New hobiest

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Re: New hobiest

Post  GeraldHeystek on Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:00 pm



i cant seem to figure out what it is?

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Re: New hobiest

Post  Russell Coker on Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:03 pm

Try Celtis, I would guess africana.

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Re: New hobiest

Post  GeraldHeystek on Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:09 pm

It seems that you are correct, whats the common name?

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Re: New hobiest

Post  Randy_Davis on Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:20 pm

GeraldHeystek wrote:It seems that you are correct, whats the common name?

I'd call it a sickly "hackberry".

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Re: New hobiest

Post  Russell Coker on Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:22 pm

Well, that's why Latin names are so important.

It appears that most of the western word calls Celtis "hackberry", but it looks like this is called "White Stinkwood, Camdeboo Stinkwood, and Witstinkhout" in your neck of the woods. One of our native Celtis is often called "sugarberry" here in the American South.

Celtis are good bonsai material, btw.

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Re: New hobiest

Post  Russell Coker on Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:38 pm

Randy_Davis wrote:
GeraldHeystek wrote:It seems that you are correct, whats the common name?

I'd call it a sickly "hackberry".

Randy's right about that!

Gerald, this is as good a time as any to point out a big problem. Ask yourself why a guy in Alabama, half a world away from you, is identifying plant material growing under YOUR nose AND giving you it's common South African names. It just doesn't seem that you're quite as attuned to the world around you as you think you are. If there were ever anyone out there who would benefit from local (as in a club) knowledge, it's YOU!! Quite buying seeds from somewhere else and LEARN something from your "Stinkwood".


Last edited by Russell Coker on Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:22 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: New hobiest

Post  GeraldHeystek on Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:40 pm

My dad is somewhat of a nature lover as well, he just came around here , and confirmed it is a "witstinkhout boom", afrikaans for white stinkwood. I am rather exited about your last part of the post, it being a good bonsai tree, i was scared to buy something useless. i dont think that i will be able to sleep tonight. ill use the time to check up on the tree prefered growing conditions.

Thank you very much for showing interest.

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Re: New hobiest

Post  GeraldHeystek on Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:48 pm

I am well aware that i have a lot to learn, i am not a tree expert, but with time i will learn all these names, and spesies. I am actualy more of a jock than scientist. the problem with the clubs are that the closest one to me is about 60 km from wher i stay on the outskirts of johannesburg (Westonaria), i will take me atleast a hour and a halfs drive every time in good trafic, its not that i dont want to go, it make me mad that in south africa , ther usualy aren't as much of anything, and if it exists most of the time its few and far between. i want to learn more, and thats why i joined this club, to speak to other enthusiasts about a common intrest.

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Re: New hobiest

Post  GeraldHeystek on Mon Mar 07, 2011 3:50 pm

o , and another thing, does it look sick to you aswell, i found that the drain holes where completely plugged by roots, and the ground was soggy, i dont think thats good. but i thought maybe it should be as the lady at the nursery told me its a chinese maple...

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Re: New hobiest

Post  Russell Coker on Mon Mar 07, 2011 4:24 pm

Chinese maple... that's why it always pays to do your homework!

Gerald, if I were you, I'd contact Andrew Legg. He's in Capetown. I know that's not anywhere close to you, but at least he's in the same country! There may be other South Africans on this forum, but I know of him for sure. Why not send him a private message? He may be able to point you in the right direction, and give you some contact info for someone in your area. Nothing ventured, nothing gained. There's only so much help we can provide from afar.

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Re: New hobiest

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:22 pm

Gerald,

Celtis africana, makes a beautiful bonsai. My own is in the refrigerator presently, but you can see it after April 1st.
Find out what is a well draining soil mix for your side and plant it in that.
New plants can be had from cuttings and the root.

You may wish to look for Buddleja saligna.

http://www.africantrees.com/details.asp?treeID=18

http://www.google.com/images?rlz=1T4TSHB_en___TT342&q=buddleja+saligna+bonsai&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi&biw=897&bih=361

Best to you.
Khaimraj

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Re: New hobiest

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Mon Mar 07, 2011 5:25 pm

African Olive scroll down

http://www.vlbanting.com/teachingbonsaiinsouthafr.htm

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Re: New hobiest

Post  GeraldHeystek on Mon Mar 07, 2011 6:23 pm

I'll take a decent picture of the tree tomorrow, i changed about half of the soil with some finer sand, and i put in a rock and dead wood just to make it liik bette, because they where mot realy looking after it, it has no leaves anymore unfortunately, the one i had where on the ground under the tree. the leaves didn't look sick did they?

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Re: New hobiest

Post  GeraldHeystek on Mon Mar 07, 2011 6:24 pm

What style would be the best for these type of tree?

