Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

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Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

Post  HuuHiep on Sat Nov 27, 2010 3:29 am

Hello Alls
Long time no see you. Today, I would like to share with you my suiseki. I look foward to hearing from you. Thanks for your attention.
Pic 1

Pic 2

Pic 3

HuuHiep
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Re: Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

Post  ogie on Sat Nov 27, 2010 6:01 am

Hello Huuhiep,
Thanks for sharing,i like your first and last stone,but all are good,great texture and color. keep on posting

Regards,
Alex


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Re: Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

Post  mathias on Sat Nov 27, 2010 12:58 pm

Hello,
I like your stones, especialy the 1 and the 3. The third is really great but the daiza is not correct for me. It's big like a suiban, but it's not a suiban. The daiza must have the same surface that the top of the stone.... It's my point of view....
Bye
Marhias

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Re: Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

Post  peterbrod on Sat Nov 27, 2010 6:51 pm

mathias ThumbsUp

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Re: Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

Post  HuuHiep on Mon Nov 29, 2010 12:40 am

ogie wrote:Hello Huuhiep,
Thanks for sharing,i like your first and last stone,but all are good,great texture and color. keep on posting

Regards,
Alex


Hello Mr. Alex (Ogie)
Thank so much for your encouraging me. I 'll keep on posting.

Regards,
Huuhiep


Last edited by HuuHiep on Mon Nov 29, 2010 1:15 am; edited 2 times in total

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Re: Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

Post  HuuHiep on Mon Nov 29, 2010 12:59 am

mathias wrote:Hello,
I like your stones, especialy the 1 and the 3. The third is really great but the daiza is not correct for me. It's big like a suiban, but it's not a suiban. The daiza must have the same surface that the top of the stone.... It's my point of view....
Bye
Marhias

Hello Mr. Mathias

Thanks so much Mathias. You 're quite right. The third must be put in Suiban is the best. I did a wooden suiban instead of tradition one to keep the stone balancing because the stone fell when I put it in a traditional one. Oh! I forgot to fill sand in the suiban. I always need more your feedback on my work.

Regard,
HuuHiep


Last edited by HuuHiep on Mon Nov 29, 2010 1:16 am; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

Post  HuuHiep on Mon Nov 29, 2010 1:11 am

peterbrod wrote:mathias ThumbsUp

Dear Mr. Peterbrod
Thanks so much for your darwing, It impressed me. If I use a Daiza for it I 'll do as your advice. But If I have an idea as I shared with Mathias so how do you think? It 's good or not. Pls give me a lot of advice.
Regard,
HuuHiep

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Re: Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

Post  Chris Cochrane on Mon Nov 29, 2010 5:14 pm

Hi HuuHiep... I'm not familiar with Vietnamese stone display choices except as I've seen them on IBC, the internet and in a few books. You have wide latitude.

For the third stone, your original "wood suiban with socket" is a good & creative idea which both supports the stone & its image as a vast landscape. There are subtle considerations that could offer enhancement, & they are choices you have likely already considered.

The last stone is of uncommon contour that recalls scenery. For you, I imagine it recalls a Bodhisattva sitting on a high rock overlooking a stream. That is an iconic image. A sitting Bodhisattva in suiseki are probably most often associated with cave stones-- either cradled inside or sitting just outside the entrance. For your view with the figure, I would keep the stone on a daiza (or seat, if not in Japanese style) which does not exceed the stone's footprint. With the Bodhisattva figure, the stone's image is of a circumscribed scene of limited space & a suiban's metaphor of boundless space disturbs the intimacy of the landscape, but the suiban/tray increases the spiritual resonance[/i]. Viewers should be open to your intention as host. Did I receive the stone as you intended?

An alternative view for this stone is imagining a boundless landscape where a hanging plateau overreaches a vast plain or sea. The plateau ends near its overhanging edge with a substantive, flat-top mountain seen at great distance. No single figure would be visible at that distance. In this case a suiban would be fine if filled near-full with sand, but its dimension should be exceptionally wide to not limit the scene with its rim. I might consider a "board with no rim" to a "rimmed, wooden suiban" if displaying a socketed wood base of tray size underneath the stone. I admire the skill of someone capable of a close fitting socket with no rim & a very convincing suiban profile-- the carver is extremely skilled.

Another alternative for display of the hanging plateau would be a simple daiza under the stone's narrow base. I do not think a daiza should extend under a stone's overhang, but you'll see I suggest a much reduced modification of just that in the illustration below. Some enthusiasts craft daiza under a stone overhang to suggest a shelter stone, but arguably (& under widely held guidance), a shelter stone (a somewhat close view where a figure is perceived as fitting invisibly within the visible scene) should have its own floor.

