grafted maples

View previous topic View next topic Go down

grafted maples

Post  kingbean on Sun Jan 16, 2011 11:44 am

Hello everyone I have just purchased a grafted arakawa maple about 1-2 yrs old and was just wondering what will happen later on when the trunk Starts to get ruff.
Although the graft is quite low will I have to pot it up to the point of the graft or graft some branches to look like roots where the graft is ?
The root stock is mountain maple and I also have seigen and kashima will they blend in or not ?

kingbean
Member


Back to top Go down

Grafted Maple

Post  bonsaisr on Sun Jan 16, 2011 4:41 pm

I had some experience with 'Arakawa.' What you've got is what you've got. You will always have a graft showing. Being that it's Arakawa, the cognoscenti will excuse you. Take a look at examples on the Web. If you try to bury the graft, you may suffocate the roots & kill the tree. I believe Brent Walston & others are starting to sell Arakawa on their own roots, but they are very slow & very expensive.
Others may have a different view.
Iris

bonsaisr
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: grafted maples

Post  GaryWood on Sun Jan 16, 2011 5:48 pm

KB, Arakawa "root" and "layer" very easy and are vigorous in shoot and root growth. Kashima "root" and "layer" easily but the growth rates, either grafted or on their own roots are slower. It's a genetic dwarf. Seigen reacts just like the species, easy and prolific.
Wood
http://thingsofwood-gary.blogspot.com/

GaryWood
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: grafted maples

Post  kingbean on Sun Jan 16, 2011 5:56 pm

Thanks Iris thanks Gary so what I can do is take cuttings from my arakawa and they will grow well ?

kingbean
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: grafted maples

Post  JimLewis on Sun Jan 16, 2011 6:25 pm

kingbean wrote:Thanks Iris thanks Gary so what I can do is take cuttings from my arakawa and they will grow well ?

The "well" part is 100% up to you.

_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

JimLewis
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: grafted maples

Post  kingbean on Sun Jan 16, 2011 7:13 pm

Ok as long as I look after them they will grow well on there own root stock I mean ?

kingbean
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: grafted maples

Post  GaryWood on Sun Jan 16, 2011 10:53 pm

Yes KB, they will grow well on their own roots.
Wood

GaryWood
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: grafted maples

Post  William N. Valavanis on Mon Jan 17, 2011 4:25 am

Rough bark Japanese maple will live on their own roots, even in the frigid Upstate New York area. Attached are photo of one of my bonsai which I rooted about 35 years ago. It has been completely container grown.

Bill


2002


2008


2010


2010 root base

William N. Valavanis
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: grafted maples

Post  William N. Valavanis on Mon Jan 17, 2011 4:30 am

Attached are photos of a Rough bark Japanese maple which I rooted about 35 years ago and planted in the ground as a shaped garden tree. It's interesting to note that this garden tree is the same age and from the same group of cuttings as the bonsai I posted previously.

If you look closely, you can see the Rough bark Japanese maple bonsai on a post just to the left of the garden tree.

By the way, the garden tree has one of the surface roots which rose to the surface about five feet away displaying the characteristic rough bark.

Bill


Winter


Summer


Autumn



William N. Valavanis
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: grafted maples

Post  kingbean on Mon Jan 17, 2011 5:17 pm

Absoloutley beautiful trees thank you very much for sharing them with me.
Can you tell me why people sell the cultivars grafted on to other rootstock please ?

kingbean
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: grafted maples

Post  GaryWood on Mon Jan 17, 2011 6:15 pm

KB, as in most industry, economics and marketing are the driving forces. In the nursery industry 99.99% of the plants are for landscape use. Cultivars are vegetative clones, never by seed. The economics are to produce a marketable "tree" as fast as possible. Grafting reduces this time by a few years, time is money. There are a few plants that grow better on grafted root stock but the majority grow well on their own roots. Think in industry terms, a bed of a thousand maple seedlings grown each year, value 1-2 $Thousand. With one "Cultivar" tree for scions, grafting increases value by 10 fold. There are a few more reasons but this the driving force.
Wood

GaryWood
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: grafted maples

Post  kingbean on Mon Jan 17, 2011 8:33 pm

Ok I understand now Gary thanks.

kingbean
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: grafted maples

Post  Sponsored content Today at 1:52 pm


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum