pots by Mateusz Grobelny

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Rob Addonizio on Fri May 27, 2011 3:35 am

Ok Rob, out with it...where is this photo taken???

I would like to know more about this display and the artist that created it.

Very interesting I must say Cool




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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  tim stubbs on Fri May 27, 2011 7:29 am

Rob Addonizio wrote:Ok Rob, out with it...where is this photo taken???

I would like to know more about this display and the artist that created it.

Very interesting I must say Cool



his name is Han Xue Nian .
Check out Lindsay Farr's world of bonsai series 2 on , http://bonsaifarm.tv/wob-series-2/wob2-6/

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Rob Kempinski on Fri May 27, 2011 12:56 pm

tim stubbs wrote:
Rob Addonizio wrote:Ok Rob, out with it...where is this photo taken???

I would like to know more about this display and the artist that created it.

Very interesting I must say Cool



his name is Han Xue Nian .

Rob - Tim is correct, it is a Ficus Microcarpa in the garden of Mr. Xuei Nian Han, a Chinese industrialist and bonsai lover. I gave him a commemorative plaque on behalf of BCI when I visited last year. He seems like a nice man and interestingly his garden is in the yard of his factory in the Guangzhou region of China. 100's of trees, mostly pine, that break many of the rules we have been told are rules of bonsai.



His trees and approach (as many in southern China) are different than what we are frequently told is the way to do bonsai. The Chinese proved to me at least that there are many ways to do bonsai and to always look to Japan for one's way is limiting. (It is pretty much agreed the origins of bonsai are in China not Japan). I enjoy the Japanese approach but I also enjoy seeing how artists can evolve bonsai into something new and interesting.

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  giomach on Fri May 27, 2011 8:53 pm

fiona wrote:
Rob Kempinski wrote:
Did anyone watch the video of him making the wood fired kiln?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qhVcy82ZMs&NR=1

I can't speak Polish so I don't fully understand what he was doing but it appears he welds a new kiln for each firing and he does it in the courtyard of an apartment complex. The kiln design shown in the video is a work of art itself.
Any additional explanation would be appreciated.

It certainly would. Such sharing of information and insight would be a proper use of the forum.

Rob,
thanks for posting the link. It's a very interesting video.

Fiona and Rob,
I'll try and offer a short account of what Mateusz says in the video.
It's his own project and it's called 'Aquarium of fire'. The idea was to break free from the concept of traditional, heavy looking, block shape kilns. So to construct a kiln, instead of traditional kiln materials he uses modern ones, i.e. silicon mats rather than fireclay bricks. The advantage of the silicon mat is also the light effect it produces.
The kiln design was inspired by the industrial cart (the idea of raising the construction above the ground) and the chimney, which wasn't meant to be vertical nor straight though, it would rather have a 'biological' shape. The contorted shape of the chimney helps keeping high temperature inside too.
Each kiln has a unique design however. He starts off with an idea and a drawing, then he welds the construction together and fits the silicon mats.
The unique design serves two purposes: 1) It's a way of expressing himself as a sculptor as each kiln is a sculpture in itself and 2) each firing is also unique: unique kiln means unique air circulation, plus there's the kind of wood he uses for firing, the weather factors like wind and humidity "and many more". As a result, and this is the reward, he can't predict exactly what the ceramics will look like, what the colour and even shape will be like, etc.
The technology of ceramics has to be followed. So it takes about 6 or 7 hours to raise the tempretature to ca. 300C (to get rid of the moisture in the clay), then you raise it again to around 600C (to get rid of the soot) and finally to around 1200-1250C. He says he likes to give the ceramics more time in the lower temperatures as it gives better colour effects (the fire smothers ceramics longer). Cooling down takes around 12 hours (it depends on the the thickness of the kiln walls). The whole process of firing takes about 48 hours.

Sin agad 'e. Hope it does the job like. Cool

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Rob Kempinski on Sat May 28, 2011 5:11 am

giomach wrote:
fiona wrote:
Rob Kempinski wrote:
Did anyone watch the video of him making the wood fired kiln?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qhVcy82ZMs&NR=1

I can't speak Polish so I don't fully understand what he was doing but it appears he welds a new kiln for each firing and he does it in the courtyard of an apartment complex. The kiln design shown in the video is a work of art itself.
Any additional explanation would be appreciated.

It certainly would. Such sharing of information and insight would be a proper use of the forum.

Rob,
thanks for posting the link. It's a very interesting video.

