A little carving on a choke cherry

View previous topic View next topic Go down

A little carving on a choke cherry

Post  Bob Pressler on Sun Aug 01, 2010 1:42 am

Here are a before and after of the initial carving on a choke cherry. Love to hear your thoughts
before

After



Last edited by Bob Pressler on Sun Aug 01, 2010 1:43 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : spelling)

Bob Pressler
Member


Back to top Go down

A little carving on a choke cherry

Post  Guest on Sun Aug 01, 2010 2:12 am

Hello Bob. I'm not familiar with the Choke Cherry but I recognise the quality of this species. Looks very much like the Blackthorn in the UK. The deadwood looks to me, like it has a fair amount of decay. In the long run, it may be prudent to hollow out, rather than try and preserve what you have done. The styling is very good by the way. Very Happy

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: A little carving on a choke cherry

Post  Bob Pressler on Sun Aug 01, 2010 2:23 am

Its a Prunus Virginiana and the wood is incredibly hard ( except where I took out the borer on the main trunk). The smaller trunk on the right is hollowed out.

Bob Pressler
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: A little carving on a choke cherry

Post  Russell Coker on Sun Aug 01, 2010 3:19 pm

This brings up a point that I'm sure has been made before. We all need to do a better job of including a Latin name when we use common names as cryptic as "blackthorn" and "choke cherry", even if it's just the Genus. It is easy to forgive our South-east Asian friends who use local names that no one else can pronounce muchless spell, but for the English speaking rest of us there really isn't a good excuse. I'm not talking about everyday junipers and azaleas here, but local common names of not-so-common plants are just that - local. For me, "choke cherry" or "chokeberry" is Aronia arbutifolia, still in the Rose family but not Prunus. And while Prunus virginiana seems to be found all over North America, it is absent for the Deep South states except for Georgia so it isn't something I easily recognize.

Anyway, Bob, beautiful Prunus virginiana! And worthy of a MUCH finer pot.

Russell

Russell Coker
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: A little carving on a choke cherry

Post  Todd Ellis on Sun Aug 01, 2010 3:41 pm

Bob, have you hade any problems with fungus on your "Prunus v."? These grow like weeds in Virginia, but most have at least one or two branches with lesions of black "goo" (fungus). I have been reluctant to collect them. They are beautiful trees and the late Spring/early Summer flowers are very nice. Has yours flowered yet? The fruits are 3/8 inches (5mm) in diameter, and a dark "cherry" black. A great looking tree. Your tree has a very nice shape!
Salut, Todd

Todd Ellis
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: A little carving on a choke cherry

Post  Russell Coker on Sun Aug 01, 2010 4:01 pm

Todd,

I think that goo is sap, and the signs of borer damage rather than fungus. It's a big problem with Prunus, Pyrus and Malus - especially Prunus.

Russell

Russell Coker
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: A little carving on a choke cherry

Post  JimLewis on Sun Aug 01, 2010 4:42 pm

Russell Coker wrote:Todd,

I think that goo is sap, and the signs of borer damage rather than fungus. It's a big problem with Prunus, Pyrus and Malus - especially Prunus.

Russell

That is exactly right. I've not had it on any of my pears, but I've pretty much given up on plums and cherries around here.

_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

JimLewis
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: A little carving on a choke cherry

Post  Bob Pressler on Sun Aug 01, 2010 5:27 pm

Todd Ellis wrote:Bob, have you hade any problems with fungus on your "Prunus v."? These grow like weeds in Virginia, but most have at least one or two branches with lesions of black "goo" (fungus). I have been reluctant to collect them. They are beautiful trees and the late Spring/early Summer flowers are very nice. Has yours flowered yet? The fruits are 3/8 inches (5mm) in diameter, and a dark "cherry" black. A great looking tree. Your tree has a very nice shape!
Salut, Todd

Not really any fungus problems. This flowers every year late Feb. early March. The fruit has never stayed on the tree for more than a few weeks.
Like others have said the "goo" is probably sap because of borers, they seem to really like these trees. The wood is extremely hard and stands up well
though.
I plan on a new pot this winter( I repot most of my deciduous trees in Jan. and Feb. here) this one was just handy at the time. Any suggestions as to type of pot?

Bob Pressler
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: A little carving on a choke cherry

Post  Todd Ellis on Mon Aug 02, 2010 12:09 am

In addition to the goo, there are also black cankers which grow on some of the branches. These are not gooey, but rough and unsightly and they seem to spread. These branches are also dead or close to dead. I have seen hundreds of black cherrys in the Piedmont and Tide Water area. Most of them have these black cankers. Any idea what "those" are? I thougth it was fungus related, but I also thought the goo was fungus related.... borers can be dealt with!
Thanks!

Todd Ellis
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: A little carving on a choke cherry

Post  Sponsored content Today at 11:12 pm


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum