Sorbus domestica

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Sorbus domestica

Post  p@scal on Mon Feb 14, 2011 10:29 am

Hello IBC Smile

Seeking info, someone tried Sorbus domestica you it is rare for bonsai?

Thank you, Pascal

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Re: Sorbus domestica

Post  JimLewis on Mon Feb 14, 2011 1:47 pm

Compound leaves on the ash family make it a very difficult plant to turn into bonsai.

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Re: Sorbus domestica

Post  Guest on Mon Feb 14, 2011 2:52 pm

JimLewis wrote:Compound leaves on the ash family make it a very difficult plant to turn into bonsai.

I disagree Jim. The Mountain Ash (which is not Ash but Sorbus) is very similar to domestica and they make very good bonsai.

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Re: Sorbus domestica

Post  JimLewis on Mon Feb 14, 2011 4:12 pm

Well, I misread or misremembered. Still it takes quite a lot of work to make a decent bonsai out of compound leaves.

I'd be happy to see a mountain ash in a show.

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Sorbus domestica

Post  Guest on Mon Feb 14, 2011 4:22 pm

Found this image on Google. It doesn't appear to be under copyright. Mountain Ash.

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Sorbus domestica

Post  bonsaisr on Mon Feb 14, 2011 4:34 pm

If you Google on Sorbus bonsai you will find a slew of them. There is an article at Bonsai4Me. The species most commonly used is S. aucuparia, the rowan tree. American growers occasionally use the native S. americana, & there are hybrids. Since the rowan tree is useful for witches, it should make a good companion for those two-legged ents. Basketball
By the way, Sorbus belongs to the Rosaceae & is heir to all the ills of that family. Crying or Very sad
Lifespan is about 40 years, I believe.
Iris

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Sorbus domestica

Post  Guest on Mon Feb 14, 2011 4:50 pm

Hello Iris. Mountain Ash lives for about 100 years and there are specimens in excess of 400 years.

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Re: Sorbus domestica

Post  p@scal on Mon Feb 14, 2011 7:53 pm

will baddeley wrote:Found this image on Google. It doesn't appear to be under copyright. Mountain Ash.




Not bad, the tree picture
Thank you

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Sorbus Domestica

Post  sunip on Tue Feb 15, 2011 9:31 am

Hi Pascal,
This is a tree grown out of nursery material.
When you look at the site of Wolfgang Putz of Austria you will find also a picture with the red fruits on.
I have some seedlings in the ground and plan in the future to do something with them.
regards, Sunip Wink

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Re: Sorbus domestica

Post  p@scal on Tue Feb 15, 2011 2:40 pm

Sunip thank you, I'd have one in bonsai, it is increasingly rare in our country, he is listed as endangered species in Switzerland and Austria to France, I do not know Question

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Sorbus domestica

Post  bonsaisr on Tue Feb 15, 2011 3:44 pm

will baddeley wrote:Hello Iris. Mountain Ash lives for about 100 years and there are specimens in excess of 400 years.
Interesting. We are talking about different species. Ran into the same discrepancy with birch. Our local white birches only live about 15 years, but Walter Pall said the European weeping birch lives much longer.
So when you are planning to use an unfamiliar tree for bonsai, find out more about the particular species you have in mind, not just the genus.
Iris

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Sorbus Domestica

Post  sunip on Tue Feb 15, 2011 6:42 pm

Hi Pascal.
In the Netherlands they are found everywhere, the birds like the fruit
and de birds droppings does the rest.
Hi Iris I now some European Birches who are in the range of a hundred years.
regards, Sunip Wink

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Sorbus Domestica

Post  Guest on Tue Feb 15, 2011 7:32 pm

sunip wrote:Hi Pascal.
In the Netherlands they are found everywhere, the birds like the fruit
and de birds droppings does the rest.
Hi Iris I now some European Birches who are in the range of a hundred years.
regards, Sunip Wink

Hello Sunip. Are you sure your talking about the same tree? I think you are talking about Sorbus Aucuparia(Mountain Ash), rather than Sorbus domestica(True Service tree, or Whitty pear). They look very similar but the fruit of domestica are edible and taste like Apricots, whereas the fruit of aucuparia taste like Paracetamol. Domestica is very rare in the wild.

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Re: Sorbus domestica

Post  fiona on Tue Feb 15, 2011 7:37 pm

Hey Will.

Why are there no painkillers in the jungle?



I shall allow you your badoom ching moment and not answer that myself.

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Re: Sorbus domestica

Post  Guest on Tue Feb 15, 2011 7:47 pm

fiona wrote:Hey Will.

Why are there no painkillers in the jungle?



I shall allow you your badoom ching moment and not answer that myself.

Cos the Parrots eat em ol...

We in tbe Baddeley household, went through an experimental phase with different homemade wines. One book in particular, recomended a fine wine made from Rowan(aucuparia)berries. A long maturing was recomended and when we finally came to the tasting it was bloody discusting. If you consider a Bulldog licking piss from a Nettle a good look, then Rowan berry wine is the one for you.

