A stone i found near were i live

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A stone i found near were i live

Post  jamesransom on Thu Feb 26, 2009 9:45 pm

Would like to hear what fellow people think of the stone i found near me. I have shown all angles of the stone to give you a better idea. I am planning to remake a new base for for it but its a rainy day job.

Front
[img][/img][img]
Top
[/img]
Back
[img][/img]
Uncut Base
[img][/img]

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Re: A stone i found near were i live

Post  Yvoune on Thu Feb 26, 2009 9:49 pm

The second view is the most appealing to me, wow Shocked

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A stone i found near where i live

Post  Guest on Thu Feb 26, 2009 10:27 pm

This is a GREAT stone.
Could you please tell us its size?

Peter

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The size of the stone.

Post  jamesransom on Thu Feb 26, 2009 10:36 pm

Hi Peter and all interested, the stone is about 35-40cm long about 10cm wide and 7cm at the tallest part. I am not sure of the type of rock but the lines are not quartz more like lime stone? I know my plants but not my stone Smile

James

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Re: A stone i found near were i live

Post  Chris Cochrane on Fri Feb 27, 2009 12:44 am

Hi James... This looks similar to limestone found in Virginia (USA) mountain rivers-- Edinburg limestone (in our case). If like ours, its moist black surface tends to move toward dry & grey in sheen/color if exposed to weather. As collected in a river where the surface is repeatedly worn, it is often moist & black with the possible exception of unexposed surfaces. Often, all is moist & black after collection except for inclusions of calcite which are usually clean white, dirty white, shades of rust/orange or a combination.

Edinburg limestone is highly susceptible to etching by even mild acid. Only one state away (Maryland), a Potomac Viewing Stone Group friend collects and dips limestone in strong Muriatic acid to achieve a uniform jet-black & moist surface which leaves calcite deposits bright white. Yours could be comparable-- his collected stones have mottled surfaces before acid bathing. He has practiced with enough stones & acid strengths to somewhat control the sheen which can be distractingly glossy.

This stone would be fine for suiseki if the stone could maintain/increase its luster & depth of color by dry dusting/polishing. I've had a similar stone polish to a higher black sheen when lifted repeatedly in fitting a stand (but only where the fitting occurred). Mechanical buffing doesn't help-- at least, I couldn't achieve the polish which occurred in fitting though I repeatedly tried.

Oiling looks good temporarily but ultimately stains the stone. Repeated hand polishing is very light oiling. Adding wet detergent or liquid soap to the dry stone temporarily adds sheen but ages it similar to advanced weathering. Black polish (shoe wax) will return a light grey, dry limestone to moist & black, but you can't use black polish & retain beautifully contrasting calcite inclusions.

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... visit the U.S. National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, Washington DC USA-- http://www.bonsai-nbf.com

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cool rock

Post  Joe Hatfield on Fri Feb 27, 2009 1:09 am

Cool rock you got there. How much work have you put into this?

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Re: A stone i found near were i live

Post  guy ward on Fri Feb 27, 2009 10:03 am

nice stone-- perhaps a lighter sandy coloured base when redone-

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The stone and work done...

Post  jamesransom on Fri Feb 27, 2009 1:52 pm

Hi All
This is a real funny one, I live in Jersey Channel islands uk and found the stone just off the coast line near my boat. Jersey sits mainly on granite or lava rock. The stone is very hard with some chalky markings as you see, to find more of the stone is few and far between. Maybe it was imported 100 years or so ago from france as (we are only 12 miles away) but not sure.
The work i had done on the stone is just a clean to remove the grime then i gently heated the stone and rubbed it with a block of bees wax. I wiped off the excess wax and made a dai for it all this was done about 4 yrs ago. since then i dust it and dream its an unknown island ..............full of lovely women Laughing ..........just kidding bonsai would be better they dont talk back pirat

James

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Re: A stone i found near were i live

Post  Norma on Fri Feb 27, 2009 3:39 pm

Hi James,

It's always fun to see stones collected in local areas......I agree with Chris about your stone appearing to be limestone. It's a beauty Very Happy

It really reminds me of lingbi from China ; even the cut bottom shows an appearance that is similar to my lingbi. I think the base is fine but the stone seems to have broken in spots? When you carve a new daiza keep the color dark so as not to distract from the stone.

Great start with stone collecting, James.....hope you find more!!

Norma

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The stone, i had another look.