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Re: New hobiest

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Mon Mar 07, 2011 6:28 pm

I drive 100 miles round trip each month to a club meeting. I will admit that this past weekend there was a club activity at a bonsai nursery 200 miles round trip and I didn't go.

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Re: New hobiest

Post  GeraldHeystek on Mon Mar 07, 2011 6:32 pm

It doesnt sound like a lot, but at this stage of the game for me it is.

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Re: New hobiest

Post  Khaimraj Seepersad on Mon Mar 07, 2011 7:21 pm


Celtis africana bonsai -
http://www.google.com/images?rlz=1T4TSHB_en___TT342&q=celtis+africana+bonsai&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi&biw=897&bih=361

Celtis Africana tree
http://www.google.com/images?um=1&hl=en&safe=off&rlz=1T4TSHB_en___TT342&biw=897&bih=361&tbs=isch:1&btnG=Search&aq=f&aqi=&oq=&q=celtis%20africana

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Re: New hobiest

Post  Russell Coker on Mon Mar 07, 2011 11:27 pm

GeraldHeystek wrote:What style would be the best for these type of tree?

Ah, maybe there's hope. But let's not put the cart before the horse. First, we need to get your hackberry healthy and happy. We don't want to kill it, remember?

Now is the time for you to start looking at deciduous trees as bonsai. Hackberries, elms and zelkovas usually get the "modified broom" treatment, but other styles work well too. Here's where your love of nature comes into play. Your father recognized this plant, get him to take you where they are growing wild or show you some growing unmolested in a park. Study them and let them tell you about their "style". Then look at other trees around you and how they grow, and how they react to different forces around them. Are they close to water, on high exposed elevation, or protected in valleys? You have to open your eyes and really see the trees around you. Get a field guide and learn their names and ranges, you won't be sorry.

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Re: New hobiest

Post  GeraldHeystek on Tue Mar 08, 2011 3:25 am

I will do that for sure, the whole point is to make it look like a miniature version of a full size tree, ok i see. He said he will bring me a book that gives me a bit more info into the natural suroundings of this tree, and ones that like the same thing.

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Re: New hobiest

Post  handy mick on Tue Mar 08, 2011 7:12 am

Gerald try this place, I just Googled Bonsai South Africa Johannesberg.
I hope this helps

GAUTENG PROVINCE
JOHANNESBURG - Eastern Bonsai Society
Contact: Errol Rubin
PO Box 2116
Houghton 2041, South Africa
Tel - 27-83-419-3109, Fax - 27-11-804-3160
E-mail:bonsai@pixie.co.za

Regards
Mick

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Re: New hobiest

Post  handy mick on Tue Mar 08, 2011 7:15 am

Fairmont Nursery in Johannesburg now has a section dedicated to bonsai. It is run by the South African Bonsai Society

How about this

regards Mick

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Re: New hobiest

Post  GeraldHeystek on Tue Mar 08, 2011 3:30 pm

This is the little tree in question, please have a look at it, and let me know if you see something wrong or good, i am thinking about collecting some a tree or two from outside town, do anyone have any thoughts on this?

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Re: New hobiest

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Tue Mar 08, 2011 3:39 pm

I can't speak to South African law, but in the US the plants on my property belong to me and if you remove one without my written permission I can have you arrested. Taking a plant from public land can be even more serious.

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Re: New hobiest

Post  fiona on Tue Mar 08, 2011 6:28 pm

There have been many threads on what we call "collecting" on this forum and every time the first and most important piece of the advice is the same: find out what the national/local law is in your country/area and then obtain the appropriate permissions. As Billy points out, doing it the other way around can have serious consequences. And remember there are some plants which have protected status and you are simply not allowed to take them.

After that, you would benefit from learning quite a bit more about how you collect trees from the wild. This includes things like what is the best time, what do you do in advance (sometimes the collecting process needs to start one, two, three years in advance of the actual digging up), how you would actually dig the tree up (e.g. how much root to take), and lastly what do you do once the tree is out of the ground. And by the way that last bit almost always involves a period of letting the plant recover in a training pot. It's all about doing your best to ensure the survival of the tree.

What you should be seeing here is the continuation of the pattern already establised in your thread that nothing happens quickly in bonsai. It's all very rewarding of course once you master the patience aspect.

Good luck.

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Re: New hobiest

Post  GeraldHeystek on Tue Mar 08, 2011 6:35 pm

Of coarse i ask to get more info, i only ask because i don't know. i am not a patient person of nature but i have extreme self control and discipline, so im sore i can be patient if i need to be. The whole point for me is to grow bonsai that i can Love and cherish for years to come. Its part of a my love for life that compels me to give back that witch i have received.

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Re: New hobiest

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