Fiona and Rob,
I'll try and offer a short account of what Mateusz says in the video.
It's his own project and it's called 'Aquarium of fire'. The idea was to break free from the concept of traditional, heavy looking, block shape kilns. So to construct a kiln, instead of traditional kiln materials he uses modern ones, i.e. silicon mats rather than fireclay bricks. The advantage of the silicon mat is also the light effect it produces.
The kiln design was inspired by the industrial cart (the idea of raising the construction above the ground) and the chimney, which wasn't meant to be vertical nor straight though, it would rather have a 'biological' shape. The contorted shape of the chimney helps keeping high temperature inside too.
Each kiln has a unique design however. He starts off with an idea and a drawing, then he welds the construction together and fits the silicon mats.
The unique design serves two purposes: 1) It's a way of expressing himself as a sculptor as each kiln is a sculpture in itself and 2) each firing is also unique: unique kiln means unique air circulation, plus there's the kind of wood he uses for firing, the weather factors like wind and humidity "and many more". As a result, and this is the reward, he can't predict exactly what the ceramics will look like, what the colour and even shape will be like, etc.
The technology of ceramics has to be followed. So it takes about 6 or 7 hours to raise the tempretature to ca. 300C (to get rid of the moisture in the clay), then you raise it again to around 600C (to get rid of the soot) and finally to around 1200-1250C. He says he likes to give the ceramics more time in the lower temperatures as it gives better colour effects (the fire smothers ceramics longer). Cooling down takes around 12 hours (it depends on the the thickness of the kiln walls). The whole process of firing takes about 48 hours.

Sin agad 'e. Hope it does the job like. Cool

Thanks for providing the interpretation. What an interesting, time consuming and serendipitous process.
I was just in Wroclav, but don't recall making his acquaintance. Maybe next time. Meanwhile, I'll follow his work.
Thanks again.

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Stone Monkey on Sat May 28, 2011 10:26 am

The Kilns and firing videos by Mateusz are amazing and as Rob said the kilns are a work of art also

Giomach

Thanks for the translation

Kind regards

Andy

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  tiennavi on Tue May 31, 2011 6:20 am

great!

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  DWThomas on Mon Jun 06, 2011 2:09 am

Wow! That kiln firing is mind boggling. I emailed the video link and the translated synopsis to the ceramics department head at the community college where I do some work, suggesting it would be a great project to do on the garden circle in front of the fine art center building (tongue in cheek, of course).

That did make me wonder if the firings might actually be happening on a university campus -- anybody know if Mr Grobelny is associated with an academic institution? Whether I would choose the pot styles for bonsai or not, I am awed by his creativity.

Some people really know how to have fun! Very Happy

DaveT

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Pawel P on Fri Dec 09, 2011 7:42 pm

New pot by my friend Mateusz Grobelny Smile









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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Pawel P on Tue Jan 03, 2012 7:36 pm











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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Tom Benda on Sat May 26, 2012 9:53 am

I wonder the material which this kiln's base construction is made of. Although iron melts at "1500 + °C", I heard it's unable to hold its shape and support anything at temperatures "800 + °C" ... Anyway, I can try it in my kiln next time.

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Walter Pall on Tue Jun 12, 2012 5:37 pm

Boston Ivy, Parthenicissus tricuspidatta planted into a Grobelny pot. It will look great with red foliage in fall I hope.



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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Smithy on Tue Jun 12, 2012 6:44 pm

That pot and tree go so well together. I think these are my favourite pots on the market.

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Walter Pall on Wed Jun 13, 2012 1:23 pm

European spruce, Picea abies, collected in Switzerland, pot by Mateusz Grobelny.






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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Walter Pall on Fri Oct 12, 2012 4:00 pm

As forseen the pot goes quite well with the fall colors.






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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Dan W. on Fri Oct 12, 2012 9:33 pm

Beautiful!!! I love the Ivy/pot combination, both in summer and fall.

Very interesting thread by the way everyone. I have gained much by reading the entire thread over the past several days.

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Walter Pall on Sat Dec 29, 2012 3:05 pm

By now these beasts by Mateusz have found the way to my garden. I even might have some trees fo them. I definitely have some trees for these monsters in the USA at Nature's Way Nursery in Harrsiburg, Pa. Well, I might even take some with me as extra luggage. Or does someone else in Europe have a tree for them? I might trade.






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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Dale Cochoy on Sat Dec 29, 2012 4:50 pm

Walter, I REALLY like that first one in your last post. I can tell a lot of work went into that!

D.

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  bumblebee on Sat Feb 16, 2013 3:28 am

I am really liking the pots that look like fossils.

Libby

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  mambo on Sun Feb 17, 2013 7:55 pm

The words I always have in my mind when designing or observing bonsai and bonsai displays are "balance and harmony". For me, if these elements do not exist then the composition is unsuccessful. Whilst the Grobelny pots (and many other "contemporary" pots) may be works or art in their own right, they detract far too much from the bonsai. In fact, thinking back on this thread, I can remember most of the pots, but few of the trees. As in my opinion, they should compliment each other, these compositions then in my mind do not work, and in some cases are so unbalanced that they look ugly to me. Worse still, they actually make the trees look worse than they are!


