Duy Trung stone ( continued)

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  Guest on Sun Apr 10, 2011 1:22 pm

Paul Landis wrote:theintrakeiu---Don't worry so much about what the stone means. If you like it and something made you pick it up that is all that matters. If you enjoy it and you enjoyed collecting it that is what is important. Perhaps its meaning to you will not reveal itself at first but will take time. I have many stones that are not suiseki but I enjoy them and enjoyed collecting them. Some may be suiseki, some may be viewing stones and some may be what we affectionately call here in Pennsylvania "good bench stones"....in other words not a great stone but looks nice on the bonsai benches amoung the trees or elsewhere in the garden.

..yes the stones looks good!
I am not much into stone but I can appreciate good ones if I saw it. Yours is just fine, I love the first stone, seems to be defying gravity.

regards,
jun
Smile

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  thientrakieu on Thu Jul 07, 2011 10:37 am

Hi Everybody.
This is my collection of " Torigata-ishi". I look forward to hearing from your opinions.

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  thientrakieu on Thu Jul 07, 2011 11:06 am


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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  sunip on Thu Jul 07, 2011 1:44 pm

thientrakieu wrote:Hi Everybody.
This is my collection of " Torigata-ishi". I look forward to hearing from your opinions.
Hi Thientrakieu,
Thank you for showing.
This stone gives me an image of the Firebird.
The daiza could be a bit less heavy for my taste.
regards, Sunip Wink

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  thientrakieu on Thu Jul 07, 2011 2:00 pm






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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  thientrakieu on Thu Jul 07, 2011 2:06 pm


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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  thientrakieu on Thu Jul 07, 2011 2:08 pm


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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  thientrakieu on Thu Jul 07, 2011 2:10 pm


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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  dick benbow on Thu Jul 07, 2011 3:18 pm

This has been an enjoyable thread and i appreciate seeing your discoveries in pictures. Of all the stones posted I enjoy seeing the first. By displaying it with the heavy end up, supported by a thin connection with the daiza, a great deal of tension is evolked. i feel strongly this is the correct way to share it with viewers. Very Happy

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  Chris Cochrane on Thu Jul 07, 2011 3:38 pm

Hi Thientrakieu... The stone that Sunip sees a "firebird" looks like a Chinese scholars rock or shangshi in contour, color & material. It is not mounted in Japanese daiza style. It should probably not be classified with the Japanese name torigata-ishi "bird-shape stone."

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  sunip on Sat Jul 09, 2011 10:01 am

Hi Thientrakieu.
This stone gives me the image of a courteous Turkey
thientrakieu wrote:
regards, Sunip Wink

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  sunip on Tue Jul 12, 2011 8:45 pm

Hi Thientrakieu,
[/quote]
Thank you for showing this stone, i looked several times at it,
of cours, the lower part looks like an ear and the upper part like a lion.
But this stone is much about sound.
The stone gives me an image of a mystery animal,
in Europe we call such an animal a griffin.
The hole has a mysterious tension and sound which will transform you any moment.
regards, Sunip Wink

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  thientrakieu on Sun Jul 17, 2011 11:39 am

Hi Sunip, Dick Benbow and Chris Cochrane.
Many thanks for your visit and gave me your comments.
Dear Chris Cochrane.
You write : " The stone that Sunip sees a "firebird" looks like a Chinese scholars rock or shangshi in contour, color & material. It is not mounted in Japanese daiza style. It should probably not be classified with the Japanese name torigata-ishi "bird-shape stone."
I think that a stone which looks like something relatively, it must belong to its classification. Sunip and I think this stone is a bird-shape stone but you say 'no'. Please explain clearly. Thanks a lot.

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  Chris Cochrane on Sun Jul 17, 2011 3:09 pm

Hi Thientrakieu... Glad you are able to post, again. It is fine to call a stone mounted in Vietnamese-style a "bird-shaped stone" on an English language forum. For a Chinese scholars rock, it is fine to name a stone poetically a "firebird" or simply "bird." For a shangshi, you can call a stone a "bird/firebird." In each case the stone would be consistent with other stones of Vietnamese, Chinese scholar rock or shangshi in form, material & mounting.

What do you think torigata-ishi is? It is a worthwhile conversation.

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  thientrakieu on Mon Jul 25, 2011 10:16 am

Chris Cochrane wrote:Hi Thientrakieu... Glad you are able to post, again. It is fine to call a stone mounted in Vietnamese-style a "bird-shaped stone" on an English language forum. For a Chinese scholars rock, it is fine to name a stone poetically a "firebird" or simply "bird." For a shangshi, you can call a stone a "bird/firebird." In each case the stone would be consistent with other stones of Vietnamese, Chinese scholar rock or shangshi in form, material & mounting.

What do you think torigata-ishi is? It is a worthwhile conversation.
Hi Chris Cochrane.
I'm sorry, I'm not good at Japanese. According to the book " Suiseki - The art Art of beautiful stones" of WIILI BENZ. I understand " Torigata- ishi" in Japanese is bird shapes in English. It is used for any stones which represent birds.However, I'm not sure I'm right, please tell me what " Torigata ishi" is?


Last edited by Chris Cochrane on Mon Jul 25, 2011 1:09 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : deleted many blank lines following text for easier navigating)

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  Chris Cochrane on Mon Jul 25, 2011 5:52 pm

Hi Thientrakieu... I prefer to not repeat images but we are discussing a stone posted days ago with many interim images. This is the torigata-ishi which we are discussing...


