Forest Scots Pine

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:08 am

Thanks Andy. It'll be a while before its ready though. See you tomorrow.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Neil Jaeger on Sat Aug 14, 2010 4:11 am

i know it might sound pretty cheesy but i hope that i am lucky enuff to have the talant that you have some day. beautiful tree and sketch.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sat Aug 14, 2010 4:29 am

Nothing cheesy about that. If we dont aspire to something, we never progress. When I first started, I never thought I would create anything that would inspire others. What you really need is an unhealthy obsession with bonsai. That helps alot. That said, there are loads of artists who inspire me and always will be. Thanks for the compliment. Very Happy

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  pongsatorn.k on Sat Aug 14, 2010 11:03 am

nice tree!, also nice drawing!.
I really wish to work on pine but all pine in Thailand are long needle and many place are forbidden to yamodori Crying or Very sad . this reason make the pine are not popular here as we don't know the correct season to do any thing with them.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Neil Jaeger on Sat Aug 14, 2010 4:16 pm

i am still very new to bonsai, i was wondering how "thick" of a cuttling can you take from scots pine? and after you take the cuttling do you have to use root hormone on scots pines? i guess what im trying to ask is can you just cut off a branch and put it in some soil? also can you get a bigger tree to start out with if you air-layer scots pine? i have been told that air-layering takes a LONG time on pines, is this true? sorry about all the questions but i really want a nice pine in my collection some day and your scots are just stunning. also i think in buffalo i can have a nice scots pine grow good here. thank you for your time.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  stavros on Sat Aug 14, 2010 6:02 pm

Pines in general cannot be grown from cuttings.....
Your best bet is to buy seedlings or young trees from a nursery.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Neil Jaeger on Sat Aug 14, 2010 8:03 pm

will baddeley wrote:Smithy. This tree started life as a large cutting. 3 years in the ground and 4 in a pot. When I originally posted this tree (first Autumn Colour) everyone said what a good tree pot combination it was. Fashion Eh!!! That pot is soooooo 2009!!!! Sad Shocked Very Happy
Sorry this was posted on the wrong thread. Cant delete it for some reason?

it says he started this as a cutting. that means you can just snip a branch off and dip end in root hormone and it will grow?

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  prestontolbert on Sat Aug 14, 2010 8:58 pm

That post was an accident. He was talking about a different tree.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Neil Jaeger on Sat Aug 14, 2010 10:47 pm

stavros wrote:Pines in general cannot be grown from cuttings.....
Your best bet is to buy seedlings or young trees from a nursery.

so is their an exception to the rule? or almost all pines dont respond to root hormone?

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Tue Aug 17, 2010 1:03 pm

Sorry for the confusing post. I don't know of any pines that can be raised from cuttings. They are also very poor at airlayering. The Japanese raise Pines from "cuttings" but this is different from what we call cuttings. They grow Pines from seed and wait for a change in stem colour and then remove the root. This gives a better, more even future root spread.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Neil Jaeger on Tue Aug 17, 2010 11:15 pm

I see, thanks for the explaination. Hope to see alot more of this beauitful tree.

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Back budding

Post  Guest on Tue Sep 28, 2010 2:56 pm

The needles in the middle of the picture, have now got little red buds. By pruning at the end of July/ begining of August, there is enough strong daylight to help with the formation of these buds. Good feeding too.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  quatrefi on Tue Sep 28, 2010 3:46 pm

Very beautiful and worked with a lot of skill !

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Hombre on Tue Sep 28, 2010 5:53 pm

Very beatiful tree Will , whish you the best for the future .
Just one question , removing the old needles and pruning the bubs on the and of the branches is a work which you do at the same time of the year? (autumn )

Best regards Lazaros.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Kev Bailey on Tue Sep 28, 2010 5:57 pm

There are always exceptions that "prove the rule". This is from Brent's Evergreen Gardenworks
Pinus parviflora 'Zuisho' This is a short needled bluish green cultivar, greener than most others. It is rather slow growing, and slower from grafts than our other cultivars. The claim to fame for 'Zuisho' is that it can be grown from cuttings, although it is difficult. Stems are thinner and internodes longer on this cultivar than most of the others, although with age it does form a nice thick trunk. Grafting to Pinus thunbergii helps it form thicker stems with more vigor.

I did the seedling cutting trick with my Japanese Black Pines and it proved easy and works surprisingly well.

_________________
“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” - Charles Darwin.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  DaveA on Tue Sep 28, 2010 7:26 pm

will baddeley wrote:I found this old photo this evening. Probably a year after collection.

Will, great tree and great work. When I saw this pic, I was instantly reminded of a Ponderosa pine I picked up this spring. I'll have to keep this in mind as I develop it over the coming years.







Dave

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Tue Sep 28, 2010 7:38 pm

Hombre wrote:Very beatiful tree Will , whish you the best for the future .
Just one question , removing the old needles and pruning the bubs on the and of the branches is a work which you do at the same time of the year? (autumn )

Best regards Lazaros.

Hello Hombre. Removing the old needles need only be done if you are wiring the tree. I plucked the needles as I dont need buds below the tufts of needles I have left. If you want to wire and you want backbudding, then cut the needles with scissors. This preserves the tiny, dormant buds between the pairs of needles.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Hombre on Tue Sep 28, 2010 9:44 pm

Thank you Will for useful information.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Tue Sep 28, 2010 10:06 pm

Hello Dave. I see why you posted your Pine, they are very similar. Long term I think yours has better qualities. Better taper and bark. Look forward to its development.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  BrianLarson on Thu Sep 30, 2010 4:52 am

Very nice pine! It has a lot of character for a tree that came out of a commercial forest Very Happy You have done well with it and the ramification is looking very nice!

Brian

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Thu Sep 30, 2010 6:19 pm

Thankyou Brian. The Forestry Commision, who own a lot of our commercial woodland, allow clubs and individuals to collect trees that are contorted, self sewn and under 2 feet(600mm), because they aren't of commercial value.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  bonsaistud on Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:48 pm

G'Day Will...

What a marvelous documentery...and what a treasure trove of info on pines for anyone wanting to learn about develloping pine bonsai...

Great tree...great work...and great presentation.

Top drawer Will...

Pat...the Stranger Wearing the White Hat (the barber takes some of ir each time I visit) Riding off Wildly on his White Horse...in ALL Directions...

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sat Oct 02, 2010 2:13 pm

Hello Pat. Thankyou for your comments. The information is for Scots Pine and some other 2 needle Pines, not for all Pines. I think that Sylvestris is the best of all the Pines for bonsai, due to its ability to back bud, its relatively short needles and more delicate twigs and branches.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  littleart-fx on Sun Oct 03, 2010 10:18 pm

@Will

Such a keen eye in time!!!
Thanx for youre patience,....and the sharing of it!

I do learn a lot from a distance!

grtzz....Machiel....who just returned from spain....and was at high altitudes..........i realy need that defender.....hahaha Twisted Evil

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Mon Oct 04, 2010 1:12 am

littleart-fx wrote:@Will

Such a keen eye in time!!!
Thanx for youre patience,....and the sharing of it!

I do learn a lot from a distance!

grtzz....Machiel....who just returned from spain....and was at high altitudes..........i realy need that defender.....hahaha Twisted Evil

Hello Machiel. Great to see you back and posting again. Good time in Spain?

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

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