Elm Yamadori Root Question

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Elm Yamadori Root Question

Post  Ryan on Tue Nov 30, 2010 9:23 pm

Hey everyone,

I dug up this elm today that was growing in a bad spot in my yard. I managed to get many roots, but they are all mostly large. One of them, however, is too large to fit into a pot. It splits off into 3 smaller roots at the end as well. The root is very thick and long. I was wondering if it was at all possible to cut that large root and just leave the others? The root can be seen in the following pictures:

Upper right hand corner of picture:


Lowest root coming towards the camera:


Or should I leave it and just find a very large pot? I currently have the roots soaking in a tub of water to keep them fresh and wet. Suggestions?

Ryan
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Elm Yamadori Root Question

Post  Guest on Tue Nov 30, 2010 10:26 pm

Hello Ryan. I have collected many Elms from the countryside and they survive with very little root. I think you are safe to shorten the large root by half before potting up. All the others want serious reduction too but leave that until next Spring and you will be amazed how much root you have.

Guest
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Re: Elm Yamadori Root Question

Post  Ryan on Tue Nov 30, 2010 10:38 pm

will baddeley wrote:Hello Ryan. I have collected many Elms from the countryside and they survive with very little root. I think you are safe to shorten the large root by half before potting up. All the others want serious reduction too but leave that until next Spring and you will be amazed how much root you have.

Thanks Will!

I will remove the root by half tomorrow. Right now I will just leave the roots to soak. I was just afraid as the only major roots on this tree are the bigger, thick ones. Not so sure what kind of elm it is though. I've been told it is a Siberian and I've also been told Slippery. I haven't a clue but here is the bark:




When I saw the roots I immediately thought root over rock, but that's just me.

Ryan
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Re: Elm Yamadori Root Question

Post  Todd Ellis on Wed Dec 01, 2010 1:44 am

Ryan, do you have a rock you could tie the roots to? Or something to form the roots around to start the downward angles for root over rock? Cutting the long root in half could reduce your options (takes longer to grow the needed roots) for a root over rock. Or consider planting the tree with some of the roots exposed and winding the longer roots around the growing container. Cover the tree, container, and exposed roots with mulch. Then, in the Spring you can repot. Many of your finer feeding roots are at the ends of the long roots anyway. Keep the tree protected; out of the wind. It should survive the VA Winter okay.
Best,
Todd

Todd Ellis
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Re: Elm Yamadori Root Question

Post  Ryan on Wed Dec 01, 2010 3:08 am

Todd Ellis wrote:Ryan, do you have a rock you could tie the roots to? Or something to form the roots around to start the downward angles for root over rock? Cutting the long root in half could reduce your options (takes longer to grow the needed roots) for a root over rock. Or consider planting the tree with some of the roots exposed and winding the longer roots around the growing container. Cover the tree, container, and exposed roots with mulch. Then, in the Spring you can repot. Many of your finer feeding roots are at the ends of the long roots anyway. Keep the tree protected; out of the wind. It should survive the VA Winter okay.
Best,
Todd

Thanks Todd I do! Would any rock be fine or would it have to be the rock I am going to use for root over rock? Or am I just training the roots downward for now? And would I just be tying the roots to the rock with say, rope? Or would it be the whole ROR technique with the wrap, etc? Thanks!

Ryan
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Re: Elm Yamadori Root Question

Post  Todd Ellis on Wed Dec 01, 2010 4:11 am

That's a good question.
Honestly, the safest place for the tree, to over-Winter, is in the ground. If the ground is not an option for you, use the largest container you have that the tree will fit in. Spring is the best time to do major root work, because it has the rest of the growing season to recooperate. I have wedged roots around large stones, and in some case no stones, in nursery containers, with minimal stretching and bending of the bark, and the trees survived and grew fine. The real tying-of-the-roots, to the stone, with rope or covered wires should wait until Spring when the tree is in its active growing phase. If these "injuries" happen now, they will go through Winter without healing; which, theoretically, would allow bacteria and other "unwanteds" into the wounds. This is because there will be major manipulation of the roots with splits and tears in the bark, to get the roots as close as possible to the stone. These "injuries" will start to heal instantly in the Spring. This is also why major wiring on deciduous species is carried out in the Spring time, sosthe rips and tears in the bark can start to heal right away.

I am certainly not an expert and still learning how to be successful with growing my trees. The photo shows a beech which I collected this last Late Winter/ Early Spring. Do you see how I forced some roots into the container. It looks contrived, but I plan to correct this, next Spring.
This is a large tree; the root spread is roughly 24inches wide, the trunk is approx 5 inches in diameter. When I collect deciduous trees in the Fall, I put them in the ground. Mother Earth is the best insulator.
Have fun and if the tree starts growing next Spring, celebrate. If it doesn't make it, there are many more elms to find! Very Happy
Salut, Todd

Todd Ellis
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Re: Elm Yamadori Root Question

Post  Ryan on Thu Dec 02, 2010 8:15 pm

Wow thanks Todd, great tree!

I ended up just planting this into a container with turface and some bark mixed in. We'll see what happens in the spring!




Ryan
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Re: Elm Yamadori Root Question

Post  Todd Ellis on Fri Dec 03, 2010 2:43 am

Now you can spend Winter-time looking for a nice stone for your tree! Smile

Todd Ellis
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Re: Elm Yamadori Root Question

Post  Ryan on Fri Dec 03, 2010 3:37 am

Todd Ellis wrote:Now you can spend Winter-time looking for a nice stone for your tree! Smile

Very true, if it survives Rolling Eyes

Ryan
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