As we collect stones and consider their mounting, we have options similar to a ball player in choosing what to play or perform in order to engage ourselves and fellow players (or an audience). Will the sports player choose tennis, golf, baseball or another ball game? Will the stone enthusiast choose suiseki, Chinese scholar rock/gongshi, suseok/soosuk, shangshi, viewing stone or another form of stone appreciation? Variety isn't precluded by any stone appreciation expression, but the guidance for each differs.

It would be dysfunctional and defeat the elegance & skill of tennis to play it using a football instead of a tennis ball. Classifying your stone as a "torigata-ishi" is arguably like playing tennis using a football. The elegance of your stone falls outside the guidance of suiseki.

There is no problem using a foreign name/concept for the poetic title of your stone. It can move the owner & viewers to envision shared feeling through metaphor. For example, the title Ho-o (Japanese ホウオウ 'Phoenix') or Sasaki (Japanese 'Red Bird') are suggestive of distinct expression. They fit your stone as representing Japanese feeling, but do not classify the stone as suiseki expression.

Torigata-ishi (bird-shaped stone) is a distinct classification in Japanese stone appreciation. It suggests both recognition of a bird's shape & appreciation consistent with Japanese practice. For Japanese-style figure stones, preference is for dense, weathered to-soft-edge, colorful &/or dark in-color (not off-white), recognizable rather than abstract in contour stones. Attributes of figure stones as distinguished from landscape or abstract stones in Japanese stone appreciation would require an essay unnecessary for the distinction made here.

I hope that helps.


Last edited by Chris Cochrane on Thu Jul 28, 2011 11:44 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  thientrakieu on Thu Jul 28, 2011 9:53 am

Chris Cochrane wrote:Hi Thientrakieu... I prefer to not repeat images but we are discussing a stone posted days ago with many interim images. This is the torigata-ishi which we are discussing...


As we collect stones and consider their mounting, we have options similar to a ball player in choosing what to play or perform in order to engage ourselves and fellow players (or an audience). Will the sports player choose tennis, golf, baseball or another ball game? Will the stone enthusiast choose suiseki, Chinese scholar rock/gongshi, suseok/soosuk, shangshi, viewing stone or another form of stone appreciation? Variety isn't precluded by any stone appreciation expression, but the guidance for each differs.

It would be dysfunctional and defeat the elegance & skill of tennis to play it using a football instead of a tennis ball. Classifying your stone as a torigata-ishi is arguably like playing tennis using a football. The elegance of your stone falls outside the guidance of suiseki.

There is no problem using a foreign name/concept for the poetic title of your stone. It can move the owner & viewers to envision shared feeling through metaphor. For example, the title Ho-o (Japanese ホウオウ 'Phoenix') or Sasaki (Japanese 'Red Bird') are suggestive of distinct expression. They fit your stone as representing Japanese feeling, but do not classify the stone as suiseki expression.

Torigata-ishi (bird-shaped stone) is a distinct classification in Japanese stone appreciation. It suggests both recognition of a bird's shape & appreciation consistent with Japanese practice. For Japanese-style figure stones, preference is for dense, weathered to-soft-edge, colorful &/or dark in-color (not off-white), recognizable rather than abstract in contour stones. Attributes of figure stones as distinguished from landscape or abstract stones in Japanese stone appreciation would require an essay unnecessary for the distinction made here.
I hope that helps.
Hi Chris Cohrane.
Thank you for your clear explanation. I think I understand what you say. My knowledge of Suiseki is very humble. Please forgive me what I bothered you.

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  Chris Cochrane on Thu Jul 28, 2011 5:18 pm

Hi Thientrakieu... You write, "... Please forgive me what I bothered you."
We are learning together about worldwide stone enthusiasm. Your sharing is not bothersome; there is nothing that requires forgiveness; our sharing is respectful. Your stone might be viewed as a torigata-ishi in many stone circles. If the stone is arguably more elegant with another identification, I hope you can consider it.

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What kind is this stone?

Post  thientrakieu on Tue Sep 20, 2011 7:49 am

I don't know what kind this stone is. Please help me.


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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  Guest on Wed Sep 21, 2011 11:25 am

Hi Thientrakieu

I think this stone is a " near mountain " stone.
This stone would look a lot better, if you dye the daisa very dark.... The shape of the daisa is nice, but it could have been smaller.

Kind regards Yvonne

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  thientrakieu on Sat Sep 24, 2011 8:00 am

Yvonne Graubaek wrote:Hi Thientrakieu

I think this stone is a " near mountain " stone.
This stone would look a lot better, if you dye the daisa very dark.... The shape of the daisa is nice, but it could have been smaller.

Kind regards Yvonne
Many thanks for your help. I will make the daiza darker .

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Cut-bottom stone.

Post  thientrakieu on Sat Jan 14, 2012 5:55 am

Is my cut-bottom stone OK ? What do you think of it?
url=https://servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=173&u=15906511][/url]

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

Post  sunip on Sun Jan 15, 2012 8:01 pm

Hello,
Thank you for showing.
A strong rock with a unique difference between the sloped left and the steep right side.
I feel a stronger foot on the daiza under the center focuspoint of the stone, would give more naturalness to the whole.
Regards, Sunip Wink

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Does it look like a turtle ?

Post  thientrakieu on Wed Jul 03, 2013 2:29 pm



url=https://servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=220&u=15906511][/url]

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Re: Duy Trung stone ( continued)

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