Post  jamesransom on Fri Feb 27, 2009 3:48 pm

Thanks all
I had another look to me it looks like slate but you may know better and could be sandstone.

Hi Norma, The stone is how i found it and have not cut the base and is still intact or as i found it. I felt i was lucky and a bit like a spoilt child getting all you can ask for at christmas. It tends to make other finds more difficult for some reason.

Thanks James

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Re: A stone i found near were i live

Post  Chris Cochrane on Fri Feb 27, 2009 4:46 pm

Hi James... The beeswax treatment might not be so funny. Consider that beeswax is impervious to water, lightly-tinted and used by bees as a glue to hold hive structures together. It is not so different from other waxes and oils (including petroleum products, plant/animal extracts & oil from your skin) except that it is more sticky. Often beeswax products are mixed with other oils acting as wetting agents for spreading & absorbing it.

Fine wood furniture receives a hard finish (lacquer et al.) on top of which beeswax is applied so that dirty beeswax can occasionally be removed for reapplication of a fresh, clean coat.

The intent of wet or dry aging suiseki is to create a permanent skin which holds moisture close to the stone's surface. Beeswax repels water-- collecting debris in a water repelling seal instead of in a water retentive skin. Re-oiling or waxing a stone temporarily adds sheen or gloss, but the treatment(s) eventually dries, discolors & is near impossible to remove. Natural translucence of the stone suffers over time. Color changes, too.

Beeswax is far from a panacea to display the natural surface of a stone. For the present, this stone looks fine... and, perhaps, that is okay. I'd collect and pay attention to similar stones (though noting this one as rare on Jersey Island) where you can view and possibly experiment with their aging over time. The truest lessons will come from your experience.

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... visit the U.S. National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, Washington DC USA-- http://www.bonsai-nbf.com

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Re: A stone i found near were i live

Post  Milan Kulhavy on Fri Feb 27, 2009 7:44 pm

The stone is very nice (keiryu-seki) but to use oil or wax is not suitable for real suiseki.Good surface is achieved only yoseki process.

Have a nice day.

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will keep the wax for the wifes legs!

Post  jamesransom on Fri Feb 27, 2009 9:16 pm

Thanks Chris
Yes i understand about that i did use a pure wax block and a small amount but enough. The normal color of the stone is the base color and without the flash on it looks more that color but will avoid wax in the future.

James

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Re: A stone i found near were i live

Post  furuya on Sat Feb 28, 2009 6:04 pm

Hi James,

Your stone is a nice limestone, but not from French coasts, I have gone in vacation during more than 10 years
in Normandie(Granville) and I visited many times your nice island, I know French coasts and have many friends from there.
So I think you must search around the place where you found this one, maybe you can find others.

Like Chris told you, don't use oil for stones, it is better to rub it with a cotton cloth. Don't use neither muriatic acid because
this kind of stones have much calcite, which will be damaged by acid and you will risk to have two or more pieces : calcite with acid
will transform in CAOH and give many bubbles, if you don't have experiences with muriatic acid, you will lost your stone.

The color of your stone is enough dark, you must only give it a bit more patina, only that.
If you can give us another picture clearer, we will be very happy.
Thanks for sharing with us,

marco

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Re: A stone i found near were i live

Post  Chris Cochrane on Sat Feb 28, 2009 7:20 pm

Hi James... Thanks for taking my post in the spirit intended. Returning contributors to threads are very gracious, here. The forum has been & continues to be open to a wide variety of stone enthusiasm.

You & I consider the effects of practice while still doing the best we can to display our stones. Beeswax might be the very best option for this stone's appreciation-- it looks good, now, with no signs of staining or deterioration after two years. I’m sure you are anticipating the future as well as the present. Some stones will not improve by yoseki practice.

My black Edinburg limestone specimens fail from dry-aging (clean dry-cloth dusting/polishing) & wet-aging (gentle watering & weather exposure), so I experiment. IBC member “Furuya” (Marco Favero) once sat beside me as the president of Nippon Suiseki Association characterized one of my treasured Edinburg limestone a “pickle stone” at a symposium in 2002. He was humorously referring to a stone better-used to hold down the lid of a pickle jar than appreciated as suiseki, I think. Perhaps, Matsuura-san also thought it looked like a pickle.... :-)

Your stone displays a wonderful landscape-view form, James. It is not a pickle stone.

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