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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  mambo on Sun Feb 17, 2013 8:04 pm

[quote="Guest"]


Attention please! That’s what strikes me most in this discussion. The need of some artists to seek attention more than anything. I really see no other reason to create “bonsai” that are so far away from the essence of bonsai. If you really are an artist, you cope with the quality needed and work dedicated to achieve your goal. Or you choose to express yourself using an art form that fits your goal.

I actually do not believe that Walther e.g. does not know the bonsai art and culture in its original state, but I do think Walter (correct me if I am wrong Walter), do reject the traditional bonsai art in its true nature.
Either this or a strong need to seek attention. This is seen in many other art forms too. The lack of talent can cause this, or simply a need of drawing attention in order to be known and sell the product. The latter is often the case.

Bonsai is an art form that demands skills and long termed dedicated and detailed work.
If you do not want to go that path, you can try making a shortcut. You can use odd material, style it lightly or in a provocative manner, and next calling it something. Naturalistic for example. And say it is art.
Next, when someone like me say “look twice at this and use your sound judgment”, the answer is always calling me/us for “traditionalist” or “stuck in the mud”. Another label put on “explaining” why we are wrong or dull.
I assume this will go to for Kimura, Kato, Yamada, Kobayashi and more? Shocked

I do see some of this bonsai work, and others for that sake, called naturalistic, because then you have an explanation of why it is so. Typical for bonsai artists that do not cope, or don’t have the patience to finish the work. They put a label on explaining why it is so, and it is then accepted as (good) art. Seen in te art world in general too.

“Western bonsai” is also a label put on unfinished bonsai lacking quality and refinement. Another way to get around it, still believing it is bonsai art. We just don’t want to do it the Japanese way because it is boring (or too demanding perhaps?).

What strikes me most is the artist that seeks attention this easy way. Their works, in my opinion, are short cuts and easy attention trackers. Pop-bonsai or kitsch-bonsai I could label them. As it goes on in the art world in general. But I´m sure it will be defended as progressive and forward looking evolution of the art so it doesn’t stagnate and die? Right or wrong? Good or bad art?

I am just happy that I am in no need of seeking attention and being popular, because I do not need to sell anything. I just pay attention to doing bonsai the old fashioned boring way with details and dedicated work, trying to cope with the beauty of bonsai and come as far as I manage to do the classic bonsai. Bonsai that might also keep their artistic value on a long termed basis. That’s art for me.



Very Happy
Best regards
Morten Albek

A good few years ago when Walter was introducing his "naturalistic" style to the world, he stated that he had 300 trees in his garden. I replied that I felt naturalistic was an excuse to have poorly finished trees as it was impossible for one person to keep 300 trees correctly formed. Of course, a few weeks later when I was introduced to him at the Gingko, he turned tail and walked away without saying a single word! Very Happy

All these years later, I still think some of the most beautiful trees look completely natural, but, they are crafted superbly with intense attention to detail. Not allowed to grow willy-nilly (within certain limits).

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Pawel P on Mon Feb 18, 2013 10:51 pm

Hi Mambo,
for some time, you and all of bonsai people will see the harmony in pots by Mateusz Grobelny. We work on it Smile

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  mambo on Tue Feb 19, 2013 7:48 pm

Pawel P wrote:Hi Mambo,
for some time, you and all of bonsai people will see the harmony in pots by Mateusz Grobelny. We work on it Smile

Hi Pawel,

I am sorry but I would never use a pot of this style on any tree I can possibly think of. They - and this is just my personal taste - look brutish and ugly. Of course art, as is beauty is in the eye of the beholder. They may look nice on a shelf (in my case preferably behind some good books or as a bookend) but that's about it. I am certain that if I took some clay to the local nursery, handed it to the 5 year olds and asked them to make me a pot, they might come up with some designs like these.

If I felt I had to draw attention to my trees by using a pot like this, I would have to take stock and wonder if my work was of the quality I aspired to.

I challenge you to point out a single tree and pot combination posted on this thread that is actually balanced and in harmony, rather than "in your face"!

Nice tree -shame about the pot.


Last edited by mambo on Wed Feb 20, 2013 3:31 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  Pawel P on Tue Feb 19, 2013 8:59 pm

"I am certain that if I took some clay to the local nursery, handed it to the 5 year olds and asked them to make me a pot, they might come up with something designs like these. "
Go away to your 5 years old friends and start everything from the begining!!! sunny

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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

Post  mambo on Wed Feb 20, 2013 3:32 pm

Pawel,

One of the fascinating things about bonsai, is just when we think we have finished, we have to start all over again! Very Happy


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Re: pots by Mateusz Grobelny

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