Japanese Maple Start?

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Japanese Maple Start?

Post  brycebertola on Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:18 am

Hello,

So i have been toying with the idea of purchasing a large japanese maple tree from a nursery (one of them in a 2 foot wide pot) and using that as a starter tree to collect from via air layering, then trunk chopping below the layers, etc.

Has anyone had much experience with this? I would probably plant the tree in the ground for the winter, then start with the first layering in the spring and let it develop throughout the next year.

Is it true that you could do multiple layerings on a single branch, as long as there is foliage within each section to support new root growth? (for instance, one single branch could turn into 3 or 4 short stumps just through one seasons worth of layering)

Also, I'm a huge fan of deciduous trees as bonsai, and I wanted to get some recommendations for species that would survive well here in utah.

brycebertola
Member


Back to top Go down

Japanese Maple Start?

Post  Guest on Wed Jul 28, 2010 11:36 am

Hello Paldimo. Most Japanese Maples are very good candidates for airlayering. The stronger the top growth, the quicker the airlayer will root. You can layer all over the tree(multiples on one branch) but they will probably be slower.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Japanese Maple Start?

Post  bonsaisr on Wed Jul 28, 2010 2:38 pm

One caution. Most named varieties of Japanese maple from garden centers are grafted. If you want to use the bottom, it might be a different cultivar from the top.
Unless you are going into business, why would you want umpteen starters all of the same variety?
Iris

bonsaisr
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Japanese Maple Start?

Post  brycebertola on Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:14 pm

I want to get several pre-bonsai candidates to select from. I also wanted to get a variety of sizes to train as bonsai as well. Most of these trees would be split between my sister-in-law, who graduated with her bachelors degree in horticulture, and myself.

Also, what do you recommend as a decent potting medium? I've seen some people use JUST red lava rock. Would that be optimal for strong root growth?

brycebertola
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Japanese Maple Start?

Post  brycebertola on Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:16 pm

Also, does air layering result in 100% success, or is there a possibility that it would not yield any results and eventually kill the tree?

brycebertola
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Japanese Maple Start?

Post  Kev Bailey on Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:35 pm

Not always 100% success rate from Maples. On common or garden Acer palmatum you will usually get 80 -90% success rate but as Iris says some are grafted because they are varieties that don't do well on their own roots. Many others are grafted out of expediency in the propagation nurseries. Some, such as the Lions Mane Maple do very well on their own roots when air layered. There are far too many varieties to go into here. You need to get hold of a good book such as Van Gelderen's for the information on every variety.

_________________
“It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” - Charles Darwin.

Kev Bailey
Admin


Back to top Go down

Re: Japanese Maple Start?

Post  chansen on Wed Jul 28, 2010 5:11 pm

paldimo wrote:I want to get several pre-bonsai candidates to select from. I also wanted to get a variety of sizes to train as bonsai as well. Most of these trees would be split between my sister-in-law, who graduated with her bachelors degree in horticulture, and myself.

Also, what do you recommend as a decent potting medium? I've seen some people use JUST red lava rock. Would that be optimal for strong root growth?

I've been using a modified version Boon's mix (Boon's mix is akadama, lava, pumice, hort. charcoal, decomposed granite) for a while here with great results. There is a feeling amongst some club members that a more organic mix is needed here due to high temps, low humidity, and relatively higher elevation (all of these contribute to high evaporation rates). You mostly just need to balance your watering with your soil mix. I have my trees on an automatic sprinkler system, and right now they get watered twice a day. Once in the morning, and once in the afternoon.

You will face a little challenge with what's locally available. You can find pumice a lot of places. Lava is harder to come by, and I have yet to find a close source that can get me what I want in reasonable volumes. Cactus and Tropicals does carry Akadama. This is the first year I've tried it, so I can't say much about how well it will survive a Utah winter with all the freeze/thaw cycles we get. Turface is available and some use it as a substitute for Akadama. I haven't gone out to get any recently. I would do a google search for 'turface distributors' to find a local one. I also know that some locals are using a product called Utelite. It's an expanded shale product. The stuff you'll find locally is too small, but there are some club members that made a trip to Wanship to get some. I know they've got some for sale. The club meeting is tonight, if you want to go let me know and I'll send you time and location details. Now is not the time to repot anything deciduous, so you don't need to be in too much hurry to find potting medium. I modified the Boon mix a little based on what was available. I use equal parts lava, pumice, akadama, some hort. charcoal and bark. I've substituted turface for Akadama in the past and still had good results. I'm pretty close to abandoning the bark, but I'll wait and see what happens next spring.

As far as deciduous trees that do well here... it depends on what kind of winter care you can give them. As you probably have noticed, we get a lot of freeze/thaw cycles here. Just this last March we hit the 60s one day, and it was snowing the next. Spring is difficult for the same reasons, higher day time temps with frequent night time freezes/snows, and on average this lasts until Mother's Day. I have a few Acer palmatums, some just garden variety and some named species. My trident maples really don't like the spring weather we get, so they need a little more protection in the spring. I have a big zelkova, some prunus I ordered from Bill Valavanis, and I've had an elm or two at different times. My hornbeams did really poorly this year. I lost a large collected American hornbeam that I brought back from Virginia, and all the Korean hornbeam seedlings I ordered died. I suspect it was a weather issue. Most deciduous trees would do fine here so long as you can give them adequate winter/spring protection.

Hope this helps,

Christian


chansen
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Japanese Maple Start?

Post  Sponsored content Today at 10:00 pm


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum