MOUNTAINS and LAKES .

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MOUNTAINS and LAKES .

Post  trantanhung_nt on Mon Oct 11, 2010 11:15 am

Hello ,
Continue to send to you the landscape stone . They describe the mountains and lakes following :
_ MOUNTAIN

_ LAKE

Please look and feel
Thank you
HUNG - TRAN .

trantanhung_nt
Member


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Re: MOUNTAINS and LAKES .

Post  trantanhung_nt on Wed Oct 13, 2010 3:46 pm

Hi Friends ,
Continue to send to you the NEW MOUNTAIN and LAKE following :
_ MOUNTAIN and LAKE ( Black Basalt - Khánh Vĩnh River , Weight 1000 Gr )
Thank you .


trantanhung_nt
Member


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Re: MOUNTAINS and LAKES .

Post  ogie on Tue Oct 19, 2010 12:54 pm

hello Hung Tran,
thanks for sharing...nice stone
regards,
alex/ogie Smile

ogie
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Re: MOUNTAINS and LAKES .

Post  Chris Cochrane on Mon Oct 25, 2010 7:06 pm

Hi Hung Tran... The form of the third stone is fascinating. With the lake surrounded my a distant mountain (or mountain range) in the background as well as a mildly arching massive rock in the foreground, it offers many views. One of the strongest landscape views is as a plateau stone. Though I've been taught in suiseki practice to always consider the water pool as most important in determining the directional flow of a stone with a water pool (or lake), I think every landscape imagined in a water pool stone is worth admiring. Without the small pagoda figurine to limit the scene's size, I think it could be improved as a landscape view suiseki.

For myself, I'd prefer this stone in a daiza. Then, without a label limiting its form as mountain lake, plateau, or massive rock. The viewer would be left to consider it as a landscape stone or as a figure stone with an animal (real or mythic) turning to look over its back (the plateau). If such a stone is poeticly named, I'd try to offer the widest interpretation of form possible.

In early Chinese scholar rock interpretation, scholars saw stones which looked like animals as miniatures of landscapes in the form of an animal. Thus, the scholar could manipulate the qi/chi "spirit breath/energy" of a landscape scale mountain in a stone that resembled an animal. A stone which looked like a tiger might be considered a "Mountain in Tiger form" or or a stone which looked like a dragon might be considered a "Massive Landscape Rock in the form of a Dragon."

In a daiza with no water in its cavity and no figurine, you might poetically call this stone "Goat Mountain" or "Beast Mountain." "Beast Mountain" is less definitive and, therefore, allows the imagination more creativity in seeing both landscape & animal form. If you need the word "Goat" or other distinct animal to clarify an indistinct image, that is a fine poetic title, too.

Envisioning animal & landscape forms simultaneously is not typical of modern suiseki expression, but it can make viewing stones more interesting imaginatively. That early Chinese scholars' rock enthusiasts embraced this combination in feeling energy from stones increases its resonance. Since early, "feudal lord"/daimyo-circle suiseki enthusiasts & later (late 18th - early 20th century. Japanese literati & their circles) suiseki enthusiasts often treasured Chinese aesthetics including Daoism over native Japanese expression, embracing Chinese expression for suiseki forms has not always been a barrier. Today, this combination is arguably viewing stone expression rather than suiseki expression.

I hope the stone is large enough and naturally flat-enough to warrant crafting a daiza-style seating & suiseki-style display, which respects the tradition of this stone's form. It would be a welcomed addition to a suiseki exhibit or a viewing stone exhibit. It does not look like a Chinese scholar's rock. High-end dealers of antique (mostly 18th or 19th century Japanese "suiseki") now often refer to them as "(Japanese) scholar stones." Often, they are as close to Chinese as to modern Japanese taste.

_________________
... visit the U.S. National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, Washington DC USA-- http://www.bonsai-nbf.com

Chris Cochrane
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Re: MOUNTAINS and LAKES .

Post  trantanhung_nt on Thu Oct 28, 2010 4:28 pm

Hi CHRIS COCHRANE ,
I was thankful that you last post for me and friends .
These articles have made me be more progressive ... and rock will play better ...
I send continue to you the landscape stone following ...
Comments you feel and share ...???
_ The MOUNTAINS ( Black - Basalt - stone - Khánh Vĩnh River , Weight 2,4 Kg )


Thank you .
Best Regards ,
Hưng- Trần .

trantanhung_nt
Member


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Re: MOUNTAINS and LAKES .

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