Trident question

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Trident question

Post  alonsou on Wed Dec 08, 2010 4:51 am

Can anyone tell me how can I accomplish this:



On this Trident...



and if possible can someone provide some advice on what else should I do to improve trident No1

Thanks

alonso

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Re: Trident question

Post  DreadyKGB on Wed Dec 08, 2010 5:33 am

Alonso,
Bonsai with Japanese Maples by Peter Adams is a great book and also covers trident maples and many techniques for growth and trunk development. This zigzagged trunk on tree #1 is created through trunk chopping. To accomplish this with the second tree I would recommend first planting it into the ground slightly more angled to the right, then chop it back to the lower set of buds. Allow a new leader to grow freely until it has reached sufficient thickness and then chop it back to a lower set of buds or branches then allow another new leader to grow and so on until you are satisfied with the movement and taper. Below is a bit of an illustration(although quite rudimentary).



This process will probably take a few years at the very least. Also I believe both trees could benefit from some time in the ground or at least a large container. Good luck.

Todd

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Re: Trident question

Post  NeilDellinger on Wed Dec 08, 2010 11:05 am

This is correct, although I think Todd's chop recomendation is a bit too high up. It would take two chops to accomplish. The time it will require depends upon several things 1) Growing climate and length of season 2) Soil & feeding. Open soil mix that allows lots of watering & heavy feeding will fatten the new leader up quickly after you chop it.

Personally.....I would airlayer the "ugly" fat little knob off the top. It would make a nice base for a fat little shohin trident maple clump, raft or summo style.

Neil

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Re: Trident question

Post  alonsou on Wed Dec 08, 2010 1:11 pm

Can I do the airlayer any time during the year ? How about the chop?, is there an specific season/time to do it?

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Re: Trident question

Post  JimLewis on Wed Dec 08, 2010 1:19 pm

You could chop now, but then, of course, you couldn't air layer -- which should be done in the spring (another thread on here to the contrary notwithstanding). So, air layer this spring, and use that as the chop site when you finally remove the layer (or chop farther down the trunk after seperation).

Perhaps on that second tree there is another viewpoint that might lead to a better shape?

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: Trident question

Post  my nellie on Wed Dec 08, 2010 1:42 pm

JimLewis wrote:You could chop now, but then, of course, you couldn't air layer -- which should be done in the spring ... ... ...
How about to treat the stump like a hard wood cutting?
Is this feasible?

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Re: Trident question

Post  JimLewis on Wed Dec 08, 2010 8:50 pm

Yes. But not at this time of year. Hardwood cuttings on tridents are best done after leaves have unfolded.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: Trident question

Post  NeilDellinger on Thu Dec 09, 2010 1:04 am

Airlayer in spring as Jim suggests, then chop lower at the time you separate the layer. This would be sometime in June. Good time to Chop without risk of die back.

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Re: Trident question

Post  alonsou on Thu Dec 09, 2010 1:13 am

How long does it take the airlayer process?.. I've seen some videos of how its done but never try it before, just want to make sure what I'm doing.

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Re: Trident question

Post  JimLewis on Thu Dec 09, 2010 3:32 am

Generally speaking, Tridents are easy layers (not talking chickens here!) but there's no way of saying how long it will take for a layer to reach the point where you separate it from the parent tree. I tend to wait longer than many others since I insist that the plastic wrap or pot (depending on method) be FILLED with roots. Others make the cut almost as soon as they see a few roots through the plastic.

But temperature, moisture, sunlight and a host of other physical conditions also will play a role. And then, some individual trees tend to drag their feet.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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