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Re: Sorbus domestica

Post  Jay Gaydosh on Tue Feb 15, 2011 7:52 pm

Funny this has all poopped up here. The photo of the Sorbus domestica, is actually one shown on Wolfgang Putz's website. He has it listed as Sorbus aucuparia http://www.yamadori-bonsai.info/Putz19.html

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Sorbus domestica

Post  Guest on Tue Feb 15, 2011 8:04 pm

It is aucuparia(Mountain Ash) Jay. As domestica is rare in the wild, it must be even rarer as bonsai. I posted the picture of the Mountain Ash as they are very similar and I couldn't find an image of domestica.

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Re: Sorbus domestica

Post  Jay Gaydosh on Tue Feb 15, 2011 8:28 pm

Thanks for clearing that up, Will. With S. domestica and S. aucuparia being bounced back and forth, and then someone said to look at Wolfgang's I found it interesting that your Google search actually pulled up the tree id did! I was fairly impressed with my quick determination that the Google tree and Wolfgang's were the same tree. Either way, it's a great tree!

bonsaisr wrote:Since the rowan tree is useful for witches, it should make a good companion for those two-legged ents. Basketball
Iris

Iris, when stating rowan tree is useful for witches, did you mean that witches use the rowan tree for "witchy purposes or that others use the rowan tree for burning witches?

Originally from New England. my recollection of witch history might find the answer useful down the road! Laughing

Jay

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Sorbus domestica

Post  Guest on Tue Feb 15, 2011 8:35 pm

The European rowan (S. aucuparia) has a long tradition in European mythology and folklore. It was thought to be a magical tree and protection against malevolent beings.[4] It was said in England that this was the tree on which the Devil hanged his mother.[8]


Mistletoe growing on a Rowan.The density of the rowan wood makes it very usable for walking sticks and magician's staves. This is why druid staffs, for example, have traditionally been made out of rowan wood, and its branches were often used in dowsing rods and magic wands[citation needed]. Rowan was carried on vessels to avoid storms, kept in houses to guard against lightning, and even planted on graves to keep the deceased from haunting. It was also used to protect one from witches.[9] Often birds' droppings contain rowan seeds, and if such droppings land in a fork or hole where old leaves have accumulated on a larger tree, such as an oak or a maple, they may result in a rowan growing as an epiphyte on the larger tree. Such a rowan is called a "flying rowan" and was thought of as especially potent against witches and their magic, and as a counter-charm against sorcery.[10] Rowan's alleged protection against enchantment made it perfect to be used in making rune staves (Murray, p. 26), for metal divining, and to protect cattle from harm by attaching sprigs to their sheds. Leaves and berries were added to divination incense for better scrying

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Sorbus Domestica

Post  sunip on Tue Feb 15, 2011 8:45 pm

Hi Pascal, Will and all,
Will you are right i am talking about the Sorbus Aucuparia,
Sorbus Domestica is a different tree with bigger fruits and bigger leaves.
Sorry for the confusion i caused, i should have looked that up first.
Yep the Wolfgang Putz tree is a Sorbus Aucuparia.
regards, Sunip Rolling Eyes

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Re: Sorbus domestica

Post  Walter Pall on Wed Feb 16, 2011 5:29 am

Here you find the development of a Sorbus acuparia in my garden. Mind you, this is in erarly days of development.
Sorbus domestica does exist in wilderness, but extremely rarely. I know of one bonsai. I had one which was a botanical curiosity but did not give me much hope for bonsai. So I gave it to Lena, my assitant. May well be a famous and very rare bonsai in twenty years. Sorry, no images available.

http://walter-pall.de/otherdrowan_nr__1.jpg.dir/index.html







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Re: Sorbus domestica

Post  Guest on Sun Feb 20, 2011 11:12 am

will baddeley wrote:
Hello Sunip. Are you sure your talking about the same tree? I think you are talking about Sorbus Aucuparia(Mountain Ash), rather than Sorbus domestica(True Service tree, or Whitty pear). They look very similar but the fruit of domestica are edible and taste like Apricots, whereas the fruit of aucuparia taste like Paracetamol. Domestica is very rare in the wild.

OK. Having just planted a handful of Sorbus seeds (that I collected towards the end of last year) I was determined to sit passively, read and learn. But now you've all got me so confused that I must speak up.

Which is the one with the red berries? Aucupainia or Domestica? Which ever it is, it is in great abundance here in the south of Sweden.

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Re: Sorbus domestica

Post  Guest on Sun Feb 20, 2011 6:14 pm

Hello Scion. I would put money on yours being Sorbus aucuparia(Mountain Ash or Rowan). As mentioned before, domestica is very rare in the wild but they both have red berries, albeit larger on domestica.

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Re: Sorbus domestica

Post  Guest on Mon Feb 21, 2011 4:55 pm

will baddeley wrote:Hello Scion. ............. both have red berries ....

Typical! Mad

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Re: Sorbus domestica

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