COTONEASTER MICROPHYLLUS PROBLEM

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COTONEASTER MICROPHYLLUS PROBLEM

Post  my nellie on Fri Oct 15, 2010 7:52 pm

I aquired a shohin cotoneaster microphyllus about a month ago.
Two weeks ago I had trimmed some twiggs just to form some negative space among the branches.
I also had changed the plastic training pot with a ceramic one in the same dimensions. I did not disturbed the roots.
Substrate that filled the empty space around the rootball is akadama + crushed pumice.
This evening when checking some brown leaves I realized that healthy looking green leaves are falling off. Some of the leaves have turned a deep brown colour and they fall off too. Even when I blow on the leaves they are falling down. The falling leaves look absolutely healthy, though! Some new shoots are emerging on the branches.

Does anyone have an idea, please? Is this some kind of disease?
The plant is going to be completely defoliated Shocked
Thank you in advance.

my nellie
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Re: COTONEASTER MICROPHYLLUS PROBLEM

Post  JimLewis on Fri Oct 15, 2010 7:59 pm

It sounds like your problem is related to the transplant. Are you certain that when you put the tree into its new pot and added the acadama/pumice mixture that you left no air pockets under the rootball or around the edges? That is a distinct possibility if the new pot was a different shape than the old one.

Use your fingers and press down on the soil around the plant (after you have watered it in well). Really pack the soil in around the tree.

These are very tough, resilient plants. Chances are it is just complaining and will adapt -- especially since I suspect you have a few weeks to go before cold weather sets in in Athens.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: COTONEASTER MICROPHYLLUS PROBLEM

Post  my nellie on Fri Oct 15, 2010 8:39 pm

Thanks for your response, Jim!
I can say I did took good care not to leave air pockets using a chopstic....
Nevertheless, I will check again and press the soil firmly down.
As far as the weather is concerned, yes you are right we still have temperatures fluctuating from 8 to 26 with some rainfalls throughout the country. So there is still good weather for this little creature cotoneaster of mine Very Happy
I hope that your experience proves right!
Thank you again!

my nellie
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Re: COTONEASTER MICROPHYLLUS PROBLEM

Post  Ron van Ravenhorst on Mon Oct 18, 2010 11:06 pm

Never use chopsticks while repotting. You can't feel wat you are doiing with chopsticks. When poking with chopsticks you can easily damage your trees fine roots.
It is better to use your fingers.
When you fill the pot with the new substrate use little bits at the time so fou can see what happens while proccesing and filling the pot.

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Re: COTONEASTER MICROPHYLLUS PROBLEM

Post  my nellie on Tue Oct 19, 2010 2:39 pm

Thank you very much, Ron!
Very kind of you to share your experience!

my nellie
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Re: COTONEASTER MICROPHYLLUS PROBLEM

Post  JimLewis on Tue Oct 19, 2010 5:34 pm

Goodness. I've been using chopsticks for 40 years and have never skewered a root. My fingers, on the other hand, are big blunt objects and do not get between the roots where you need to be certain the soil goes. I think I'll stick with chopsticks -- the universal bonsai tool. Hope you don't mind.

I'm not sure what chopsticks you use, but mine have pointed ends and couldn't damage a root if I tried.

A courtesy hint: Never say never.

_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: COTONEASTER MICROPHYLLUS PROBLEM

Post  Guest on Thu Oct 21, 2010 4:21 am

I too have used chopsticks for about 13 years and have noticed no damage to roots in that time. I tend to push the chopstick right into the soil and then roll it in a circular motion to get the dry bonsai mix in amongst the roots.

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Re: COTONEASTER MICROPHYLLUS PROBLEM

Post  Ron van Ravenhorst on Fri Oct 22, 2010 8:24 am

will baddeley wrote:I too have used chopsticks for about 13 years and have noticed no damage to roots in that time. I tend to push the chopstick right into the soil and then roll it in a circular motion to get the dry bonsai mix in amongst the roots.

This is the same how I did it for years. I used repot sticks and chopsticks too. Untill I was corrected by one of the best masters in Europe. He told me to use my fingers, with your fingers you have better feeling and control on fine roots.
And I must say that, after a couple of repottings, he has a point.
Now I use the sticks to comb the rootbal and my fingers for filling the pot with substrates.

But I have to say there is a great difference on how bonsaiist do take care of the roots while repotting. A lot of them don't comb roots like I do now after learning. Nowadays I comb, prune and spread roots like building up the crown of a tree. So I have fully control on how they must grow. Direction, thicknes and taper are some of the aspects you can control in this manner.

The lessons I learned about repotting trees opened my eyes and corrected many things I did out of expirience.
I don't say it is the only right way to do it, and I respect the way other bonsaiist repot there trees.
It is just my two cents. Embarassed

Ron van Ravenhorst
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Re: COTONEASTER MICROPHYLLUS PROBLEM

Post  my nellie on Fri Oct 22, 2010 12:23 pm

I believe this is good to share one's experience!
Ron van Ravenhorst wrote: ... ... ... But I have to say there is a great difference on how bonsaiist do take care of the roots while repotting. A lot of them don't comb roots like I do now after learning. Nowadays I comb, prune and spread roots like building up the crown of a tree. So I have fully control on how they must grow. Direction, thicknes and taper are some of the aspects you can control in this manner.
... ... ...
I think the above is very similar to this one which I have read recently here http://ibonsaiclub.forumotion.com/bonsai-f1/tropical-bonsai-plants-t968-60.htm
craigw wrote: ... ... ... In order for a bonsai to develop really good ramification in the crown it also needs good root ramification, the root system and the top of the tree are really a mirror of each other. ... ... ...
Do you think so?

my nellie
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Re: COTONEASTER MICROPHYLLUS PROBLEM

Post  JimLewis on Fri Oct 22, 2010 1:12 pm

<blockquote>craigw wrote: ... ... ... In order for abonsai to develop really good ramification in the crown it also needsgood root ramification, the root system and the top of the tree arereally a mirror of each other. ... ... ...
</blockquote>
Do you think so?

No. Otherwise we'd all have awfully deep pots.

This is another of those concepts that just won't go away.

Obviously you need healthy roots to have a healthy tree. But the idea that there's a "mirror" (even in an apocryphal sense) as if there were one root for one branch is nonsense.

For some trees -- azalea, for one -- combing out the roots could be damaging. And, of course, combing the roots means you have to bare root your trees at repotting time. That's not always needful or safe, depending on the tree.

_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: COTONEASTER MICROPHYLLUS PROBLEM

Post  my nellie on Fri Oct 22, 2010 2:21 pm

It's always depending on the tree species.
Now the above post reminds me of the underneath excerpt from an article on Thuja-Arborvitae :
One physiological feature of the plant is worth noting. Each hydraulic pathway, cambial lifeline, or xylem and phloem conduit system, is sectored-completely divided from the rest of the plant. From a practical viewpoint, this means that each major root supplies one side of the tree or one major branch. If the root or branch is killed, that entire portion of the plant will die. This phenomenon is seen in other trees, but is strikingly dramatic with white cedars. For this reason, collected white cedars should be allowed to establish in a growing pot for at least two growing seasons prior to styling. Otherwise, you risk building a design around a branch that is condemned to wither due to lack of a lifeline.
which you can find and read here : http://absbonsai.org/bonsai-articles/bonsai-features/63-eastern-white-cedar-pinching-technique

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Re: COTONEASTER MICROPHYLLUS PROBLEM

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