yamadori hornbeam 2010

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: yamadori hornbeam 2010

Post  bottasegreta on Wed Feb 04, 2015 10:01 pm

Hi, I have sort of a novice question, and I don't want you to take it the wrong way, but I'm curious why you haven't taken more drastic measures to deal with the odd root on the right (tree's left)? The base is just about as perfect and as you could hope for, save for that one root. I'm really impressed by the way you carved it, its very very elegant, but why not simply bury that root under the soil, or even better, layer the tree just above where you carved? You clearly have plenty of horticultural skill. As it is now, it's an amazing progression and I have nothing to compare to it personally, but to my eye the tree looks unstable, and like its falling over, and the root just draws my eye away from an image that is otherwise very sublime. If the tree was tilted to its left and that root buried or layered it seems like it would appear much more stable and your eye would still be drawn to that very powerful base, but would then travel up the tree rather than being drawn away by that very conspicuous root. Just thought I'd ask. Thanks, and again, it's pretty awesome what you've done with it.

bottasegreta
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: yamadori hornbeam 2010

Post  Sorcertree on Thu Feb 05, 2015 11:22 am

beer city snake wrote:
Maros Belan wrote:

i really dig this picture...

the way the snow lays upon the branches is gorgeous and the super shallow depth of field is very nice allowing the foreground snow to stand out from the background snow...

oh yeah... the tree is great too !

The lines of the underlying tile really compliment it too. Wonderful tree!

Sorce

Sorcertree
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: yamadori hornbeam 2010

Post  Maros Belan on Fri Feb 06, 2015 1:54 pm


Yes, that's what I mistook soil for.

I've used zeoliths as a nutrient absorbent in saltwater aquaria with a German company called korallen zucht, it is pretty expensive for a 1L bag of rocks!  Apparently there are different kinds.  Nonetheless, very interesting, thanks again for sharing.  Your hornbeam has a bright future.

Evan, Thanks for your comments. Regarding zeolit, most probably what you used in your aquarium is very similar product (or same) as my potting medium. I know it is pretty expensive in Germany and in small packaging it special shops it must be bonanza. But I buy it from producer directly and it is dirt cheap compared to any other available alternative. And works fantastically.

Hi, I have sort of a novice question, and I don't want you to take it the wrong way, but I'm curious why you haven't taken more drastic measures to deal with the odd root on the right (tree's left)? The base is just about as perfect and as you could hope for, save for that one root. I'm really impressed by the way you carved it, its very very elegant, but why not simply bury that root under the soil, or even better, layer the tree just above where you carved? You clearly have plenty of horticultural skill. As it is now, it's an amazing progression and I have nothing to compare to it personally, but to my eye the tree looks unstable, and like its falling over, and the root just draws my eye away from an image that is otherwise very sublime. If the tree was tilted to its left and that root buried or layered it seems like it would appear much more stable and your eye would still be drawn to that very powerful base, but would then travel up the tree rather than being drawn away by that very conspicuous root. Just thought I'd ask. Thanks, and again, it's pretty awesome what you've done with it.

bottasegreta, your questions is absolutely OK. Regarding current position of the tree, it is result of last repotting when I realized that either I will remove too much roots in one go, or one of main roots stay above ground. I went for second option, maybe temporarily or it will stay like it is forever. I will see. I was afraid to carve it too much since it could kill whole root and than create unnecessary dead wood on the trunk afterwards. But if you think about it a bit, maybe if the root is buried tree will look too tidy. So exposed root can create some emotions, hm? Question is if there could be natural forces which could transform real tree this way? I think, I can imagine real tree growing on spot where soil suddenly moves. On the edge of the hill or something like this, and after heavy rain there soil slides a bit. One root is exposed, whole tree is leaning from its original axis. Later, end of the exposed root dies and crates hollow, where family of foxes lives. Tree adapts to new conditions and grows for another 200 years. Could it be like this, or no?  Very Happy

The lines of the underlying tile really compliment it too. Wonderful tree!
Sorce

Thanks for your compliments Sorce. Very Happy

I am happy that someone else is using pure zeolit too with good results Smile Do you use 1-2mm on small plants by chance or only the 4-8mm?

Thanks Thomas for your comments. Regarding fraction of zeolit, I use two - 2.5-5mm and 4-8 mm. I use smaller one for really small trees, in small pots. Bigger one for all others. I use even bigger fraction in really big pots into drainage layer on the bottom of the pot. Actually I never used 1-2mm fraction you mention. In my opinion it is too small, not draining enough, easily clogging by organic fertilisers I use, possibly keeping too much water in spring and autumn. In my opinion there is no reason from horticultural point of view to use such small fraction. My be for really small trees, but it is not my field, my smallest tree must be over 30cm. Very Happy[/quote]

Maros Belan
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: yamadori hornbeam 2010

Post  manumidam on Sat Feb 07, 2015 3:11 pm

congratulations this is a stuning hornbeam.
for me the planting angle is spot on and i wouldn't considere changing it.
however the bulk on the root is distracting and could be refined a bit, which is something you seem to considere doing if i'm not mistaken.
what about the position of the tree in the pot? i mean: the tree's movement is clearly toward the left, do you plan to move the tree toward the right side of the pot?

regards.
emmanuel.

manumidam
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: yamadori hornbeam 2010

Post  Maros Belan on Mon Feb 09, 2015 7:50 pm

manumidam wrote:congratulations this is a stuning hornbeam.
for me the planting angle is spot on and i wouldn't considere changing it.
however the bulk on the root is distracting and could be refined a bit, which is something you seem to considere doing if i'm not mistaken.
what about the position of the tree in the pot? i mean: the tree's movement is clearly toward the left, do you plan to move the tree toward the right side of the pot?

regards.
emmanuel.

Thanks for comment Emmanuel. Tree was repotted from original plastic bowl, where it was sitting from its collection. Plastic pots are cheap, and are OK, but they tend to bend when moved around the garden and there is risk of damaging roots. So I would say when I did repotting, main reason was lets say horticultural, and not primarily aesthetic. Frankly speaking I forced the tree into pot as was possible, tried not to remove too much roots, and you can see the outcome. You can see discussion about root, and as you mentioned position towards left is not ideal also, as you said. I hope I will manage to fix those position issues during next reppoting.

Maros Belan
Member


Back to top Go down

Re: yamadori hornbeam 2010

Post  Sponsored content Today at 6:13 pm


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum