amur maple

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amur maple

Post  Ricky Keaton on Thu Jul 15, 2010 2:16 am




is this a iron problem?

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Re: amur maple

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Thu Jul 15, 2010 11:12 am

is this a iron problem?

Could be, or a pH problem. What are you using for soil and fertilizer?


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Re: amur maple

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Thu Jul 15, 2010 11:18 am

North Dakota State says "Subject to chlorosis on heavy alkaline soils" They say this at least three times in a two page article so it must be a problem for them.

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Re: amur maple

Post  JimLewis on Thu Jul 15, 2010 12:59 pm

That is chlorosis. It could be caused by one of two or three of the minor minerals. I suggest you buy a bottle of "chelated iron" from a nursery. Those usually also have all the other minor elements, too. Apply according to label instructions (you will need to extrapolate, since the directions are aimed at field-grown plants). Usually 10 cc per gallon of water is sufficient. I tend to add 20-30 cc to a large bottle of fish emulsion fertilizer and use that.

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Re: amur maple

Post  Billy M. Rhodes on Thu Jul 15, 2010 1:07 pm

Here in Florida we grow a flowering tropical called Wrightia religiosa and every summer it developed yellow leaves, but we started using a product called "Iron Safe" by Lilly Miller. This seems to have prevented the yellow leaves.
pH greatly affects the ability of a plant to take up nutrients. I have seen tables that showed the nutrient take up of Azaleas at various pH levels. The NDSU site says that anything over 7.5 is not good for Amur Maples.
pH levels can be affected by the makeup of soil, the content of water and fertilizer. I could not find a pH statement on the "Iron Safe."

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Re: amur maple

Post  John Quinn on Fri Jul 16, 2010 12:30 am

In addition to iron deficiency, magnesium deficiency will have a similar chlorotic appearance primarily in the interveinal tissues...i.e. the veins still have green color as does your example.

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Re: amur maple

Post  Ricky Keaton on Fri Jul 16, 2010 2:22 am

thanx heaps u guys i will try what u say,
all i could find was the iron problem,
how do u check ur ph?

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Re: amur maple

Post  Kev Bailey on Fri Jul 16, 2010 7:45 am

To check pH you can use a soil test meter or a chemical kit. Google "testing soil pH"

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Re: amur maple

Post  AlainK on Fri Jul 16, 2010 9:50 am

The water here is very hard and I've had the same problem with mine.

Then the trees are more prone to have leaf spots, which is not really dangerous on a healthy subject, but I lost one last year that had become really weak.

So this year, I used anti-chlorosis fertilizer with iron and magnesium, and the trees are now much healthier. Some of the older leaves are still yellow, but the new ones are a very dark healthy-looking green. I'll try to post photos later.

Next year, I'll use the same fertilizer right when buds break out.

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Re: amur maple

Post  JimLewis on Fri Jul 16, 2010 3:00 pm

A comment:

When we recommend a "balanced" fertilizer here, we're usually talking about a somewhat equal dose of NPK, but the term should also be used to include a fertilizer with all of the micronutrients included in the mix. Miracle Gro, Miracid and other fertilizers of that type all come with micronutrients listed on the package.

Fish emulsion, seaweed extract, and other "organic" fertilizers do not list any micronutrients on their labels. In the US, at least, all ingredients of a fertilizer must be listed, leading one to think here are few if any of the necessary micronutrients in these fertilizers -- despite the advertising and PR materials that plug these products.

Since I've occasionally had chlorosis issues even when using fertilizers that list all of the micronutrients on the label, I comclude that in many if not most cases we need to supplement the micronutrient dosage we give our trees. I always have a bottle of micronutrients on my shelves. Currently, I have a pint bottle of "Fertilome Liquid Iron and other Mico Nutrients" and "Chelated General Purpose Minor Element Spray" from Southern Agricultural Insecticides, Inc., also in a pint bottle.

When I buy a new quart bottle of fish emulstion, I always add 20-30 cc of one of these to it and shake it well. When I'm using mostly Miracle-Gro and similar products that come with micronutrients, once or twice a summer I'll mix up a gallon of it and add 10-20 cc.

BUT . . . I do recall reading somewhere that you can overdose your trees with these micronutrients (I've searched and cannot find the article or comment again) so I wouldn't recommend giving your trees more than this over the course of a growing season. I do believe that an occasional supplement doesn't hurt, and I almost never have a chlorosis issue any more except in my very smallest trees if I'm not careful. I use the inorganic fertilizers with these, so almost always add some micros when I feed them.

For those who do not know, micronutrients include:

Magnesium
Iron
Manganese
Zinc
Copper
Sulfur
The following are seldom included in micronutrient mixtures because (I think) needed amounts are minute:
Boron
Molybdenum
Chlorine

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Re: amur maple

Post  Ricky Keaton on Sat Jul 31, 2010 3:09 am

Does this sound reasonable?

Step 1
Know what types of plants are susceptible to magnesium deficiency. All plants can be deficient in magnesium, but tomato plants and apple trees are particularly prone.

Step 2
Examine the leaves of affected plants for orange bands between the veins, which indicates magnesium deficiency. These orange bands may later turn brown if the deficiency isn't treated soon enough.

Step 3
Identify signs of the withering, another indication of magnesium deficiency in plants. This may lead to necrosis of the plant's leaves and eventually defoliation, which could kill the plant.

Step 4
Pay special attention to your plants after applying a high-potassium fertilizer. A fertilizer with a high potassium content tends to hold the magnesium in the soil. This keeps this vital nutrient from entering the roots of the plant, which may result in magnesium deficiency.

Step 5
Treat the magnesium deficiency with Epsom salts. Mix a solution of 8 rounded tablespoons of Epsom salts, which is magnesium sulfate, in 2.5 gallons of water. Add a drop or two of liquid detergent and spray your plants with the solution


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Re: amur maple

Post  JimLewis on Sat Jul 31, 2010 3:14 pm

I don't know about you, but I find it difficult to distinguish between the various chlorosis-producing deficiencies. I think I'd just rather give my trees a dose or two of a complete fertilizer that covers all the bases.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: amur maple

Post  Guest on Sat Jul 31, 2010 7:31 pm

Yes I agree with Jim. Very difficult to distinguish between deficiencies so I tend to treat across the spectrum.

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Re: amur maple

Post  NeilDellinger on Thu Aug 05, 2010 12:53 pm

I had a problem with a chlorotic maple last year. I tried iron, etc.... but until I learned that the acidity of the soil plays an important role in the availability of those nutrients I was not succesful in resolving the problem.

On two chlorotic trident maples trees I tried the following:
1) Scratched peat into the soil, not much just a couple table spoons
2) Did the same with cottonseed meal.

The tree that I used peat on cleared up within 1 week, the tree with cottonseed meal took about 4 weeks. Problem solved.

Hope this helps.

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Re: amur maple

Post  Ricky Keaton on Sat Aug 07, 2010 1:41 pm

thnx Neil i will give that a try plus i am goin to get ph test kit.

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Re: amur maple

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