Sugata-ishi

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Sugata-ishi

Post  Milan Kulhavy on Sat Jan 29, 2011 4:37 pm

Monk in a cloak with a hood over his head. How do you like?


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Re: Sugata-ishi

Post  Kev Bailey on Sat Jan 29, 2011 5:00 pm

I like it very much. A very expressive stone.

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Re: Sugata-ishi

Post  Guest on Sat Jan 29, 2011 6:00 pm

Elegant, beatyfull....how tall is the stone?.

Kind regards Yvonne

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Re: Sugata-ishi

Post  Chris Cochrane on Sun Jan 30, 2011 1:31 am

This is a great full-figure stone, Milan. I would encourage you not to refer to it as "a monk in a cloak" for suiseki appreciation. The figure will be recognized by a viewer without naming. If named, it should be referenced as a particular, spiritually elevated figure.

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Re: Sugata-ishi

Post  Milan Kulhavy on Sun Jan 30, 2011 8:41 am

I'm glad you like the stone and a good note the name of the stone.
The stone is 17 cm tall. The stone I got from my friend, President ESA Igor Barta, in a joint search for stones in the Jizera river in the summer of 2009.

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Re: Sugata-ishi

Post  Guest on Sun Jan 30, 2011 8:45 am

Both you and Igor has a good eye for stones....
I was in China with, among many more, Igor. We had a great time. Very Happy

kind regards Yvonne

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Re: Sugata-ishi

Post  vlado on Sun Jan 30, 2011 5:44 pm

Hi Milane
...nice stone, how are you doing yoseki, rubbing with hands, or pouring with water...
vlado

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Re: Sugata-ishi

Post  Milan Kulhavy on Sun Jan 30, 2011 5:56 pm

Hi Vlado,due to the material (slate and quartz) only pouring water and exposure to sun, wind, rain and frost. With this stone, the road to quality surface of the still long.But never mind, time is working for us in this case. The surface quality and a sense of age (jidai) is very important.

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Re: Sugata-ishi

Post  Chris Cochrane on Sun Jan 30, 2011 9:40 pm

Hi Milan... Thanks for sharing Igor's generosity on this thread... :-). I've heard the nicest things about him and admire his breadth of interests in stone appreciation.

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Re: Sugata-ishi

Post  Russell Coker on Sun Jan 30, 2011 11:55 pm

Chris Cochrane wrote:This is a great full-figure stone, Milan. I would encourage you not to refer to it as "a monk in a cloak" for suiseki appreciation. The figure will be recognized by a viewer without naming. If named, it should be referenced as a particular, spiritually elevated figure.

Chris, could you please explain your comments? I'm lost.

R

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Re: Sugata-ishi

Post  Chris Cochrane on Mon Jan 31, 2011 1:26 pm

Hi Russell... In cultivated Japanese-style bonsai & suiseki appreciation, there are limits on the human-figure stones appropriate for display. You are aware that man is seldom featured in these displays-- a limitless resonance/boundlessness suggestive of remote nature is sought that might only have the thin flavor of human presence (e.g., hut or boat stone representative of plain, modest construction & in-keeping with an imagined landscape view). Human figures are rare as subjects in chosen scrolls complementing bonsai or suiseki; when chosen, expect a reason that heightens the scene for a display-- it can be metaphorical or decorative, but perhaps draws away from scenic remoteness.

I think about John Naka's choice of choosing trees to represent his family in the forest planting Goshin "Spirit of the Forest." It was a very particular allusion which is uncommon among Japanese bonsai forest plantings.

Contrary to focus on natural scenes with neither man nor complex construction, traditional Chinese penjing have often been represented with human figurines, explicit man-made constructions, or a miniature tree styled in shape to suggest a story of man's struggle.

Here is the first sentence on figure stones in Matsuura's latest text as translated/adapted by Wil Lautenschlager...
Sugata-ishi are stones with shapes that resemble birds or other animals, religious icons such as the Buddha or bodhisattva Kannon, or in certain cases even manmade objects such as boats, bridges, or small huts.


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Re: Sugata-ishi

Post  Russell Coker on Mon Jan 31, 2011 3:14 pm

Thanks Chris.

I thought that's what you meant, I just hadn't ever gone into it that deeply. I can understand how calling this figural stone "a monk in a cloak" is too defining and restrictive, better to let one's own imagination see what - or who - it sees.

R

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Re: Sugata-ishi

Post  Paul Landis on Wed Feb 16, 2011 4:20 am

Very nice stone and thanks to Chris for his extremely informative replies!!

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