itoigawa cuttings

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itoigawa cuttings

Post  kingbean on Mon Apr 19, 2010 8:51 pm

Just prunned my juniper and thought i would give it a go and try to root the trimmed bits.
So i planted them in loam and sand mixed. waterd in well.
I have dipped them in rooting hormone and sprayed them with fungicied 48 hours later plus misting them everyday.
does anyone know when i might find some roots on the?

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Re: itoigawa cuttings

Post  Fuzzy on Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:31 pm

I think I read it somewhere that cuttings can take up to two years to root. Shocked Smile

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Re: itoigawa cuttings

Post  Guest on Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:44 pm

Juniper cuttings can take up to two years to root but you can speed this up a bit. By taking the hardwood heel cuttings from rapid extention growth areas and keep them in a propagator.

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Re: itoigawa cuttings

Post  fiona on Mon Apr 19, 2010 10:03 pm

I just did this with some Blaauws prunings that my friend Peter was throwing on to the floor like they were going out of fashion last Wednesday. It's a bit of an experiment and I'm not hoping for immediate bonsai, but ya never know. I've got them in a propagator but suspect the best thing to do now is just walk away and ignore them and see what happens in a few months time.

I'm more interested in how long it takes my airlayer from an Itoigawa to set roots - the layer was done a week past Sunday. Anyone any experience of this?

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Re: itoigawa cuttings

Post  Guest on Mon Apr 19, 2010 10:13 pm

Hello Fiona. Yet again it depends what stage the foliage is at, above the airlayer. If it is pushing out the rapid extention growth, you might be able to remove the airlayers in a couple of months. Rotate the tree regularly for an even root. Junipers are as easy as Elms and Elms are quick.

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Re: itoigawa cuttings

Post  Joe Hatfield on Mon Apr 19, 2010 10:26 pm

I just mentioned in another post that Junipers (juniperus procumbens 'greenmound') were rooting easy for me.

I used what I guess is a mix of heel cutting and something else. I make a ''T'' from long new growth making sure to cut the bottom the this "T" to expose the vascular cambium , dip them in powered root hormone and place them in a bed of 100% organic potting soil. They are left under a bench receiving bits of sun. I keep them moderately wet most of the time.

Maybe it was just good luck. Maybe I just jinxed myself.

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Re: itoigawa cuttings

Post  Guest on Mon Apr 19, 2010 11:35 pm

There is a way of raising multiple, large cuttings of Juniper. There are plenty of cheap shrubby Junipers in garden centres, that will make mediocre bonsai. Knock the plant from its pot, drop it in a much larger pot and fill with soil, high up into the crown. The branches root very quickly and the cuttings grow rapidly.

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Re: itoigawa cuttings

Post  Smithy on Tue Apr 20, 2010 6:52 am

I put some cuttings in a pot with cat litter last year and just left them outside and they have taken.

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Re: itoigawa cuttings

Post  Klaudia & Martin on Tue Apr 20, 2010 8:28 pm

I still haven't tried juniperus but here they say that a "tearing off" works far better than a cut.

Best regards
Martin


Last edited by Klaudia & Martin on Tue Apr 20, 2010 8:29 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : writing mistake)

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Re: itoigawa cuttings

Post  Guest on Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:02 pm

Yes Martin, tearing off is the best option. Otherwise known as heel cuttings, vigorous side shoots are pulled down the trunk, tearing them off. The torn end of the cutting is then cleaned up with a sharp knife. I think the junction or heel has the hormones that produce roots.

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Re: itoigawa cuttings

Post  RKatzin on Tue Apr 20, 2010 10:50 pm

will baddeley wrote:There is a way of raising multiple, large cuttings of Juniper. There are plenty of cheap shrubby Junipers in garden centres, that will make mediocre bonsai. Knock the plant from its pot, drop it in a much larger pot and fill with soil, high up into the crown. Th
e branches root very quickly and the cuttings grow rapidly.
Thank you Will, I'm indebted. I've had exactly what you're talking about for about six months, a shrubby Green mound, one of those visions that came and went. I must have seen something there, but now it escapes me. I'd considered rafting, but it's a real awkward jumble of branches. This would turn it into a multitude of new pieces to set out in a grove or be trained for a piece like Cees put together. It's just been sitting there and I keep looking at and asking it, "What are you, why are you here in my garden"? A brisk wind toppled it over last night and it lay in the rain all night. When I found it this morning all soaked and bedraggled looking, matted hair and snifflely nose, poor little orphan tree. I picked it up and as I shook the rain out of it and set it back on the shelf I said to it, "Something will come up, you're a beautiful tree and it's not your fault". Thanks again for the suggestion Will, it's so simple I'm surprized I didn't think of it, I'm usually pretty good with simple things. Laughing

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Shimpaku Cuttings

Post  tompavlick on Sat May 29, 2010 3:11 am

I have been taking shimpaku cuttings for 35 years. In Eastern Pennsylvania, the best time for hardwood cuttings is late May to early June, green wood cuttings (new shoots) in late August to September. I use a mixture of 1/3 Hadite or Schultz Aquatic Soil, which is kiln fired Fuller's Earth and 2/3 Miracle Grow potting soil in flats or shallow pots. The cuttings are 1/8 to 1/4 inch in diameter cut on a 45 degree angle and 3-6 inches in length. I cut off the foliage near the base, leaving 1'16-1/8" green stumps. This helps to keep the cuttings from heaving out of the planting mix during the winter. Stick the cuttings in sugar water for 1 hour, then dip the cuttings in rooting hormone, shove them in the planting mix about 1 to 1 1/2 inches apartand keep in shade until they strike roots. I water the cuttings two or three times a day, once in the morning, again at 4-5 P.M. and during the summer at 10 P.M. Cuttings will form a callous over the cut by early to mid spring of the following year and can be transplanted into small 4" plastic pots either in September or left to winter over until the following spring. About 80% to 90% of the cuttings will take root. Check the cuttings in early spring to make sure they haven't been forced out of the mixture by winter freezing of the soil (heaving). Good luck.

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Re: itoigawa cuttings

Post  littleart-fx on Mon May 31, 2010 2:34 pm

hi! all!

I always put juniper cuttings in the ground, with a sharp knife i cut them pointy
Put them through a lubricant powder for cuttings (universal)
They grow on anything!,......yes yes yes!
Best results stamped moss with little harsh sand.
as far 1cm across speaking.

have some pretty nice results,....mame, speaking!

grtz m

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Re: itoigawa cuttings

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