The wizardry of placing a daiza under the small foot of this stone which would not topple is a difficult problem. You have to look beyond guidance for what attracts or detracts... and I'd recommend an honest, visible resolution instead of a hidden jury-rigged balance. If you have noted the reduced sizing of well-crafted Japanese daiza connecting the overhang above arching suiseki, you would have a good model for something I cannot easily draw.

PLEASE pay attention to which top surfaces are most important to be displayed horizontally. Your wooden suiban with a socket for the stone is a good solution as it is, but the stone hangs slightly low at its left-end overhang. It is best (IMO) to not measure it but to place it approximately level by your eye.

Here is my poor & rough cartoon of the stone rotated to a more horizontal position for the top-step & largest area of the send step...

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Re: Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

Post  peterbrod on Mon Nov 29, 2010 6:36 pm

to my knowledge,is the wood as a material for suiban inadmissible

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Re: Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

Post  Chris Cochrane on Mon Nov 29, 2010 10:25 pm

Hi Peterbrod... Your statement was oddly worded in English:
to my knowledge,is the wood as a material for suiban inadmissible
I would guess you meant, "To my knowledge, wood as a material for suiban is inadmissible."

I mostly agree with you in regard to present practice, though exceptions are evident both historically & artistically. People who use trays for displaying stones can only use what is available & choose many models. In a USA Japanese internment camp in World War II, there were wooden "suiban" (the Japanese owner's intention) for display of stones-- Jim Greaves has written about their use & his displays include an original example from the internment camp. A copy would be just as valid though less historic. Wood platforms/trays/pots were used in Japan in the early 14th century to display stones partially buried in sand as well as miniature plantings-- e.g., illustration in the Kasuga Gonken handscroll. In the late 16th century, stones known a bonseki (literally "tray + stone") or bonzan (literally "tray + mountain") were displayed in lacquered wood trays. The famous historic stone Mikasayama ("Layered Mountain," I think) is always shown in a lacquered, wood tray. Indonesian exhibits include stones in plastic trays that are designed to look like bronze doban & function as any other tray.

Modern display practice mostly follows Japanese tea display practiced by literati & their followers from residential or sencha banqueting halls as widely practiced (though begun by literati) in the 19th century in addition to practices interpreted by enthusiasts during the 1960s & 1970s suiseki publishing boom. They generally include a footed table, board or mat under a footed daiza (wood seat) or suiban ("water tray" of either ceramic or bronze). Neither a wood board nor a wood suiban is commonly seen in the latest Japanese exhibits, but in the early to 'mid 1960s, a socketed or plain board was commonly seen in exhibits with no further support. Wide allowance is seen in the well-known text Denshoseki (1988) by Teisuke Takahashi, which displays old and modern famous stones privileged by Japanese Aiseki Kai choice & naming.



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Re: Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

Post  peterbrod on Tue Nov 30, 2010 11:36 pm

suiban used in summer for a good stone for the induction of feeling colt,sand mimics the water,or suiban filled with water,wood is not suitable(mi englisch pig study Sad )

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Re: Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

Post  Chris Cochrane on Wed Dec 01, 2010 3:27 pm

Hi Peter... I once thought suiban were only used in warm seasons for cooling feeling, but that is not what Japanese experts in display emphasize. A suiban more importantly suggests open space where the imagination is free to wander with less formality than viewing a stone in a daiza. The open space can equally represent land or water as its surface. The surface imagined is less important than the open space, whether or not the open space is substantial.

In exhibits or alcove display, only a stone in a tray should be accompanied by a "complementary plant" shita. That is not because the tray scene represents water but because the informality of tray display is more consistent with an informal planting-- each being more natural & arguably less constructed in feeling when done well.

I agree that stones associated with water for its cooling effect are the best choice for suiban-- water-pool stones, coastal rocks, island stones (especially, island stones with steep sides &/or coves), headlands facing water (or a plain), archways-in-water and others. I can see the jump from that preference to assuming the tray represents water as easily taken. Uhaku Sudo & Seiji Morimae have emphasized NOT making that leap, however, in presentations at repeated International Stone Appreciation Symposia (Pennsylvania USA). Both refer to tray display in regard to the spirit (perhaps overlapping our notion of "feeling") of a boundless universe. In his latest book An Introduction to Suiseki, Arishige Matsuura notes, "Seasonally speaking, the only restriction is that suiban not be used in winter, as the scenes they present often have a cooling, refreshing effect better suited for warmer seasons." (p.67).

In both autumn Keido lessons (outside Tokyo) & in the late November Chosekikai exhibit (Kyoto), stones in suiban were among the most prominent displays of suiseki that I recall during a year of study in Japan.


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Re: Pls, write a comment for my suiseki.

Post  HuuHiep on Fri Dec 03, 2010 12:36 pm

Hi Peterbrod and Chris

Thanks so much for your advice and usefull information.

Regard,

HuuHiep
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