests chosen at a single gathering.

The visual flow from-right-to-left is strong and appealing. No breaks or rough edges appear, and the depth as well as the profile of the daiza suggest that the stone has a natural bottom.

Can you share who carved the stone's seat/daiza?

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Re: landscape stone

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