Spring time

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Spring time

Post  chansen on Wed Mar 24, 2010 12:34 am

Both of the stones represent spring to me. Here in Utah, spring consists of snow one day, and temperatures in the 60s the next. I woke up to snow this morning, but it was all melted by 2pm. The first stone represents the mountain I see from my backyard, covered in a light spring snow.





To me, the second stone is a hill side starting to bloom. Although we don't usually get this in the spring time here in Utah, I lived in Virginia not too long ago and I loved the cherries, dogwoods, and redbuds in the spring.





I love the reawakening that goes on this time of year. Anyone else have spring season stones they can share?

Happy Spring!

Christian

chansen
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Re: Spring time

Post  Jeremy on Wed Mar 24, 2010 11:26 am

Hi,
I love the reawakening that goes on this time of year. Anyone else have spring season stones they can share?
Happy Spring!

Two stones I'd like to share. Both spring picture stones.
A chinese stone.


A welsh stone with the chinese stone.

Jeremy
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Re: Spring time

Post  Chris Cochrane on Wed Mar 24, 2010 5:15 pm

Hi Christian... Your post re' David Brunner's Ono no Komachi stone has had me reeling... and writing. You cannot know how much it meant as the stone presentation had already caught my imagination, though it was a bit awry for a public exhibition. I need to return to it but am still reflecting on journeys, liminal space, embodied virtue & humility. Sometimes the controversial is necessary to draw emotion & deeper expression. The Joy of Bonsai (in Bath, UK, this past weekend) with its "Innovations" exhibits (see IBC thread) worked similarly to draw new expression not unlike intimate alcove display does in Japan.

You once again catch imagination by expressing two seasons in March-- journeying in Utah-inspired & Virginia-inspired mindscape where the atmosphere differs. Each landscape stone inspires filling the void but with allusions differing even with the time of day. There is a nice tea ceremony website that I might recommend visting to reap feeling for seasons-- check-out monthly (in this case February & March) seasonal articles on the "News & Events" menu. On the "Articles" menu, check-out "Focus on the Journey" where the fabled management consultant Tom Peters notes:
... we should make everyday for everyone a pursuit of improvement.
That statement is so Confucian and so Christian Hansen. Cultivating your efforts which reflect on your society & in your individual relationships.

IBC suiseki friend Luciana Queirolo wrote me recently. She published an article dedicated to Lynn Boyd in the online Italian Bonsai & Suiseki magazine (Fb. edition, pp. 46-49). I cannot figure how to move the text into automated translator, but I warmly appreciate Luciana's thoughtfulness towards Lynn. Through an Italian friend's illustration, I can visit Lynn's studio as I've never seen it, see stones & paintings shared by people I deeply admire and even see natural remote places that Lynn & Luciana have shared by photograph. The internet is amazing. A natural but uncommonly apt stone takes us on such journeys with surprising simplicity-- especially when thoughtfully displayed.

_________________
... visit the U.S. National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, Washington DC USA-- http://www.bonsai-nbf.com

Chris Cochrane
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Re: Spring time

Post  chansen on Fri Mar 26, 2010 5:30 pm

Chris and Jeremy -

Thank you both for your replies. Sorry for not responding sooner. I'm a graduate student at the moment, and this week has been my spring break. I've taken advantage of the time to do spring work on my trees. I once again woke to snow this morning that is currently in the process of melting off, so I have some tree free time until tomorrow. I also have to get ready for a corporate finance exam I have coming up on Monday... it never stops coming Smile.

Jeremy -

I have seen your Welsh stone here a few times, and I like it more each time I see it. I'm reminded of a snow covered cliff face. Very familiar image for me. The Chinese stone reminds me of the cherry blossom festival in Washington DC. Also a very nice spring image, and one that brings back good memories for me. Here's a picture I took at the festival last spring while walking around the Jefferson Memorial in Washington DC.



Chris -

Thank you for your kind words. My thoughts and feelings can only come from the same place as everyone else... personal life experiences. I find that may forms of art can take a person through thoughtful introspection. My only hope is that the objects remain as reminders of experiences, hopes, and dreams instead of becoming the focal point of adulation. The things I choose to surround myself with serve as reminders to be out and doing. No sense is sitting on my backside when I can be out working on something. For example, really nice mountain stones remind me of my brother (he loves hiking high mountain peaks, I usually start feeling it at about 10,000 ft.), they remind me of the beauty of the earth on which I live, and they prod me to go explore. All good things to me. Two of them remind me to act (call my brother, and take my family for a hike). We all draw from our experiences, and we use those experiences to frame the way in which we see the world around us. Hopefully we all see some of the same, and all work toward the good.

Best regards,

Christian

chansen
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Re: Spring time

Post  David Brunner on Sun Mar 28, 2010 3:15 am

Christian –

Thank you for sharing your “spring stones.” I have only one that I think will qualify for your category of "spring stones" and sadly today I do not have a photo as I am away from home attending to business. The one I have in mind is a flattish gray stone with depressed ribbons of white, that when I look upon I see the failing snow fields of the High Sierra in summer. Perhaps not spring, but “springish” at least as these melting snow fields provide life-giving water to the myriad fields and populace below.

Thank you again for the reminder of spring east of the 100th meridian. I lived for a decade or so close to the Ozarks, I will always remember with great fondness the last few weeks of April when the redbuds (Cercis canadensis) and dogwoods (Cornus capitata) were in flower. In that ecosystem, each is an understory shrub, and their blooms shine out together through the tracery of still naked oak or hickory branches as candles of the oncoming summer warmth. Though I have been in California for a long while, spring in the Ozarks is still dear to me. Thank you for bringing that back with your stone!

David B.

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Re: Spring time

Post  Chris Cochrane on Sun Mar 28, 2010 10:49 am

Thanks Christian, Jeremy & David. It is an honor to listen & savor your thoughts & thoughtfulness.

Redbud & dogwood understory trees are common in natural woodlands, here. Regrettably, the reality can be overlooked. Brains acquire some funny screening. Recalling a first fitting for eyeglasses &, much later, for hearing aids, reality was painfully colorful & deafening, but the intensity fades within days. So much fades into background when minds are not attentive. Leave a memorable scene and it holds vibrance after absence; additionally, the memory is arguably always with you.

Though he is seldom a raging optimist, Morikami writes (paraphrased?) in Norwegian Wood about saving letters...
Burn them & what stays in your heart will stay,
keep them & what vanishes will perish.

_________________
... visit the U.S. National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, Washington DC USA-- http://www.bonsai-nbf.com

Chris Cochrane
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Re: Spring time

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