Forest Scots Pine

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Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Fri Aug 06, 2010 10:38 pm

I collected this pine from a commercial forest about 4 years ago. The reason for collecting was the quality of the bark for a small pine. It was reduced to 1 branch, potted and left for 2 years. This tree was then styled but I wasn't happy with it, so I removed the wire and jinned the bottom branch. It was then left alone, with the exception of pruning.

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Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Fri Aug 06, 2010 10:53 pm

The first job was to clean out 2 and 3 year old needles. Then I went through the tree and pruned the branch junctions back to 2 shoots. Pines have a habit of throwing out multiple buds from the same place.

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Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sat Aug 07, 2010 12:45 am

The next job was to prune out the buds on the ends of the branches. Then the new needles were removed, leaving a small bunch near the cut end. This was done to aid wiring and promote backbudding in the needled areas.

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Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sat Aug 07, 2010 1:18 am

The Pine was then wired.

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Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sat Aug 07, 2010 1:24 am

Wired right to the needles.

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Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sat Aug 07, 2010 2:00 am

And finally placed. The image I want is of a Scots Pine in the wild. Most of the branches move in an upward direction. Any pads will be developed in the next few years

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Todd Ellis on Sat Aug 07, 2010 2:18 am

Will, thanks for sharing the progression of your work. One day, I'll be able to do this. The bark on this pine is beautiful; very old looking. The jinned branch has a lot of character. Salut, Todd

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sat Aug 07, 2010 3:05 am

Thanks Todd. I think jins are a lot more convincing, if they are styled as a branch before they are stripped of the bark. One of the reasons for posting this tree was the fact that it came from planted forest. Permission can be easily gained for little trees like this as they are not suitable for the timber trade.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Todd Ellis on Sat Aug 07, 2010 3:10 am

Is the tree in your current avitar from this same forest?

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sat Aug 07, 2010 3:32 am

No, the one in my avatar is from the Highlands in Scotland. Beautiful, twisty,Caledonean Pines. The only native Pine in the UK.

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Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sat Aug 07, 2010 5:33 am

As this Pine developes and ramifies, the idea is to create more deadwood and break up the silhouette into clouds. It was too dark for a decent pic last night. Will post a better one later.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Seth Ellwood on Sat Aug 07, 2010 3:04 pm

Nice progression I agree with the idea of wiring a branch b4 jinning it . It works better with the overall compisition and flows right along with the rest of the branches and does not feel artificial. What I mean about the artificial is the tree grew one way and then was styled another and the jins look like a after thought or are going in a diffrent direction as the tree creating a unbalanced look. Vs looking like the tree has been growing this way through out it's life and during the struggle to survive it has had a few casualtys along the way but keeps going.

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Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sat Aug 07, 2010 4:53 pm

Here's a better pic

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Paul B (Scotland) on Sat Aug 07, 2010 11:36 pm


Hiya Will,

What a difference a bit of light makes! The last image you posted looks great.

You mentioned earlier in this thread that you wanted it to look like a Pine in the wild. I think you've got it spot on.

I walk past literally 100's of Pines on a weekly basis - woodland and lone pines. Many of the lone Pines have similar characterisitics to yours and many on the edges of woodlands also display these characterisitics.

The features I am thinking of are the mostly bare half of the trunk and the upward growth of the branches. These features to me are a 'true' Scots Pine, certainly where I live.

Really nicely done! I send you a virtual large dram of Aberlour (as I am currently enjoying !) for creating this image.

Is all the work you've done to this recent? How long between removing old needles, reducing junctions to 2 branches, removing buds and wiring?

Slainte Mhath !

Paul

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sun Aug 08, 2010 12:36 am

This isn't one of the "quick fix" pines we see so often these days. Scrunched, spiralled and pulled in to create an instant image. If I get a chance in the next couple of days I will sketch an idea of what I hope it will look like. All the work was carried out in one day. The end of July/ begining of August is the optimum time for working and pruning Pines, as long as they have been fed well throughout the year. In August Scots Pine put on a lot of weight. Pruning induces good budding at this time and any damage will heal quickly. The virtual malt went down a treat. Abalour has a soft peaty character. Cheers. Very Happy

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  kauaibonsai on Sun Aug 08, 2010 12:59 am

don't know pines, Will, but recognize good work when I see it.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sun Aug 08, 2010 11:04 pm

Thankyou Kauai. Glad you like it. Very Happy

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Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Sun Aug 08, 2010 11:14 pm

Smithy. This tree started life as a large cutting. 3 years in the ground and 4 in a pot. When I originally posted this tree (first Autumn Colour) everyone said what a good tree pot combination it was. Fashion Eh!!! That pot is soooooo 2009!!!! Sad Shocked Very Happy
Sorry this was posted on the wrong thread. Cant delete it for some reason?


Last edited by will baddeley on Mon Aug 09, 2010 12:36 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Al-bonsaispirit on Mon Aug 09, 2010 10:46 am

Thanks Will for another great post.

I have a few questions,

You are suggesting, better you are doing Very Happy, to eliminate all new buds in august to get a back budding. Do you use this thecnic all years in scot pine ? Do you use it in all pines or only in pines in refined state?

My experience with this pines it is very short put my pines are quite strong and with a lot of energy. So I suposse I could try to work as you are doing in your pine.

thanks in advance.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Mon Aug 09, 2010 12:48 pm

Hello Al. The technique of removing the buds/ shoots on this years growth, in August, will promote back budding and ramification. Some buds will apear lower down the branches but the majority will grow around the cut needled area. This is not for refinement, where new candles are cut or pinched when still soft and has a more subtle effect on budding. I only have Scots pines, so I cannot say how this systen will work on other Pines. Two needle pines are probably treated in the same way though.

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Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Tue Aug 10, 2010 10:50 pm

I found this old photo this evening. Probably a year after collection.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Wed Aug 11, 2010 7:45 am

will baddeley wrote:This isn't one of the "quick fix" pines we see so often these days. Scrunched, spiralled and pulled in to create an instant image.

Good work and I like the long term work perspective too! I like the natural feeling of the jin too. I make jins in a slightly different process, but with the same result. I strip fresh branches for bark and leaves, and then I wire them immediately still being soft. I style them as if they are still live branches and thereafter I let them dry out naturally. this takes a few months or so, and they are afterwards looking very natural. Then the wire is removed by cutting it off like on living branches.

If you also turn and twist them while still being fresh and soft, cracks and broken tissue will add even more age when the fresh jinned branches dry out.

Regards
Morten Albek

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Wed Aug 11, 2010 5:51 pm

Thankyou Morton. It is always tempting to go for a more "finished" image and I had to slap myself on the wrist several times with this one. I too twist the branches for added effect but wiring and shaping, treating the jin as a more long term project works very well.

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Forest Scots Pine

Post  Guest on Fri Aug 13, 2010 1:29 pm

I had the oportunity to do a little sketch last night. This is somewhere close to the image I would like from this tree. I'm not sure about the dead branch at the top though.

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

Post  Stone Monkey on Fri Aug 13, 2010 10:33 pm

Love the tree Will, fab drawing too Very Happy

Look forward to seeing this tree on show in the future

All the best

Andy

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Re: Forest Scots Pine

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