Cape Honeysuckle

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Cape Honeysuckle

Post  Joe Hatfield on Fri Feb 27, 2009 5:08 am

This is what I believe to be a Cape Honeysuckle. I'm looking for some general advice with this one, as it is my first attempt with a honeysuckle. This was picked out by my lovely wife to be. So.... I think that I better get it right or I'm going to be in some sort of trouble. OR EVEN WORSE!! Sleeping on one of your couches. Picking a front is my first real objective. Thanks






Another side. I like this one.







More pics available HERE

Joe Hatfield
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Cape Honeysuckle

Post  JimLewis on Fri Feb 27, 2009 1:07 pm

I think you have two trees there. You my have to split the roots, but there actually may be two plants in the pot. At any rate, I don't think the right and left sides go too well together as a bonsai.

You are aware that the Cape Honeysuckle is NOT a honeysuckle?? It is a Begonia.

_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

JimLewis
Member


Back to top Go down

A BEGONIA!

Post  Joe Hatfield on Fri Feb 27, 2009 2:56 pm

Jim, I didn't know it was a begonia.!!

I was thinking the same thing about possibly having 2 trees here. I wont truly know until it gets a little warmer and I'm able to mess around a bit. Thanks for your time and efforts Jim.

ANYONE ELSE??

Joe Hatfield
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Cape Honeysuckle

Post  David Brunner on Fri Feb 27, 2009 4:13 pm

Hi Joe - Jim is almost right, your plant is Tecoma capensis in the Bignoniaceae, the same family with our native Catalpa and Trumpet vine. It is not however a Begonia, but like most Begonias it is tender to hard frost so be certain to protect it in winter. They love heat and will reward you in summer with bunches of bright orange trumpet-shaped flowers.

I've grown many of these when I lived in the desert southwest, (they will not thrive in San Francisco's cool summers where I live now) but I usually treated them as flowering shrubs rather than bonsai, since they are prone to long rangy growth and only flower on new growth.

I hope this is helpful,
David Brunner

David Brunner
Member


Back to top Go down

Cape Honeysuckle

Post  bonsaisr on Fri Feb 27, 2009 4:20 pm

Sorry to intrude. This is a test.
Iris

bonsaisr
Member


Back to top Go down

david

Post  Joe Hatfield on Sat Feb 28, 2009 1:12 am

Yes this identification seems to fit much better. It is very helpful. It is currently living out the rest of the cold season in doors. -- Thanks David!

I've inspected the tree a little further. I do not think I will be able to get a second tree out of this without some severe separation in the root ball or to a shared tap root. I might want to look at creating a "clump" like style or some sort of "group" for this. I will not be doing any changed until the temperature is warmer. Prior to my ownership it was in a regulated green house with 80% humidity ( it seemed) and temperature in the 80's. So I'm a little nervous doing anything drastic at this time.


Anyone wanna attempt a photoshop?? Smile


-Joe

Joe Hatfield
Member


Back to top Go down

Bignonia or syn Doxantha

Post  jamesransom on Sat Feb 28, 2009 4:25 pm

Yes it is a Bignonia or cross vine syn Doxantha if it is B.radicans it would also be known as Campsis radicans or B.Jasminoides it is Known as Pandorea jasminoides. It will grow like mad if happy and the flowers may be big but wouls be fun to have a go.

James

jamesransom
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Cape Honeysuckle

Post  JimLewis on Sat Feb 28, 2009 11:10 pm

Joe Hatfield wrote:
I've inspected the tree a little further. I do not think I will be able to get a second tree out of this without some severe separation in the root ball or to a shared tap root.
-Joe

I'd wait to do anything until mid to late spring, but you will have to cut the taproot off anyway. I'd bet that if you sawed the tree at the red line, you would find that there would be quite a clump of fine roots under the left-hand section -- which looks to me like it may have the most bonsai potential of the two halves, though both will be fine. I don't like the right side and left side leaning away from each other if left together.


_________________
Jim Lewis - lewisjk@windstream.net - Western NC - People, when Columbus discovered this country, it was plumb full of nuts and berries. And I'm right here to tell you the berries are just about all gone. Uncle Dave Macon, old-time country musician

JimLewis
Member


Back to top Go down

jim

Post  Joe Hatfield on Mon Mar 02, 2009 8:45 pm

Thanks for the advice. It's always very valuable.

Joe Hatfield
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: Cape Honeysuckle

Post  Sponsored content Today at 1:14 am


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum