The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

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The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  moshe emergui on Mon Jul 19, 2010 9:36 pm

Hello everyone
I found this tree on the pile of leftover trimmed trees, with a few old trees abut Two years ago
I'm just beginning to design it and I will update you with the appearance of first leaves. I must say that my students, Chavi and Daniel helped in removing the leaves, wiring, etc. ..









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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  mike page on Mon Jul 19, 2010 9:42 pm

That will be a great bonsai someday!!

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The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  Guest on Mon Jul 19, 2010 10:08 pm

A great find Moshe. Great base to it. Very powerful. Look forward to future pics. Very Happy

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  luc tran on Mon Jul 19, 2010 11:04 pm

a very nice find. personally i would remove that long thick straight branch. Smile

Luc

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  Todd Ellis on Tue Jul 20, 2010 2:06 am

Very nice tree. I like the selection of branches you kept. I would keep them all until you are sure of its future design. ThumbsUp Salut, Todd

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  moshe emergui on Tue Jul 20, 2010 5:01 am

HI MIKE,WILL,LUC,TODD.
Thank you for your comments, I have a few more raw materials in various stages of training, number of trees are in very high level, I think that I will not remove the left branch.In a few days already can see the first leaves.So I will update
Thank you

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  moshe emergui on Tue Jul 20, 2010 9:41 am

Another tree after removing the leaves. on the background daniel My student .

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  amazonida on Tue Jul 20, 2010 2:07 pm

Hi moshe,
did you find it on the ground? or in a nursery?
do you think that the pot is to small comparring to the tree itself? i mean, do you have to take extra care on watering your bonsai?
Thanks

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  Dustin Mann on Tue Jul 20, 2010 2:21 pm

Both of those trees have incredible base,trunk, and type of quick taper that hides trunk chop. I especially like multiple views and round appearance(as opposed to flat 2 dimension) Just let those branches thicken by letting them grow 12", cut back then grow again. By getting sub-branching off main trunk will speed up thickening of main branches. Shalom. Dustin Mann Very Happy Very Happy

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  Rob Kempinski on Tue Jul 20, 2010 7:00 pm

Great finds. Love the nebari. Keep up posted.

I just discovered eleagnus this year and started three of them. Them seem to do well in the hot Florida climate.

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  William Feldman on Tue Jul 20, 2010 8:09 pm

Rob Kempinski wrote:Them seem to do well in the hot Florida climate.
Wikipedia says that Elaeagnus pungens is currently rated a Category II exotic invasive species by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council. I imagine there are a bunch growing in vacant lots that nobody would object to people collecting. Similar to Asian pears up here around DC. If you happen upon any good Elaeagnus collection sites, please let me know! (Same for Casuarinas.)

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  moshe emergui on Tue Jul 20, 2010 8:29 pm

amazonida wrote:Hi moshe,
did you find it on the ground? or in a nursery?
do you think that the pot is to small comparring to the tree itself? i mean, do you have to take extra care on watering your bonsai?
Thanks
hi amazonida
I found this tree along with the 20 other trees and in a pile of trash, the size of the plant seems quite reasonable
and do not need extra care.

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  moshe emergui on Tue Jul 20, 2010 8:44 pm

Dustin Mann wrote:Both of those trees have incredible base,trunk, and type of quick taper that hides trunk chop. I especially like multiple views and round appearance(as opposed to flat 2 dimension) Just let those branches thicken by letting them grow 12", cut back then grow again. By getting sub-branching off main trunk will speed up thickening of main branches. Shalom. Dustin Mann Very Happy Very Happy

hi dustin
That's right, note thate the left branch in the first picture above, there is a blue wire on the branch, first branch was very long and I shortened it to the intermediate design,I really agree with you.i Have to let some branches grow long to get the correct proportions .

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  amazonida on Wed Jul 21, 2010 12:24 am

thanks Moshe,
i wish i could have that lucky trash in Brazil Laughing
keep us posted

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  Lukas Sirotny on Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:27 am

This elaeagnus is really very promising middle size tree!!! The next one is not bad at all as well Cool . You say you have 20 of these, maybe any tree swap in the future? Wink Unfortunately, this specie doesn´t grow in our climate (central Europe), so no chance to find something with so much potential!
Very good work, I will be looking forward to see its next progression ThumbsUp .

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  Rob Kempinski on Wed Jul 21, 2010 6:45 pm

William Feldman wrote:
Rob Kempinski wrote:Them seem to do well in the hot Florida climate.
Wikipedia says that Elaeagnus pungens is currently rated a Category II exotic invasive species by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council. I imagine there are a bunch growing in vacant lots that nobody would object to people collecting. Similar to Asian pears up here around DC. If you happen upon any good Elaeagnus collection sites, please let me know! (Same for Casuarinas.)

There are many in local landscapes but I haven't seen any abandoned ones. Wonder why its invasive? Doesn't seem to spread.

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  Russell Coker on Fri Jul 30, 2010 3:10 pm

They are great material, but you have to get the branches where you want them while they are young and pliable. Old wood is hard to bend, but you can cut them back to nothing and they grow back quickly. Large cuts don't heal well so you better plan on them being a feature like Moshe did. Leaves reduce fast too, but the first ones back after a trim and a repot will be big. I let mine grow out a little and remove these. The rest will be smaller.

As for invassiveness, I've seen the woods on the edges of wholesale nurseries that grow them choked with them. They put on a tasty little fruit that the birds love, then poop them everywhere. If you've ever noticed them planted as a hedge they explode with these really long whip-like shoots between shearings. They have really long thorns and use them for support and can climb into the tops of nearby trees in about ten minutes.

The flower is fragrant too. I love it when mine blooms.

Russell


Last edited by Russell Coker on Fri Jul 30, 2010 3:39 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : added thought)

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  Bob Pressler on Fri Jul 30, 2010 3:40 pm

Awesome finds. You have the start of some very nice bonsai there. I wish we had trash piles like that here.

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  JimLewis on Fri Jul 30, 2010 4:13 pm

You can get drunk on the smell of a grove of these things in bloom -- almost sickening. It's called Russian olive, but the fruit is sweet. Birds do love it. Gorgeous when the wind is blowing because of the silvery underside of the leaves.

A word of caution if you collect. I almost always found black widow spider nesting deep inside the canopies (they are very dense and dark inside).

_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  moshe emergui on Wed Aug 04, 2010 4:48 pm


Thanks to all who respond and referred to this entrance.
This picture was taken today, I will update you with the development of the tree, in real time.





moshe emergui

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  Pavel Slovák on Wed Aug 04, 2010 7:15 pm

Hi Moshe.

It looks like a promising development tree. I look forward to the next photo. Congratulations. Very Happy ThumbsUp

Pavel

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  Walter Pall on Thu Aug 05, 2010 6:20 am

Moshe,

you are on the right way. Very good material.

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Re: The future of Elaeagnus pungens not far

Post  moshe emergui on Thu Aug 05, 2010 7:16 pm

pavel & walter

I really appreciate your opinion. In fact I have so much great material that I collected for years and so little time to work on. Especially very old olive trees as you saw walter when you visited in Israel for the Workshop And in my place.




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