Clerodendrum inerme

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Clerodendrum inerme

Post  Markus on Tue Dec 07, 2010 1:25 am

Four years old from a cutting, these plants are easy and fast to grow, though I find I need to root prune twice a year.

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Clerodendrum inerme

Post  Guest on Tue Dec 07, 2010 1:50 am

Well done Marcus and welcome. I know nothing of this species but your cutting is full of character and looks to have a good future.

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  jrodriguez on Tue Dec 07, 2010 2:02 pm

Markus,

Clerodendron Inerme is a great species for bonsai. Ours grow close to the sea, and are constantly beaten by the wind and salt water. We often emulate this character when styling our trees. In China it is known as Ku Lan Pan.

Below, one of my trees, in training:




Kind regards,

Jose Luis

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  Markus on Tue Dec 07, 2010 7:18 pm

Jose, I think your tree shows clearly what it is that makes these plants such good material. The Bark shows signs of texture and age even on youngsters. The compound leaves reduce in size easily and they're all too willing to back bud madly should the need for hard pruning arise.
I love 'em.

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  JimLewis on Tue Dec 07, 2010 7:21 pm

Is it related to Podocarpus? Leaves and bark are VERY similar.

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  jrodriguez on Tue Dec 07, 2010 7:39 pm

Jim,

No, this tree is unrelated to podocarpus. It is in the Lamiaceae family, a genus in that includes premna and Gmelina.

This tree has various leaf types, which reduce dramatically with pruning. Like Markus states, this tree requires root pruning at least twice a year. If not done, it might suffer from excesive fine twig die-back.

Kind regards,

Jose Luis


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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  Peter Woosley on Wed Dec 08, 2010 8:02 am

The Clarodendrum is fast becoming a popular choice for bonsai enthusiasts here in Australia as well. (In Queensland anyway) My friends and i have a great source for collecting them here, they grow in a large clump/thicket if you like. They have amazingly textured bark and grow in such a contorted manner, making them great for use in bonsai.







This is a little cascade that i swapped a mate for with a Olive. It was originally an informal upright tree, the main trunk was cut off to create the cascade tree.



Hope you dont mind me posting these in your thread Markus, they are such a great specie for us.

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  jrodriguez on Wed Dec 08, 2010 12:46 pm

Markus,

I guees you opened Pandora's box!!!!

Kind Regards,

Jose Luis

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  Markus on Wed Dec 08, 2010 7:44 pm

Peter, I hadn't realised that they were growing wild here. Looks like you have a lifetime of yamadori there.

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  Peter Woosley on Wed Dec 08, 2010 8:56 pm

Yes Marcus they are growing here, not quite so wide spread in your area (didn't realize you were in Brisbane) but further north to you they are quite common to be seen growing in these clumps. I am on the Sunshine coast and have seen them here from time to time. The ones in the picture above are growing further north from me. Interestingly, they grow well from cuttings as well, BIG cuttings!

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  Markus on Wed Dec 08, 2010 9:58 pm

Well there you go (as Mark starts up Google Earth and begans scanning the Sunshine Coast).
I have also had success with larger cuttings, they'll even strike roots in water. Given their rampant behavior, I wonder if they have the potential to become feral, like the many Camphor Laurels we see around Brisbane these days?

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  hiram on Wed Dec 08, 2010 10:42 pm

Jose what is the difference between the clerodendrum aculetum and this species? I would really appreciate it if you can clarify for me. I have several and i would like to know which I have. Mine came from Puerto Rico.

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  Pola on Thu Dec 09, 2010 2:16 am

Looks like a great species to work with. Those are nice examples.

Jose,
What is this called here in the island? Looks like some type of Escambron...

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  Peter Woosley on Thu Dec 09, 2010 7:31 am

Markus wrote: I wonder if they have the potential to become feral, like the many Camphor Laurels we see around Brisbane these days?

The short answer is yes Marcus, but they don't get so big, they just grow out instead of up. In that clump i posted above, there would likely be 50 or more individual clumps of them.

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  shannon on Thu Dec 09, 2010 9:23 am

Markus, As Pete suggests its a fantastic species to work with and very forgiving.
I would add some pictures of the large clero I have collected but am finding it difficult to up load.... Help

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  jrodriguez on Thu Dec 09, 2010 12:12 pm

Hiram,

Clerodendron aculeata has a rounder leaf. Clerodendron Inerme has a pointed leaf and a thicker lamina.

Pola,

In order to avoid confusion, I often detract from using regional names. In this case, yes, this is what is often reffered to as 'escambrón' in Puerto Rico, a name also used for Haematoxylon campechianum and Pithecellobium dulce.

Kind regards,

Jose Luis

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  hiram on Thu Dec 09, 2010 4:13 pm

Thank you jose. I am in love with this species. Beware if you place it in shohin or bunjin pot, will have to depot it atleast three to four times a year. This year here florida was very hot and they went balistic. Very humble species. A must for any Bonsai artist. Jose if you know anybody selling, let me know. My email is hiram@olicatabonsai.com. thanks again.

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  hiram on Sat Dec 11, 2010 11:09 pm

Joselito this Carlos, trata a Hiram como un hermano. Remember he is a Macias.

Tu Pai

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

Post  Pola on Sun Dec 12, 2010 3:58 pm

So it is escambron? Thanks Jose. Still learning,didn't know their were other varieties. I have a few cuttings,not sure which one I have now...

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Re: Clerodendrum inerme

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