The DE-construction of a privet

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The DE-construction of a privet

Post  JimLewis on Thu May 06, 2010 8:09 pm

I'll start this story with "Once Upon a Time" (in 2006).



Then, the shari got all soft and pulpy. Minwax wood hardener did no good, so I dug down to hard wood. (2-09)



It leafed out that summer, but several of the branches were weak and leter died.



Desperate now, because the shari again became soft and pithy, I treated it with lime sulfur (which I dislike on deciduous trees) and as I expected it has done nothing at all except turn an unnatural white.

This tree is going downhill fast. Any suggestions as to making something out of it will be appreciated and desperately tried. I've had this tree for a LONG time.



One side:



The back:



As you can see in that last picture that right-hand branch is a sickly yellow and seems to be on the way out.

The roots are fine, and I get dozens of sucker sprouts around the base every week.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Joe Hatfield on Thu May 06, 2010 8:14 pm

Jim do you think its a repotting issue?

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Guest on Thu May 06, 2010 8:32 pm

I'm not sure its a deadwood problem either. I have two Ligustrum Vulgaris with happy looking roots but poor growth and dull leaves. There is also little deadwood on them. I wonder if there is a problem with the conducting system. Maybe its a fungus in the xylum or cambium?

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Ian Warhurst on Thu May 06, 2010 9:02 pm

Have you checked for vine weevil or red spider Jim the privets Will is talking about are pretty hardy although not indestructable. I have been working with privets for about 15 years now and find them quite tolerant. Even the deadwood on them, which will rot, doesn`t seem as delicate and quick rotting as yours.

Ian.

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  JimLewis on Fri May 07, 2010 12:46 pm

No bugs. Roots are fine. This has been happening over a few years now. I can only tie it into the deadwood, and that I may have carved too much. That branch that is looking poorly is on a rather isolated nub of "living" tree.

I have 7 or 8 more privet, and while this last winter was a tough one, they're all OK. I really like privet as bonsai. I've had this one since the late 90s. It was a 25-foot tree chopped down to 8-9 inches. The chop site never mended well, and the deadwood has grown from the original slanting cut to what you see now.

Since yesterday, I have about 10 vigorous root sprouts springing up around the edges of the base. I keep cutting them off at their bases, but more keep coming, and those that sprouted higher on the trunk that I've left alone are very healthy. So there's not much wrong with the vigor of the roots.


Last edited by JimLewis on Fri May 07, 2010 2:44 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : Got interrupted (which is very normal).)

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Paul B (Scotland) on Sat May 08, 2010 12:48 am

Hi Jim,

I too have a couple of Privet with deadwood, but have no problem with it. the deadwood on each tree has never been treated with anything and it still remains hard as nails. There's been no noticable decay on any of it for the past three years. Could it be anything to do with your climate?

How about letting your tree grow unrestrained in all areas for at least all of this season to see if that improves the vigour / strength of the tree. If this improves things, you could prune away all unwanted growth at a later stage.

Hope you manage to sort things out. It's a nice tree.

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  JimLewis on Sat May 08, 2010 1:19 am

Could it be anything to do with your climate?

Could well be, along with the move from sea-level North Florida to Western North Carolina's mountain foothills.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  gman on Sat May 08, 2010 4:38 am

How about the back being the new front?

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Smithy on Sat May 08, 2010 6:54 am

will baddeley wrote:I'm not sure its a deadwood problem either. I have two Ligustrum Vulgaris with happy looking roots but poor growth and dull leaves. There is also little deadwood on them. I wonder if there is a problem with the conducting system. Maybe its a fungus in the xylum or cambium?

My two privets have been the same as this. The one put out all those mushrooms last year.I repotted the one this year and there was a good root system. i think you are stop on there Will.

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Guest on Sat May 08, 2010 7:39 am

Hello Smithy. I am treating my two at present. If it works and the health improves, I'll post the results.

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Smithy on Sat May 08, 2010 8:12 am

what are you treating them with?

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Harleyrider on Thu May 13, 2010 8:58 pm

I've got several ligustrum with either large chops or carving on them. I've only noticed softening on the single variegated specimen I have. The tree is in rude health though.

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Smithy on Fri May 14, 2010 7:25 am

Hello stranger,
I'm sure mine were riddled with fungus when i dug them up . They had loads of rot in. I can see where i have made a big chop there is white in the middle which means the fungus is running right through , which was a good sign when i used to innoculate logs to grow mushrooms. This meant it was well and truly in there.

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Harleyrider on Fri May 14, 2010 8:58 pm

I've ventured outside today to have a look at the forest of Privet material near my house. Loads of them have got split or damaged trunks with lots of heartwood exposed, but not one of them show any signs of softening.
It makes me wonder whether they have some kind of defence against rotting which is negated by root pruning?

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  JimLewis on Fri May 14, 2010 11:41 pm

I suspect we need to define what privet we each are talking about. Mine is Ligustrum sinensis.

There is a very wide variety of privets growing in this world.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Smithy on Sat May 15, 2010 8:39 am

I think you are right JIm as mine are riddled with fungus but the dead wood hasn't really changed in 4 yrs.

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Jerry Meislik on Sat May 15, 2010 1:27 pm

JIm,
I would pot the tree up into a larger container or maybe a ground bed for a year or two. Keep taking away the root suckers as you have been.
Keep your fingers crossed.
Jerry

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  JimLewis on Sat May 15, 2010 7:49 pm

Thanks, Jerry. I'd about thought that would have to be my next step.

It does go against the grain to put this HIGHLY invasive species back into the ground, though.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Jerry Meislik on Sat May 15, 2010 8:35 pm

Jim,
Should it flower remove the flowers and it should be pretty non-invasive. I don't think the spread from roots/suckers is too hard to control.
Good luck.
Jerry

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  JimLewis on Sat Jul 17, 2010 5:40 pm

An update.


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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Jerry Meislik on Sat Jul 17, 2010 5:57 pm

Jim,
It is looking much stronger!
Jerry Bonsaihunk

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Another Update - or "Downdate"

Post  JimLewis on Sun Aug 14, 2011 2:54 pm

Alas . . . the "tree" today. The branch in the back on he last picture (above) is the only one that lived.

I'm probably going to ditch this one unless I see some kind of a "clumpish style" light this winter.



It was a nice run while it lasted.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Jerry Meislik on Sun Aug 14, 2011 2:59 pm

Jim,
sorry about the branch loss. They don't all work out and I have a few that show the same result.
Jerry

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  Ryan on Sun Aug 14, 2011 3:18 pm

JimLewis wrote:
I'm probably going to ditch this one unless I see some kind of a "clumpish style" light this winter.

Hey I'll take it Jim Razz

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

Post  JimLewis on Sun Aug 14, 2011 3:33 pm

You wouldn't want it. Like the Wicked Witch of the West it gets smaller every year: "I'm melting! I'm melting!"

Eventually there will be a pithy puddle in the middle there.

I'll just keep the pictures of it in its "heyday." I'm not about to dig another big root like this one at this stage of my life.

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Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

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Re: The DE-construction of a privet

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