Chicken Compost

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Chicken Compost

Post  gax on Wed Oct 20, 2010 8:19 pm

All,

I recently bought a bag of Chicken Compost to fertilize my trees. I understand that the nitrogen content in new waste can burn the roots. I looked at the bag and it doesn't state how old it is.

Do any of you use chicken compost? How do you age it? Do you use it out of the bag, dry it, etc?

Thanks

gax
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Re: Chicken Compost

Post  Kev Bailey on Wed Oct 20, 2010 8:40 pm

Is it dry pellets? If so you can use it on the surface. I scatter some early in the year and again later. I have done for many years and know several others who do also, with good results. If it is fresh stuff it does need aging and careful application at the right time of year.

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Re: Chicken Compost

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Wed Oct 20, 2010 10:02 pm

If it says compost and not manure it is probably safe, but it still might smell and attract critters. I used pelletized Chicken Compost from time to time with good success. You might not want to use it indoors or on trees that you bring in.

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Re: Chicken Compost

Post  ogie on Wed Oct 20, 2010 11:10 pm

Hu gax,
If it's process i w still will go for leeser dosage as recommended.chicken manure is a BIT HOT,but if still fresh dry it up,you wount go wrong for less potent and observe the after effect,
regards.
Alex/ogie

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Re: Chicken Compost

Post  JimLewis on Wed Oct 20, 2010 11:20 pm

You seem to be in the USA. If the bag says "compost" it will have been well cured and should not burn trees or smell.

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Thank you

Post  gax on Thu Oct 21, 2010 3:19 am

Thanks everyone for the replies.

It doesn't stink to me (although I am developing a cold).
It's dark and looks like wet mulch/soil mixture.

I think that I might experiment with it on a tree or two...



gax
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Re: Chicken Compost

Post  ronnyadam on Tue Oct 26, 2010 3:20 am

Go into the garden of composted manure to give it a high dose of nutrients and energy can turn even the poorest countries in the fertile soil. chicken manure has the highest concentration of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in animals and is therefore a powerful garden fertilizer.

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Re: Chicken Compost

Post  JimLewis on Tue Oct 26, 2010 12:26 pm

chicken manure has the highest concentration of nitrogen, phosphorusand potassium in animals and is therefore a powerful garden fertilizer.

Weeeelllll . . . Maybe fresh, but you can't put fresh chicken (or any) manure on you trees (or a planted garden). After it has aged, chicken manure is about as "strong" in NPK as any other manure.

Chicken - 1.1 - 0.5 - 0.5
Cow - 0.6 - 0.2 - 0.5
Duck - 0.6 - 1.4 - -0.5
Horse - 0.7 - 0.3 - 0.6 (plus weeds because horses don't digest many seeds well)
Pig - 0.5 - 0.3 - 0.5
Rabbit - 2.4 - 1.4 - 0.6
Sheep - 0.7 - 0.3 - 0.9
Steer - 0.7 - 0.3 - 0.4

Dunno why steer and cow would be different (tho not by much), but in this compendium (from the Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening) rabbit is the clear winner.

HOWEVER, rather than putting up with the long-term storage problem with manures (including insects, mold and odor), I'd prefer packaged fertilizers that are scientifically balanced.

A manure tea, on the other hand, can be useful with any of these, tho that dilutes the NPK even further. It may be most useful for new transplants or seedlings.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: Chicken Compost

Post  ogie on Tue Oct 26, 2010 12:48 pm

Thanks Jim....Always educated by just reading you guys replying,now i know what to choose....
Regards,
Alex/Ogie

ogie
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Re: Chicken Compost

Post  Guest on Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:03 pm

I use dried manure straight from my hen house on some species but not others. Anything that loves lots of food (ficus etc) wont complain as long as you remember it is alot stronger than the processed stuff and adjust your application rates accordingly. It also seems to break down a bit quicker than the pelletized so you can apply it more often.

I do not use it on any coniferous or aust native plants, but most deciduous and tropicals thrive with it. Its a matter of experimenting, so dont try it on something you would be upset about hurting until you have tested it on a starter of the same species.

Matt

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Re: Chicken Compost

Post  gax on Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:44 pm

Thank you everyone for the replies.

What I have isn't just manure, it's got a little bark in it too, so I assume that it's just compost with chicken waste in it. It looks like dark soil and doesn't really smell.

I put a little on petunas that I have and experimented with how much I gave them. Two barrels were fine, a third (which got the most) did get a little scorched.

I think that I will put a little on the trees to see how they respond, I'll just be conservative with how much.

Thanks again for the replies

gax
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